Chicken Chaseing time.

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Nov 27, 2018
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Interesting trivia: Some roots of the tradition of coffee with chicory can be traced back to the American Civil War. When the South was blockaded by the United States Navy, imported goods (like coffee) became an ever-dwindling (and eventually non-existent) and very expensive luxury provided only by blockade-runners, (fast vessels smuggling goods from overseas), so that most people had to make do with coffee substitutes, the most popular being wild chicory along with ground nuts and corn.

 

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jpmcwjr

Preferred Member
May 12, 2015
15,709
5,794
Monterey Peninsula
Ah, yeah, chicory coffee with steamed milk and beignets in The Quarter! Hard to beat.
And, madox, that isn't a lacrosse stick! But close. (Used to play, coach and ref the game.)

 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
19,941
5,452
Outer Space
I love everything about Louisiana and New Orleans. I used to visit much more frequently, but I have never understood the infatuation that tourists have with them damn beignets. Put some powdered sugar on a biscuit, voila. But, everybody has to try them when they get there. I'm just not going to be one to lie to you. It ain't nothing but a dry biscuit. :puffy:

 

ssjones

Moderator
Staff member
May 11, 2011
14,682
1,258
Maryland
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Yep, I don't get beignets or chickory coffee, Cafe Du Monde in the Quarter is just down right filthy.

But, I'll eat every LA oyster they put in front of me!(just don't ruin them with that charbroiled nonsense)

 

rdavid

Preferred Member
Jun 30, 2018
648
3
Milton, FL
Was that Boudin with Natty Light and a coon ass mask...
Hah... Now your talking. I understand that perfectly!
Many years working in deep southern Louisiana. "Down da bayou". I've been all over the planet and have yet to experience anything like the genuine Cajun folk and their lifestyle.
And by the way, New Orleans definitely isn't Cajun.

 
Dec 11, 2018
257
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I've been all over the planet and have yet to experience anything like the genuine Cajun folk and their lifestyle.
If you ever get that way, you should visit the South Carolina Lowcountry; lived there for quite a while before I moved north to North Carolina, my wife and I still go back many times every year (for fishing, eating and drinking primarily). A very similar culture to southern MS/AL/LA, i.e., good southerners but obviously not cajun (heritage greatly influenced by the Scots, the Gullah, and rejected English classes) Good people that have your back with no bullshit. Good food (seafood, catfish, pork BBQ, greens with fatback, etc.) also with no bullshit. To them, life is not very complicated, just something you live and enjoy (good times with the bad). I've always thought it a shame others can't enjoy simplicity like they do...I do try my best though.

 

pappymac

Preferred Member
Feb 26, 2015
1,968
273
Put some powdered sugar on a biscuit, voila.
Cosmic - You have to fry the biscuit to make it a beignet then add the powdered sugar. Or you can fry the biscuit, poke a hole in it and fill it with honey to make a Sopapilla.
And by the way, New Orleans definitely isn't Cajun.
Correct. New Orleans is Creole. The cajuns are in the bayous west of the Mississippi river (mostly what is considered the Atchafalaya River basin.) from the coastline north to about where Opelousa is and then west to the Texas border.

 

rdavid

Preferred Member
Jun 30, 2018
648
3
Milton, FL
Good food (seafood, catfish, pork BBQ, greens with fatback, etc.) also with no bullshit. To them, life is not very complicated, just something you live and enjoy (good times with the bad). I've always thought it a shame others can't enjoy simplicity like they do...I do try my best though.
Couldn't have said it better myself. It's funny because I used to be depressed working in southern Louisiana and thought of it as very near a third world country. The longer I spend there, the more I appreciate the culture and the simple lifestyle. Cajun people in general don't take kindly to strangers but once you make friends with them, they will give you the shirt off their back and are friends for life. I lived there for years but I just couldn't stand the roads. My poor Harley was getting killed down there! I now have a whole different outlook and am glad to work there now and even entertain the idea of moving back but my heart really lies in Kentucky and/or Tennessee. Funny because far eastern Kentucky reminds me of the Cajun people but in the mountains!
Anyway, I too admire the simplistic outlook and like you, strive to filter out the bullshit. My time with the pipe really allows me to reflect on this too.
Also, I married a born and raised Cajun woman! She's the best but damn... don't ever piss off a Cajun woman. Geeezzz...

 

rdavid

Preferred Member
Jun 30, 2018
648
3
Milton, FL
The cajuns are in the bayous west of the Mississippi river (mostly what is considered the Atchafalaya River basin.) from the coastline north to about where Opelousa is and then west to the Texas border.
Yes. I think of anything west of the Mississippi and south of I-10 as "real" Cajun. The Atachafalaya Basin is absolutely beautiful and it amazes me on how the Cajun people eked out a life there. The history behind how they came to inhabit the Atchafalaya is also interesting.
Best crawfish comes from there and I go out of my way to get it. "Spillway crawfish" as it is referred to by the locals vs crawfish raised in ponds.

 

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