Dark-Fired, Cavendish: Usually Burley?

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mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
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Dark-fired and Cavendish, I think it is correct to say, are processes, not specific kinds of tobacco leaf. But do these usually use burley, or do both burley and Virginia sometimes end up processed these ways? I've often wondered, and it seems both are sometimes used, but I'm not sure. I can nearly always learn something on Forums, after all these years. Any idea why the base leaf isn't always identified?

 

anthonyrosenthal74

Preferred Member
Jan 8, 2013
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Dark Fired is dark fired Kentucky burley. Cavendish is (these days, I suppose) usually burley based, but there are virginia based cavendishes as well.

 

dcon

Preferred Member
Mar 16, 2019
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Jacksonville, FL
I prefer VA cavendish. Dobie’s Four Square Cavendish and GH Black Cavendish are my two favorite VA cavendish. This is generally considered European style cavendish as opposed to burley being the American cavendish. VA cavendish has also been an important component to a lot of great mixes. I realize its other uses but, I usually consider burley based cavendish as a base for aromatics or as syrupy Green River style cavendish.

 

ray47

Preferred Member
Jul 10, 2015
1,270
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Dark Fired is dark fired Kentucky burley. Cavendish is (these days, I suppose) usually burley based, but there are virginia based cavendishes as well.
^^^^^^^THIS^^^^^^^^^

 

chilllucky

Senior Member
Jul 15, 2018
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Chicago, IL, USA
scoosa.com
"Dark Fired" is a product that is made with a process - fire curing. To say Dark Fired is to imply one of a handful of burley varietals grown in a handful of counties in Kentucky in more or less similar soils and climes and cured using the smoke from smoldering fires of domestic hardwoods.
Another fire cured product is Latakia; which implies an oriental varietal of leaf from Syria or Cyprus cured over local woods and plants.
Any leaf can be fire cured or pressed and steamed into a cavendish. Even though there are popular implications to those terms.

 

pitchfork

Preferred Member
May 25, 2012
3,847
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Darks are strains of tobacco, related to burleys. They're a little darker, though.


 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
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1,670
These posts really scratch the itch of my curiosity. Thank you.