Drucquer & Sons, Loch Ness, April 8th Release Date

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craig61a

Lifer
Apr 29, 2017
4,354
32,936
Minnesota USA
I like crumble cakes, as well as plugs. I am not sure I like the hockey puck plugs like Salty Dog and Condor as much. But, I guess this is why they make a variety of products.
What I like about the crumble cakes is that I can just break them up with my fingers without having to get out a knife and deal with all of that wasted time slicing and prepping. I know some guys like to fiddle around like that, but smoking is what I do all day long, so I don't get into all of that ritual lighting of candles, incantations, and prepping the beast for sacrifice and such.
 

clynch

Starting to Get Obsessed
Feb 3, 2013
262
611
Pensacola Florida
I realize that much. But as I understand it, Pease recreated the blends after the shop ceased operations, and has now created at least two new blends (First Amendment and now Loch Ness). How did he decide to release these under Drucquer instead of GLP? That’s basically what I’m wondering.
I hit the link and read about all the various blends. I am truly captivated. I want to try every one. Thanks for the post. Wish I could buy them all. Wife would kill me. I've been bad lately. Hey, if I end up in the dog house it might be a great place to enjoy my pipe in peace. I always smoke outside. I'd love to smoke indoors. Dog House sounds pretty inviting!
 

robbie

Lurker
Feb 1, 2022
40
105
Scottish Borders
sounds great looks like a regular run. I wonder why its sold as a scottish blend? I always assumed a Scottish was like English with some cavendish
 

SBC

Part of the Furniture Now
Oct 6, 2021
575
1,683
NE Wisconsin
sounds great looks like a regular run. I wonder why its sold as a scottish blend? I always assumed a Scottish was like English with some cavendish

Yeah same, I always thought of Scottish as English except with more cavendish than VA for a base.

But in the video above, Shane defined Scottish as an English with perique.

TBH I'm not sure how seriously I can take these geo-political / nation-state classifications until somebody lays out some meaningful history for me. E.g. if you can establish historically that some such kind of mixture was (a) dominant within, and (b) unique to, some nation-state, during some meaningful period of history, then great, that's a great classification.

So was perique added to latakia mixtures north of Hadrian's wall far more than it was south of Hadrian's wall?
If not, why are we manipulating nostalgia with fake-lore like "the Scottish blending tradition"?
 
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Singularis

Can't Leave
Sep 11, 2019
319
1,466
Wausau, Wis
And here I thought Scottish blends were less emphasis on the latakia, and more emphasis on burley and/or cavendish. In fact, the first blend that I encountered as "Scottish" was Mac Baren's Scottish Mixture, which not only has no latakia, but is a mild aromatic!

A different approach is to note that there are only 14 blends in production that are crumble cakes with latakia and perique, among which are Plum Pudding, Russ' Tastykake, and Bow-legged Bear.

 

SBC

Part of the Furniture Now
Oct 6, 2021
575
1,683
NE Wisconsin
And here I thought Scottish blends were less emphasis on the latakia, and more emphasis on burley and/or cavendish. In fact, the first blend that I encountered as "Scottish" was Mac Baren's Scottish Mixture, which not only has no latakia, but is a mild aromatic!

A different approach is to note that there are only 14 blends in production that are crumble cakes with latakia and perique, among which are Plum Pudding, Russ' Tastykake, and Bow-legged Bear.

Do you know I had the very same thought about Plum Pudding? It would be a "Scottish" by this definition.

Or to filter from a different direction, TR tells me that there are only 5 "Scottish" blends that are still in production that have at least 50 reviews.

3 of those 5 are produced by Rattray's (which has Scottish roots, but moved to Germany at some point), one is Orlik, and one is STG.

None of those 5 contain any perique.

The three Rattray Scottishes (the only ones we can take seriously, as having some Scottish roots) are latakia mixtures on black cavendish vs. VA bases.

So we seem to have been right about the cavendish definition.

The ONLY significant "Scottish" blend to contain perique is another Drucquer & Sons -- Blairgowrie.

So defining a Scottish mixture by perique seems to be unique to D&S, a brand with English, not Scottish, roots.

All the other significant Scottishes are from a brand with actual Scottish roots -- Rattray's -- and they define Scottish by cavendish, not perique.

I think that about settles it.
 
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Reactions: Singularis

Singularis

Can't Leave
Sep 11, 2019
319
1,466
Wausau, Wis
Yeah same, I always thought of Scottish as English except with more cavendish than VA for a base.

But in the video above, Shane defined Scottish as an English with perique.

TBH I'm not sure how seriously I can take these geo-political / nation-state classifications until somebody lays out some meaningful history for me. E.g. if you can establish historically that some such kind of mixture was (a) dominant within, and (b) unique to, some nation-state, during some meaningful period of history, then great, that's a great classification.

So was perique added to latakia mixtures north of Hadrian's wall far more than it was south of Hadrian's wall?
If not, why are we manipulating nostalgia with fake-lore like "the Scottish blending tradition"?
Going back to this point: there's lots of ink spilled under the bridge about what really makes English and Balkan two distinctive styles, including the fact that "English" was short for "English mixture" which may or may NOT have latakia in it. (Maybe Dunhill's many blends with latakia helped create that legend?)
 

fireground_piper

Part of the Furniture Now
Jan 30, 2020
871
3,101
New Jersey
Do you know I had the very same thought about Plum Pudding? It would be a "Scottish" by this definition.

Or to filter from a different direction, TR tells me that there are only 5 "Scottish" blends that are still in production that have at least 50 reviews.

3 of those 5 are produced by Rattray's (which has Scottish roots, but moved to Germany at some point), one is Orlik, and one is STG.

None of those 5 contain any perique.

The three Rattray Scottishes (the only ones we can take seriously, as having some Scottish roots) are latakia mixtures on black cavendish vs. VA bases.

So we seem to have been right about the cavendish definition.

The ONLY significant "Scottish" blend to contain perique is another Drucquer & Sons -- Blairgowrie.

So defining a Scottish mixture by perique seems to be unique to D&S, a brand with English, not Scottish, roots.

All the other significant Scottishes are from a brand with actual Scottish roots -- Rattray's -- and they define Scottish by cavendish, not perique.

I think that about settles it.
I don’t think the search is giving you good results. Robert McConnell has 3 Scottish labeled blends, two of them that contain perique (cake and flake). The third doesn’t have it listed, but has a note that mentions perique in the description. That’s just the first brand that comes to mind.