Charred bowl?

Log in

SmokingPipes.com Updates

Watch for Updates Twice a Week

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

Tobacco Treasures Ad

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

Tobacco Treasures Ad

Jjliver

Lurker
Mar 8, 2022
1
0
Can anyone suggest how to rid this bowl of what appears to be a charred bowl? I tried saliva but it made no difference.

Thanks in advance!
 

Attachments

  • 77366AFA-91AC-4B9B-8F31-6E61CEBAF24C.jpeg
    77366AFA-91AC-4B9B-8F31-6E61CEBAF24C.jpeg
    108.9 KB · Views: 35
  • 580ED01D-D14D-45C0-8557-1C6564C11125.jpeg
    580ED01D-D14D-45C0-8557-1C6564C11125.jpeg
    118.8 KB · Views: 35

AJL67

Lifer
May 26, 2022
2,035
11,162
Florida - Space Coast
Here i just did part of this rim for an example. It was all black like the black side (duh right lol) this is about 30 seconds of spit and a paper towel. Sorry i didn’t do total before and after but to be honest i didn’t think about it and this should be example enough.

FC810042-350F-4FC3-91C5-64C1CF40DCC6.jpeg
 
  • Like
Reactions: edger

phdaemon

Lurker
May 31, 2022
47
77
Hello. I restore pipes as a hobby and have done some pretty decent removal of charred bowls.

Attached are some examples.

There's a couple of steps you can take.
  • For light charring, you can use a rag and just spit, put some elbow grease into it, and eventually you'll get a lot of the charring out. This really only works for smooth pipes.
  • For heavy charring, you're gonna need a couple of things. Get a copper wire brush, and gently brush the surface where the charring is. To smooth it out you can use a very high grit micromesh pad (like 4000+). You don't want to do it too hard because you'll end up sanding off the finish (if there's any). You really only want to remove the char. After you do that, you're going to use Restoration Balm from La Belle Epoque (La Belle Epoque Pens - https://lbepens.webs.com/apps/webstore/products/show/7791505). Let it set for about 15 minutes then rub it off.
  • For textured / rusticated / etc pipes (anything that's not a smooth surface where the charring is) you're gonna follow the same process as heavy charring, except no micromesh pad.
Hopefully this helps. Good luck!
 

Attachments

  • original-1.jpeg
    original-1.jpeg
    36.7 KB · Views: 8
  • PXL_20220901_210715935.PORTRAIT.jpg
    PXL_20220901_210715935.PORTRAIT.jpg
    72.2 KB · Views: 10
  • original.jpeg
    original.jpeg
    27.1 KB · Views: 10
  • PXL_20220901_211150533.jpg
    PXL_20220901_211150533.jpg
    80.9 KB · Views: 12
  • ViggoNielsen-RESTORED.png
    ViggoNielsen-RESTORED.png
    438.9 KB · Views: 12
  • CharatanSelect-RESTORED.png
    CharatanSelect-RESTORED.png
    333.9 KB · Views: 13

phdaemon

Lurker
May 31, 2022
47
77
It may be helpful to use strict terms. Actual charring is when the briar is permanently damaged. Short of that, it's lava, tar, etc.
This is good to know. I always referred to permanent damage (inside the chamber) as burn out. But lava and tar make sense to use in the context of this thread (outside the chamber).

Thanks for the knowledge!
 

peteguy

Lifer
Jan 19, 2012
1,293
429
Non "flame/heat damage" pipe you must go slow and use patience. If it is just "gunk" it will eventually come off. If you go with with extra abrasive, go hard or fast, you will chance removing some stain. I just use a wet sponge and rest the pipe bowl opening down on the sponge.

If its the other damage then you have to repair or live with it how it is.