Any Info on This Antique Meer?

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fluffie666

Senior Member
Apr 4, 2014
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I found it in an antique store. The shop owner knew it was something special and wouldn't even sell it to me. I believe it's from the late 1800's. Anyone have a clue on these?
Fixed thread title, please see rule number 9. Pertinent portion: Please capitalize words in the thread titles. Thank you, Robert.

 

fluffie666

Senior Member
Apr 4, 2014
498
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http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/petekestatepipes/media/Mobile%20Uploads/20160326_142017-1_zpss59xndvc.jpg.html?filters[user]=142748386&filters[recent]=1&sort=1&o=0
Here's the link. I can't post pics.

 

jpmcwjr

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May 12, 2015
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This is a way to add photos to your post:
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fluffie666

Senior Member
Apr 4, 2014
498
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Hot damn! $20? Sold! The pic doesn't do it justice. Up close it looks just like a newer Grabow.
Seriously though, it's not on my hands. I was on an estate pipe hunt at some antique stores near me. I came across that thing. I didn't end up buying it. I'm just trying to learn a little bit about the company that made it. My research tells me it was made in the later part of the 1800's by the only American company to ever make quality meers.

 

mawnansmiff

Preferred Member
Oct 14, 2015
4,794
1
Sunny Cornwall, UK.
"I found it in an antique store. The shop owner knew it was something special and wouldn't even sell it to me."
So why have it in his shop in the first place if he has no plans on selling the thing?
Am puzzled :roll:
Regards,
Jay.

 

doctorbob

Preferred Member
Mar 18, 2014
583
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There is a shop in Lansing, Michigan in which 90 percent of the good stuff isn't for sale. Most of the rest is junk. The owner thinks that it drives business, with people coming to see his 'collection', I'll never go back.
Doc

 

fluffie666

Senior Member
Apr 4, 2014
498
0
The shop owner told me he knew it was "something" but didn't know what. He had no idea what it might be worth. I'm just gathering some info for him so he might be able to sell it. On top of that, I just like learning about pipes. I lost interest in owning it after I found out it was over $20 lol. Interesting story behind the pipe nonetheless.

 

xrundog

Preferred Member
Oct 23, 2014
737
0
Ames, IA
Yeah, it's a cheroot holder. I think those were hot items for about ten years during the art nouveau era. Obviously it's a good quality item. The carving is nice, all the pieces seem to be there and it's in nice condition. Should be valuable, right? Not really. I'm sure people collect those. But the market for those things must be pretty narrow. I'd be surprised if it broke $100 on eBay. And I think that's the widest possible auction market for cheroot holders. But that's really just an impression from casual observation. I haven't really studied that market.

I'd buy it if the price was low enough. I'd even have a go and use it. But do I really want something like that? Is it a must have item? No. For most pipers or cigar guys it would be an impulse buy based on the perception deal too good to pass by.

 

gnesiohamartolos

New member
Jan 10, 2014
48
1
This cheroot (cigar) holder was made by P. J. Kaldenberg. He was a part of the F. W. Kaldenberg & Sons of New York family, one of the largest meerschaum pipe carvers in the United States. It claimed to be the first to bring meerschaum to America beginning in 1855. William Demuth Co. alone matched the Kaldenberg companies in size. Based on The Art Collector: A Journal Devoted to the Arts and the Crafts, Alfred Trumble, ed., vol. 1-2 (1889), p. 46, it appears that a number of separate companies formed Kaldenberg Brothers that produced meerschaum carvings that were superior to those of the Viennese masters. Chief among them was Fritz R. Kaldenberg won first place at the 1865 American Institute and 1867 Exposition Universelle and the Grand Prix in Paris in 1887. In April, 1893, F. W. Kaldenberg was one of the wealthiest meerschaum manufacturers in New York. Three Kaldenbergs were on its board: Frederick Julius, Frederick R. and Guiodo F. This holder was probably carved sometime between 1867 and 1887 based on the two of the three awards printed on the cover fabric.

 
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