British Buttner Reamer

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lawdawg

Preferred Member
Aug 25, 2016
1,109
1,260
I have yet to allow any of pipes to accumulate any real cake over time. A paper towel and some grain alcohol tends to keep it in check. I have been curious though about developing and maintaining a cake to see if it adds anything to the experience, though on the occasions I've let any of my pipes begin to develop a cake, I've not noticed any difference at all in how they smoke.
 

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georged

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Mar 7, 2013
2,798
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I still fail to understand how that would fully work.
Two blades is the only way to go when cake is really thick.

To keep things trimmed (think a golf course cutting their greens twice a day), a single triangular blade like the old Savinelli is best.

The four blade expander type makes an excellent "bowl grabber" for gluing and refinishing but little else.
 

BROBS

Preferred Member
Nov 13, 2019
6,674
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Two blades is the only way to go when cake is really thick.

To keep things trimmed (think a golf course cutting their greens twice a day), a single triangular blade like the old Savinelli is best.

The four blade expander type makes an excellent "bowl grabber" for gluing and refinishing but little else.
I mean about how they can expand out to stay parallel with the walls of the chamber?
 

mngslvs

Member
Jan 24, 2019
182
319
I have used a British Buttner reamer for probably 45 years. It takes up almost no space, I have to be careful not to lose it. I don’t use a paper towel at the end of my smoke, so cake does build up eventually, and then the reamer is very handy. The key to understanding it is to know that the blade on each side, which is more like a scraper and not a blade, pivots in the middle, so that it conforms to the shape of the interior of the pipe. No instructions are needed. One gets the feel of it pretty quickly.
 

jpmcwjr

Preferred Member
May 12, 2015
16,531
7,403
Monterey Peninsula
The mechanics are straightforward, and the mechanism keeps the blades/scraper parallel as you slide them up or down the track.

I like it because it's small, works very well, and is not expensive.

I posted so folks could copy the instructions by downloading the jpeg. It was not mean to compare it with others, but no problem. I use it about every two years on pipes, all of which get flushed with hot water; very little cake build up.
 

jpmcwjr

Preferred Member
May 12, 2015
16,531
7,403
Monterey Peninsula
The mechanics are straightforward, and the mechanism keeps the blades/scraper parallel as you slide them up or down the track.

I like it because it's small, works very well, and is not expensive.

I posted so folks could copy the instructions by downloading the jpeg. It was not mean to compare it with others, but no problem. I use it about every two years on pipes, all of which get flushed with hot water; very little cake build up.
".....mechanism keeps the blades/scraper parallel as you slide them up or down the track...."

That's wrong. The blades do fan out a tad as you widen the scope of them.
 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
30,622
13,181
New pipe smokers just need to know to be cautious, go very easy with a reamer. It's fun to ream at first, and then many get carried away and take out some of the briar the pipe needs to function, and pretty soon there are grooves and marks that can start a burn-out process. I had an elderly friend who was the resident in a care facility who let a friend ream his pipes and ruin every one of them. A happy reamer is a dangerous reamer. I'm one of the minority that doesn't build cake, doesn't own a reamer. The bowls stay full size.
 

BROBS

Preferred Member
Nov 13, 2019
6,674
20,132
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New pipe smokers just need to know to be cautious, go very easy with a reamer. It's fun to ream at first, and then many get carried away and take out some of the briar the pipe needs to function, and pretty soon there are grooves and marks that can start a burn-out process. I had an elderly friend who was the resident in a care facility who let a friend ream his pipes and ruin every one of them. A happy reamer is a dangerous reamer. I'm one of the minority that doesn't build cake, doesn't own a reamer. The bowls stay full size.
There’s cake there. You just can’t tell. 👍
 
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