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Humblepipe

Lifer
Sep 13, 2019
1,874
6,876
Guerneville, CA
Gents, I have really enjoyed blending my own tobacco. I like my own blends better than anything commercially available. I have blended over a dozen of my own concoctions over the past 6 months. Admittedly, it is likely about the pride of ownership rather than excellence in blending. Still, I am having so much fun and am enjoying the fruits of my labor! For the most part I source my tobacco via P&Cs (bulk tobaccos). Is there another source I should consider?

Thanks in advance for any advice!
 

F4RM3R

Part of the Furniture Now
Nov 28, 2019
567
2,513
38
Canada
I only smoke my own blends. I buy from wholeleaftobacco and do alot of stoving(virginia and Kentucky) and pressing into cakes. I also like to case and top with bourbon, rum and tonka beans.

I also enjoy experimenting and am really refining my blends(an accurate scale is needed for consistent results). I've made many many blends and variations of blends. Have a few go tos, but it's nice to mix up something with exactly what you want, with the right strength. Very satisfying and lots of fun!
 

sumusfumus

Part of the Furniture Now
Jul 20, 2017
596
546
New York City
Gents, I have really enjoyed blending my own tobacco. I like my own blends better than anything commercially available. I have blended over a dozen of my own concoctions over the past 6 months. Admittedly, it is likely about the pride of ownership rather than excellence in blending. Still, I am having so much fun and am enjoying the fruits of my labor! For the most part I source my tobacco via P&Cs (bulk tobaccos). Is there another source I should consider?

Thanks in advance for any advice!
Nice to read that you have concocted some homemade mixtures that you enjoy smoking. Continued success!

I also do some of my own mixing. I usually start with a base-blend, mixed by a professional and then add some other tobaccos or other commercially available blends to the original base, just to tweak it into a new direction.

For example, I enjoy smoking Lane Ltd "HGL"....so I use this as my base and start adding other tobaccos to the "HGL". I also add some cigar-leaf to most of my experiments. The small addition of cigar-leaf can really add more flavor interest to most blends, without major alterations to the original's flavor profile. This is the process that I used to make my own mixture. The recipe is posted on this forum as: "Pleasant Moments".

Good luck. Post some of your recipes.
 

mso489

Lifer
Feb 21, 2013
41,210
60,530
I consider what I do mixing rather than blending proper, since I don't use oven, pressure, or aging, but I enjoy it and have had some of my best smokes from this. Unless you are quite experienced, you might get best results with two or three tobaccos, or jazzing a blend with a condiment. Proportion is a key; you can get several different "blends" out of two tobaccos mixed in different proportions. I think C&D makes some good blending tobaccos, such as their Turkish, cigar leaf, black Cavedish, and burleys of different kinds. You can sometimes rescue a blend that has lost its Latakia or just become routine by adding a pinch of this or that, or bigger portions. I think three tobaccos is a good beginner number. I mostly don't mix much, just a few pipe bowls in a pottery bowl, impromptu and not keeping any recipes. For me it's just fun, not a craft I'm learning, though I admire those who make more of a study of it. For starters, you can't go far wrong with equal parts of a Virginia and a burley, and a pinch of black Cavendish.
 
I really enjoy blending tobacco that I've grown as well. I am currently smoking more in rotation of what I have done myself. Sometimes, I wish that it was more legal to share them, because there's a joy or pride that comes from having someone compliment something that I've created from dirt and seed... an affirmation that I've made something good.

I've been thinking more about getting more variety of cigar leaf from one of the whole leaf places, so that I can add more variety to my condimental selections. Plus, I'd like to perfect my cigar rolling skills.

After years of growing and cooking what we grow, with most of our foods coming from our land, I like to get nerdy with the tobacco, with flu curing, fire curing, air cure, etc... It's interesting to see how the different processes affect the smoke. It helps me better understand what has happened to the tobacco in the tins.

Most have this concept that blending is really hard, but I've found that it is really more about playing around. A dab of this, a dab of that. I rarely ever try to make something taste like something else, just enjoy the serendipity of the experience. This is how we cook also. You won't find measuring cups or spoons in our kitchen. We just put a sprig of this, a pinch of that, and a dash of this. If we like the meal, we remember what all went into it, and get something close again next time. Same with tobacco blending. Curing and processing is a bit different. There, I have to take notes and follow charts. Same with curing sweet potatoes, onions, or garlic. I think commercial blenders have a harder time, because they have to take a test sample recipe and apply it to a larger scale, and duplicate that over and over. But, someone just blending for themself doesn't have any of those obligations.
 

Humblepipe

Lifer
Sep 13, 2019
1,874
6,876
Guerneville, CA
I really enjoy blending tobacco that I've grown as well. I am currently smoking more in rotation of what I have done myself. Sometimes, I wish that it was more legal to share them, because there's a joy or pride that comes from having someone compliment something that I've created from dirt and seed... an affirmation that I've made something good.

I've been thinking more about getting more variety of cigar leaf from one of the whole leaf places, so that I can add more variety to my condimental selections. Plus, I'd like to perfect my cigar rolling skills.

After years of growing and cooking what we grow, with most of our foods coming from our land, I like to get nerdy with the tobacco, with flu curing, fire curing, air cure, etc... It's interesting to see how the different processes affect the smoke. It helps me better understand what has happened to the tobacco in the tins.

Most have this concept that blending is really hard, but I've found that it is really more about playing around. A dab of this, a dab of that. I rarely ever try to make something taste like something else, just enjoy the serendipity of the experience. This is how we cook also. You won't find measuring cups or spoons in our kitchen. We just put a sprig of this, a pinch of that, and a dash of this. If we like the meal, we remember what all went into it, and get something close again next time. Same with tobacco blending. Curing and processing is a bit different. There, I have to take notes and follow charts. Same with curing sweet potatoes, onions, or garlic. I think commercial blenders have a harder time, because they have to take a test sample recipe and apply it to a larger scale, and duplicate that over and over. But, someone just blending for themself doesn't have any of those obligations.

Partly inspired by your growing/blending efforts, I purchased some tobacco seeds a few months back. It was a ludicrous idea, as I live amongst the Northern CA Redwoods. Hardly a climate conducive to tobacco growing. And, though I have 20 acres or so, it is mountainous with little open land. A man has a dream - LOL.

I find I enjoy VAPER and "Oriental" blends, so my blends tend to be along those lines. I do not attempt to duplicate anything commercially available. I did research suggested types of tobaccos and suggested ratios for different blends. I vaguely follow those guidelines. I am probably breaking lots of rules, but it is fun. I have no desire to create the same thing twice. Going back to my original posting, I suppose I want to take my blending to the next level. Maybe purchasing whole leaf tobacco is the way to go, since I can not grow tobacco myself. I could then play around with flu curing, fire curing, air cure, etc.
 
I could then play around with flu curing, fire curing, air cure, etc.
I may be mistaken, but I think that whole leaf will come already cured. You can't color cure or fire cure, once the leaf has been set. But, I would defer to @rajangan 's knowledge on that.

Heck, if they can grow those big ass redwoods there, you should be able to grow tobacco. Anywhere tomatoes can grow, tobacco can grow. Maybe you can grow some 200' tall there, ha ha.
 

Humblepipe

Lifer
Sep 13, 2019
1,874
6,876
Guerneville, CA
I may be mistaken, but I think that whole leaf will come already cured. You can't color cure or fire cure, once the leaf has been set. But, I would defer to @rajangan 's knowledge on that.

"Heck, if they can grow those big ass redwoods there, you should be able to grow tobacco. Anywhere tomatoes can grow, tobacco can grow. Maybe you can grow some 200' tall there, ha ha."

Now you've got me obsessing again - LOL. Where are those damn seeds I purchased?! Seriously, might try it out in the Spring.
 

F4RM3R

Part of the Furniture Now
Nov 28, 2019
567
2,513
38
Canada
Partly inspired by your growing/blending efforts, I purchased some tobacco seeds a few months back. It was a ludicrous idea, as I live amongst the Northern CA Redwoods. Hardly a climate conducive to tobacco growing. And, though I have 20 acres or so, it is mountainous with little open land. A man has a dream - LOL.

I find I enjoy VAPER and "Oriental" blends, so my blends tend to be along those lines. I do not attempt to duplicate anything commercially available. I did research suggested types of tobaccos and suggested ratios for different blends. I vaguely follow those guidelines. I am probably breaking lots of rules, but it is fun. I have no desire to create the same thing twice. Going back to my original posting, I suppose I want to take my blending to the next level. Maybe purchasing whole leaf tobacco is the way to go, since I can not grow tobacco myself. I could then play around with flu curing, fire curing, air cure, etc.
I'm up in Vancouver Canada and can grow no problem up here so you should be able to as well. I do have to start my seeds ahead of time in end of February or March.

Whole leaf is lots of fun to take another step of processing/ creating if you desire. The tobacco will already be flue/fire/air cured though. Similar to what most tobacco houses or blenders would receive. Stoving, steaming, pressing, casing topping is what you would do be doing. Trying to get the most out of a leaf or tweaking it to enhance certain flavours.
 

Humblepipe

Lifer
Sep 13, 2019
1,874
6,876
Guerneville, CA
I'm up in Vancouver Canada and can grow no problem up here so you should be able to as well. I do have to start my seeds ahead of time in end of February or March.

Whole leaf is lots of fun to take another step of processing/ creating if you desire. The tobacco will already be flue/fire/air cured though. Similar to what most tobacco houses or blenders would receive. Stoving, steaming, pressing, casing topping is what you would do be doing. Trying to get the most out of a leaf or tweaking it to enhance certain flavours.

This is why I appreciate this forum. Thanks for the info. I got just a tiny bit smarter today :)
 

rajangan

Part of the Furniture Now
Feb 14, 2018
974
2,809
Edmonton, AB
I may be mistaken, but I think that whole leaf will come already cured. You can't color cure or fire cure, once the leaf has been set. But, I would defer to @rajangan 's knowledge on that.

Heck, if they can grow those big ass redwoods there, you should be able to grow tobacco. Anywhere tomatoes can grow, tobacco can grow. Maybe you can grow some 200' tall there, ha ha.
Indeed. If it's smokable, I mean, if it will burn, it's already cured.
 

Effortlessdepths

Part of the Furniture Now
Feb 7, 2020
502
1,062
Micanopy, FL
I've gotten into blending (mixing and pressing, really) as well and really enjoy my own blends. I live in Florida, and my wife and I have a small, semi-homestead setup and grow all of our vegetables and fruits so we are fairly handy with gardening. This upcoming year we will attempt growing our own tobacco and I'm looking forward to the journey. I'd love to press our own plugs and cut our own flakes, come up with casing recipes and experiment not only with Virginia and Burley but possibly some more obscure varietals like rustica or Orinoco. No doubt I will be reaming these forums and the fairtradetobacco forums as well! You can expect me to bug you too, Cosmic! If you don't mind
 

smknron

Can't Leave
Sep 9, 2019
316
1,929
61
West Central Florida
From what I've learned about blending, is to write down the parts and or weights of each different type of tobacco that you add to your targeted blend. I have come up with a really good blend and for the life of me, I could not duplicate it again. Now the first thing I do, is get my notebook and pen before I start. Blending isn't easy that's for sure, but it sure is nice when you make your own.
 
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kola

Lifer
Apr 1, 2014
1,548
2,401
Colorado Rockies, Cripple Creek region
I prefer to let the blenders blend, although it could be fun and advantageous for some. Or a trainwreck. The only thing I do on rare occasion is put a tad of one blend on top of my bowl with a larger portion of another blend below it. i.e. I'll often put a little bit of Syrian leaf on top of FVF or Union Square.
 

Jimmy_Jack

Can't Leave
Jun 24, 2021
420
1,493
I’m going to start doin this. Rolled my own cigars for a while. Got pretty decent for a white guy. Now I want to do some pipe blends.