Bruyere Definition

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Bengel

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Sep 20, 2019
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This could get downright pedantic, maybe we can raise the level of the forum, in the eyes of the educated.
 
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jojoc

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May 10, 2019
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Beyond the actual definition, I believe some pipe brands have used it to designate a specific finish or line of pipes within the brand.
 
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BROBS

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yes.. if you see something referred to as a "Bruyere Type Finish" it's glossy red.
If it's a pipe that says GENUINE BRUYERE they are just meaning it's real briar. with all these stamps there must have been some fake briar back in the day lol
 
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shanez

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Jul 10, 2018
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yes.. if you see something referred to as a "Bruyere Type Finish" it's glossy red.
If it's a pipe that says GENUINE BRUYERE they are just meaning it's real briar. with all these stamps there must have been some fake briar back in the day lol
The article in the link I posted above talks about WWII causing manufacturers to turn to alternative woods. I would hazard a guess there were some less than scrupulous manufacturers who were not honest about their pipes which lead to the use by others of both the terms genuine and guaranteed.
 
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BROBS

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I always thought a pipe made out of bakelite was goofy because of the high concentration of formaldehyde in that particular material.
 

jpmcwjr

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May 12, 2015
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Here's a pipe stamped Bakelite:11842

But the other side says French Briar.11843

So, probably not too dangerous. The stem is a bit translucent, so perhaps it's not original. Or maybe bakelite can be made so.
 
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BROBS

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looks more like redmanol which is a form of bakelite.
I meant the pipes that were made entirely of bakelite.. they existed! Kind of precursor to brylon etc.
 

mso489

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Feb 21, 2013
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Yes, during WWII, the briar growing/harvesting areas were combat zones, so other woods were used for tobacco pipes, such as maple, which is still used, and Mountain Laurel which is only still used by a few pipe carvers. Mountain Laurel is extremely durable and handsome, but probably did not continue much in use because it does not display its grain like briar. For decades after WWII, U.S. made pipes often had a stamp that said "Imported Briar," to point out that the briar was the real thing. Though other members may own them, I am the only member I know of who talks about owning Mountain Laurel pipes, four or five of them.
 
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chasingembers

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Nov 12, 2014
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Emberland
This could get downright pedantic, maybe we can raise the level of the forum, in the eyes of the educated.
You mean like incorrectly calling the chamber the bowl when the bowl of a pipe is the section of the stummel that the chamber is drilled into?

To the OP, briar is an English corruption of the French "bruyere", much like how English speakers mangled "el lagarto" into alligator.
 
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