Barling with 2 part stummel.

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mawnansmiff

Lifer
Oct 14, 2015
6,525
4,566
Sunny Cornwall, UK.
Hello again chaps. Yet another pipe from my latest lucky dip box has revealed what I initially thought was just another Barling pipe. However whilst looking at the stampings under the microscope I spied that the bowl and shank are two different pieces of briar. It would be easily missed by the naked eye due to the sandblasting but it most certainly is there. Very evident in the last picture below.
The stampings on the bottom are an arched 'Barling's' over a straight 'Make'. Then there is a TP and further over is an EL. The stem has a just discernible crossed 'Barlings' stamp.
Can some kind expert please tell me what I have here and possibly give an age to it? The pipe by the way is ~ 14cm long.
I would also appreciate any tips on what to do about the nasty ding on top of the bowl in pic 3. I have considered wood filler but suspect there must be a better method so any suggestions would be most welcome.
The pipe is of course unrestored, I have only soaked the stem in Oxyclean.
Regards,
Jay.
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agnosticpipe

Lifer
Nov 3, 2013
3,056
2,092
In the sticks in Mississippi
OK Jay, I won't leave you hanging here. In my opinion, and this is just my opinion, I don't think that this pipe came from the factory that way. It looks like someone did a fairly decent job of replacing a broken shank on the pipe. I can see no reason that Barling would send out a pipe that is pieced together like that. But I suppose stranger things have happened.
About the chipped bowl top. Seeing as the chip is on the outside of the bowl you could probably use anything you want to patch it, as long as it would stay in place. I would first clean the whole stummel with alcohol and a stiff brush, or possibly some 0000 steel wool. Remove any dirt, grease etc. then patch the chip with wood putty trying to duplicate the blasting. You might want to apply some stain to the fill at this time. After that drys use some super glue with some briar dust on top. When that's dry, use a needle file or Dremel tool to touch up the sandblast pattern if needed. I'd then stain the whole pipe lightly using a little more to even out the difference in the shank. Oh well, that does sound like a lot of work, so maybe just clean the insides and smoke it. :roll:

 

buckaroo

Lifer
Sep 30, 2014
1,021
1,541
So. Cal.
With Jessie on sabbatical... If I remember right, some pipe houses used to replace worn out bowls for you. You don't see them too often, but this looks like it could be one as it looks like a first class job (you said you did not even realize it until closer inspection.) Chips on the outer bowl and ones that go that low are a tough fix. Top it? Na, it's an old pipe. Rock it like it is.

 

mawnansmiff

Lifer
Oct 14, 2015
6,525
4,566
Sunny Cornwall, UK.
Orley, many thanks for your input. Interesting though it sounds I thinks it's possibly a bit of a long shot (I can't personally offer any better reason though) that it is a repair. It seems to me to be an awful lot of work to do and probably at considerable cost, surely it would have been cheaper just to buy another pipe? I did inspect it further under the microscope and saw that the bulk of the sandblast around the joint marries up between sides if you get my drift.
As regards the ding in the bowl (outer only thankfully) I shall go the wood filler route as you suggested. Making a colour match will be tricky but I shall give it a go.
Buckaroo, I was hoping Jessie might see my post and offer some thoughts on the 'repair' and also a possible dating of the pipe. It has no shape number, just the EL which I take to be size and a TP which could be anything :?
I have since given the stummel a good scrub with oil soap and below is a close up of the stampings.
Thanks again chaps,
Regards,
Jay.
img_0006-25-600x399.jpg


 

papipeguy

Lifer
Jul 31, 2010
15,779
25
Bethlehem, Pa.
This is the repair on my Dunhill that billkay refers to. georged work a major miracle on this pipe. The other thing you could do is top the pipe off which would be a shame in my opinion.
http://pipesmagazine.com/forums/topic/replacing-missing-wood-heavily-damaged-patent-dunhill-pic-heavy

 
May 31, 2012
4,296
21
That's a very interesting Barling, looks like a pre-Fossil sandblast which is a fascinating topic, backalong.
You may be interested in this old Worthpoint listing:

http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/english-estate-pipe-barling-tp-m-pre-402135174

(Be sure to look at all the images too, has a great exploded view shot.)

...the relevant bit being this:

BARLING TP 15577 BH (250)

This is an extremely rare pre-Transition Barling in a small size with a big difference. The pipe was manufactured with a shank that unscrews from the bowl by means of what appears to be threaded bone. (See images) The mouthpiece attaches to the shank by an ordinary tenon. No doubt the stamping of TP refers to Two Piece, and the purpose may be to allow the pipe to be broken down to tuck in a small pocket. The pipe is clearly from no later than the 1950s and has the general appearance of a Barling from the 1930s or earlier.
:
It's too bad that Sable ain't around as I'm sure he's got the scoop and could provide further detail,

in the past he has said this in regard to the TP Barlings:

"That Dunhill reminds me of the Barling TP - Travel Pipe. The shank screws into the bowl right at the junction, and the stem twists into the mortise like a normal stem. When broken apart the pipe can fit neatly into a small pocket, like a watch pocket."
http://pipesmagazine.com/forums/topic/some-interesting-ebay-auctions-nov-29-2015#post-880871
:
Maybe Jon Guss will see this and weigh in.
Thank you for the pictures, the stampings are quite crisp and the blast is mighty fine.
The shank doesn't appear to line up, grain wise, so maybe it is a modified TP, a mod probably did a long time ago if indeed that's the case.
Is the shank mounted solidly?

Glued?

Have you perhaps tried to twist it?
My apologies for not being well-versed enough in Barlinglore to offer any more definitive information.
Allycumpooster zuggans.

:puffy:

 

jpmcwjr

Moderator
Staff member
May 12, 2015
22,310
21,463
Carmel Valley, CA
Perhaps done by an enthusiastic wood worker on his favorite pipe?
I did inspect it further under the microscope and saw that the bulk of the sandblast around the joint marries up between sides if you get my drift.
Not clear on your drift. The replacement stem doesn't look like the bowl's blast.

 

agnosticpipe

Lifer
Nov 3, 2013
3,056
2,092
In the sticks in Mississippi
Well I'll be dipped Jay! I have never seen such a critter! I guess Barling did send out pipes with two piece stummels. Always something to be learned, and with a member like misterlowercase coming to the rescue today is one of those days. Thanks to the both of you for posting this Barling pipe and info. :clap:

 

xrundog

Part of the Furniture Now
Oct 23, 2014
737
1
Ames, IA
I remember seeing a post about a smooth Barling like that recently. I think the consensus was that during the war when briar supply was short, pipes were made like that. They are not terribly uncommon.

 
May 31, 2012
4,296
21
I remember seeing a post about a smooth Barling like that recently. I think the consensus was that during the war when briar supply was short, pipes were made like that. They are not terribly uncommon.
That makes sense.

Got a link to the post?
-
Here's another Sablebrush quote on the topic:
"I have another of their unusual pipes, a TP - travel pipe - that breaks down into 3 pieces, stem, shank, and bowl. The shank screws into the bowl. The stem is a traditional vulcanite tenon twist stem. Disassembled you can easily tuck the pipe into a vest pocket, or a very tiny space. Perfect for your hiking kit!"
http://pipesmagazine.com/forums/topic/barlings-make-wbriar-stem#post-933797
:

 

mawnansmiff

Lifer
Oct 14, 2015
6,525
4,566
Sunny Cornwall, UK.
Well I'll be jiggered...the shank does indeed unscrew from the bowl!!! There is a black (nylon?) male screw in the shank the attaches it to the female end in the bowl.
Thank you so much Mr. Lowercase for making my day :worship: As it happens I did read the threads you mentioned some while ago (am working my way through all the threads on here). It's just that the penny didn't drop and I would never have guessed the shank would unscrew.
Earlier on in the day I restained the pipe and also filled in the chip with a tiny amount of wood filler (still drying) and tomorrow I hope to finish off the stem. I will of course post pics of the now three piece pipe :puffy:
Papipeguy, I did read that very thread on your pipe repair, astonishing work!
This here box of 28 estates I won last week has produced some amazing pipes, am so pleased I won the auction :D
I shall now celebrate by loading up another pipe I worked on today, a gorgeous blasted bent billiard by Ropp with the most graceful swan necked stem I ever saw :puffy:
Very many thanks chaps for your help here.
Regards,
Jay.
PS: I presume the pipe is circa 1950's, is that correct?

 

mawnansmiff

Lifer
Oct 14, 2015
6,525
4,566
Sunny Cornwall, UK.
It goes without saying I suppose but once the pipe was in two pieces I found a whole load of gunk that was hidden in the join, and I thought I had 'cleansed' the pipe :oops:
It is now clear of extra gunk so happy faces all round :puffy:
There are at least two more Barling's pipes in this box, a 411S 'Londoner' sandblast oval stemmed billiard with 'BB&S' on the stem (not sure what that stands for) and a rather nice rusticated meer billiard though this has no markings on the bowl, just the 'crossed' Barling's mark on the faux military stem with 'England' underneath.
Regards,
Jay.

 

xrundog

Part of the Furniture Now
Oct 23, 2014
737
1
Ames, IA
Can't find the post. I may be mis-remembering and it may have been about travel pipes. I do remember Sablebrush had the answer to the question. Whatever it was.

 

mawnansmiff

Lifer
Oct 14, 2015
6,525
4,566
Sunny Cornwall, UK.
Here we go folks as promised, three pictures of the travel pipe disassembled...again, thanks to Mr.Lowercase for pointing me in the right direction.
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Would I be correct in assuming the threaded piece to be made of nylon?
Regards,
Jay.

 

sablebrush52

The Bard Of Barlings
Jun 15, 2013
16,405
30,516
SoCal
jrs457.wixsite.com
This is a very interesting piece. Barling did make travel pipes with a shank that screwed into the bowl. But theirs were marked with the letters TP in caps. Also, the bowl section had a metal threaded collar into which one could screw or unscrew the shank. So this one is a puzzler, and my guess is that it's a later repair. The TP pipes that I have seen, and I also own one, were made by cutting the stummel at the join and then attaching the connectors. The result is that the join is nearly seamless because it's made from the original piece. This one is made from different pieces and the blasts don't match.

 

georged

Lifer
Mar 7, 2013
3,586
4,755
What Jesse said.
The end result of taking a one-piece stummel, cutting it into two parts, and then affixing connectors looks distinctively different than making each part independently from separate pieces of wood.
Cool find in any event. :D (I missed this thread when it was new)

 

mawnansmiff

Lifer
Oct 14, 2015
6,525
4,566
Sunny Cornwall, UK.
Thanks ever so much chaps but one query, if it is indeed a 'repair' then why on earth is it stamped TP (Travel Pipe)? I'm personally not convinced it's a repair.
Regards,
Jay.

 
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