Choosing a Puppy Today

Log in

SmokingPipes.com Updates

Watch for Updates Twice a Week

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

Country Squire Banner

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

Merton

Senior Member
Jul 8, 2020
494
1,358
Boston, Massachusetts
happy day! Both the outside and the inside of a dog are good for the inside of a person. My grouchy and much loved Welsh Terrier just turned 10. Happy to have her at my side and that she made it to 10, but know, sadly, that a dog's life span is more limited than our own. We lost our beloved and sweet bulldog at 7.5 last year. Miss him every single day. My wife longs to get a bulldog pup . She did tell me that if I put an inground pool in the backyard and bought her a bulldog pup for three years in a row that she would always be nice to me. It may be an offer which I can't refuse.
One other thought, please consider insurance for your new dog , especially if it is a breed which is prone to certain health difficulties. I had a great experience with a company called Trupanion (I do not, by the way, work for them). The cost is relatively small and sometimes it provides the ability to make a good decision about you dog's care rather than the decision that you do not want to make.
 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
36,138
37,398
My best advice is to take your time, and even go back with others or alone for a second visit. You don't want to get this wrong and have to return a pup who think's he or she has found a home. In some sense, you want the animal to choose you. Some are gregarious for a family group (of people) and others are one-person dogs. Some that are reserved have excellent personalities, but are just quiet. I could go on and on, but you get the idea. Pay attention to what the dog thinks of you. This really counts. Labs tend to be sweet and amiable, so you will have to pay close attention to detect the differences in the pups. These animals are thinking individuals, as you know.
 

Sweet Home Alabama

Preferred Member
Mar 2, 2021
2,296
8,322
Alabama USA
My best advice is to take your time, and even go back with others or alone for a second visit. You don't want to get this wrong and have to return a pup who think's he or she has found a home. In some sense, you want the animal to choose you. Some are gregarious for a family group (of people) and others are one-person dogs. Some that are reserved have excellent personalities, but are just quiet. I could go on and on, but you get the idea. Pay attention to what the dog thinks of you. This really counts. Labs tend to be sweet and amiable, so you will have to pay close attention to detect the differences in the pups. These animals are thinking individuals, as you know.
Thank you. This one has to be large family and children oriented. I’m taking two grandchildren and a daughter.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JOHN72

pepesdad1

Preferred Member
Feb 28, 2013
1,007
598
Yes to a new pup, and as kcghost said...consider a rescue. Those have been my choice always because as mso489 said...These animals are thinking individuals, as you know. They will love you for the rescue from a concrete jail where they are in a holding pattern...think of how you would feel if you were suddenly there instead of loving life.
 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
36,138
37,398
Our four-legged friends have been rescues, lately from a rescue group at a pet store, and before that at a county facility and a kitten stray off the street. Except for the stray, we have gotten to know the animal(s) before adoption, and it has turned out well. I found my county rescue online, but I spent a long time with him at the pound. By the time we left, the bond was strong. One of the pet store candidates fell asleep with me holding his paw, and then at the behest of the rescue group, he brought along his brother for company.
 

Merton

Senior Member
Jul 8, 2020
494
1,358
Boston, Massachusetts
Yes to a new pup, and as kcghost said...consider a rescue. Those have been my choice always because as mso489 said...These animals are thinking individuals, as you know. They will love you for the rescue from a concrete jail where they are in a holding pattern...think of how you would feel if you were suddenly there instead of loving life.
I don't disagree. However, folks who appreciate the many wonderful qualities (appearance, demeanor and skills of a particular breed are now sort of virtue shamed and rescue only folks feel so superior.
 

lawdawg

Preferred Member
Aug 25, 2016
1,793
3,737
I don't disagree. However, folks who appreciate the many wonderful qualities (appearance, demeanor and skills of a particular breed are now sort of virtue shamed and rescue only folks feel so superior.

I know what you mean, but when you've got a great dog, who cares what anyone else thinks about it puffy

I've got a "rescue cat" that my wife and I literally rescued off the street. I've posted about him here before. He had a bad open wound that was infected, and some other problems, and although he looked okay it was pretty clear that he was gonna be in serious trouble without some medical attention. He ended up needing to have his tail amputated, a round of antibiotics, and numerous rounds of anti-parasite treatments. Spent about $1,000 on vet bills in the first couple months patching him up. That was a few years ago.

His favorite thing to do is still to sit on my lap and gaze up at me lovingly. My wife comments on it routinely to the point that sometimes I wonder whether she might be projecting some of her feelings onto him. He just sits on my lap, looks at me, and starts purring. He also follows us around the house, and sleeps at the foot of our bed about every night. If my wife and I are in the bathroom, 9 times out of 10, our cat will be in there with us. Of course it doesn't hurt that I'm also the one who feeds him most of the time, so I'm sure that informs his opinion of me as well puffy

As a guy with a rescue animal, I would not think less at all of someone with a well-bred purebred dog. If/when we get another dog, unless we can find an exceptional shelter dog (which are few and far between), we'll go with a purebred from a good line.
 

Merton

Senior Member
Jul 8, 2020
494
1,358
Boston, Massachusetts
I know what you mean, but when you've got a great dog, who cares what anyone else thinks about it puffy

I've got a "rescue cat" that my wife and I literally rescued off the street. I've posted about him here before. He had a bad open wound that was infected, and some other problems, and although he looked okay it was pretty clear that he was gonna be in serious trouble without some medical attention. He ended up needing to have his tail amputated, a round of antibiotics, and numerous rounds of anti-parasite treatments. Spent about $1,000 on vet bills in the first couple months patching him up. That was a few years ago.

His favorite thing to do is still to sit on my lap and gaze up at me lovingly. My wife comments on it routinely to the point that sometimes I wonder whether she might be projecting some of her feelings onto him. He just sits on my lap, looks at me, and starts purring. He also follows us around the house, and sleeps at the foot of our bed about every night. If my wife and I are in the bathroom, 9 times out of 10, our cat will be in there with us. Of course it doesn't hurt that I'm also the one who feeds him most of the time, so I'm sure that informs his opinion of me as well puffy

As a guy with a rescue animal, I would not think less at all of someone with a well-bred purebred dog. If/when we get another dog, unless we can find an exceptional shelter dog (which are few and far between), we'll go with a purebred from a good line.
I really don't care what others think. I happen to have a great love for three breeds: Airedale Terriers, Welsh Terriers and English Bulldogs. I have had a rescue dog as well and, of course, loved that dog . I have also had the occasion, more than once, to chat with fellow dog walkers who inquire as to my dog breed and then puff up and tell me that Rescue is the only way to go. Sort of like people who cough when they see a pipe but could not even remotely be effected by it. Holier than thou types.
 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
36,138
37,398
With pedigree animals, I'd just lean against "puppy mills." People who really favor a breed and breed them at home usually provide wonderful animals. With rescues, you do get some genetic mixing for hybrid vigor, which has its advantages. Ironically, the two male cats we have were rescued out of a drainpipe. There was clearly a Maine Coon involved in their parentage, and they look for all the world like pedigrees. The Maine Coon site went crazy for them ... we just wanted to share, not make some kind of a point. The underground dog fighting circuit has introduced large numbers of pit bull mixes into the rescue population, but the vast majority of these dogs are wonderful animals, not aggressive or problematical with kids at all. One I know of is trained as an emotional support animal and does a fine job, comes to class with her person and is well mannered and easygoing.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lawdawg

pepesdad1

Preferred Member
Feb 28, 2013
1,007
598
As a guy with a rescue animal, I would not think less at all of someone with a well-bred purebred dog. I'm not shaming anyone for getting what they want...that is not what this is about...taking care of animals requires that you give of yourself. Whether it is a pure bred or a rescue, enjoy them both depending on your needs.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Merton