Allergic To Red Virginia

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shanez

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Jul 10, 2018
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It is possible to be allergic to a plant based on how it is processed.

For example, a person can be allergic to strawberries but not after they've been frozen.

The allergy might be to a specific enzyme within the plant and the enzyme may be destroyed by various processes.
 

sablebrush52

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You can’t be.

unless you’re allergic to all VA tobacco? It all comes off the same plant.

new term for those “allergic” to red VA: “sensitives”
Tell that to Harris. He can smoke any kind of Virginia except Red, which burns his mouth like an acetylene torch. Many people can't smoke Reds. I used to have this issue with bright Virginias, but fortunately the sensitivity went away and I can smoke any kind of Virginia.
 

BROBS

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Nov 13, 2019
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It is possible to be allergic to a plant based on how it is processed.

For example, a person can be allergic to strawberries but not after they've been frozen.

The allergy might be to a specific enzyme within the plant and the enzyme may be destroyed by various processes.
If it was an “allergy” your throat would close and you’d swell up. Not just get tongue bite.
 

shanez

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If it was an “allergy” your throat would close and you’d swell up. Not just get tongue bite.
Nope.

All allergies are a matter of sensitivity. It's still an allergic reaction. Most people who are stung by a bee get an itchy red lump as an allergic reaction. A small fraction of people have their throats swell shut in response to the reaction. A few people are somewhere in between. The reaction is unique to the person.
 

BROBS

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Also, some people simply develop sores (hives) inside their mouths from eating nuts while other swell up and have their throats shut.
So if you drink orange juice and get a raw mouth is it an allergy?

I don’t think what is happening with smoking red VA is an allergy.
 
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canucklehead

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Aug 1, 2018
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It is possible to be allergic to a plant based on how it is processed.

For example, a person can be allergic to strawberries but not after they've been frozen.

The allergy might be to a specific enzyme within the plant and the enzyme may be destroyed by various processes.
Theoretically, if that was the case in someone's red Virginia sensitivity, then it it could be tested for by smoking something like stoved or Cavendished red Virginias were most enzymes would be destroyed. If they still caused severe issues then it could narrowed down to a chemical irritant (assuming the person in question smokes perfectly and no problems are caused by technique).

The next question would be what specific chemical compounds are present in red Virginias but not other tobaccos?
 

unadoptedlamp

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Mar 19, 2014
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I'm pretty sure shanez is correct on this one. I've never had allergic reactions in all my life -to anything- Not even hay fever or anything seasonal... until I was stung by bees back to back in one week a few years ago. The second time, my hands swelled up like literal balloons.

Since then, I developed "oral allergy syndrome" to plums and cherries. It is basically just an itchy mouth. On rare occasions (because I still eat them), I have broken out in hives. Goes away after an hour or so, but it seems to be related to whether they are fresh off the tree or not. I can eat them dried, in jam, cooked, or older (most of the time) without issue.

A doctor prescribed me an epi pen, in case I one day kick over into a crazy reaction, which he said is possible at any time. Just be ready for the chance it can happen, was his advice.

So, unless I am unusual, I am a living example of how allergies can shift and change by degree over time. But, there is also medical literature to back this up. I got interested when it impacted me. Strange stuff, allergies.

Take away point: If you have an unusual reaction to something, I would be extra cautious the next go round. Way it was explained to me is that you don't necessarily have an anaphylactic shock the first time. It may just be a little unusual, with extra swelling or itchiness. It can build up until one day, it's just one toke over the line and someone is taking a pocket knife to your windpipe to try and save your sorry ass.

Not sure if red virginias can do that, but I believe those who say they are impacted. Makes perfect sense to me, even if it is from the same plant as others they can tolerate. My experience is similar with plums and cherries.
 

BROBS

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Nov 13, 2019
11,603
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I'm pretty sure shanez is correct on this one. I've never had allergic reactions in all my life -to anything- Not even hay fever or anything seasonal... until I was stung by bees back to back in one week a few years ago. The second time, my hands swelled up like literal balloons.

Since then, I developed "oral allergy syndrome" to plums and cherries. It is basically just an itchy mouth. On rare occasions (because I still eat them), I have broken out in hives. Goes away after an hour or so, but it seems to be related to whether they are fresh off the tree or not. I can eat them dried, in jam, cooked, or older (most of the time) without issue.

A doctor prescribed me an epi pen, in case I one day kick over into a crazy reaction, which he said is possible at any time. Just be ready for the chance it can happen, was his advice.

So, unless I am unusual, I am a living example of how allergies can shift and change by degree over time. But, there is also medical literature to back this up. I got interested when it impacted me. Strange stuff, allergies.

Take away point: If you have an unusual reaction to something, I would be extra cautious the next go round. Way it was explained to me is that you don't necessarily have an anaphylactic shock the first time. It may just be a little unusual, with extra swelling or itchiness. It can build up until one day, it's just one toke over the line and someone is taking a pocket knife to your windpipe to try and save your sorry ass.

Not sure if red virginias can do that, but I believe those who say they are impacted. Makes perfect sense to me, even if it is from the same plant as others they can tolerate. My experience is similar with plums and cherries.
Does a low hanging or high hanging cherry make a difference?

no, it’s all cherries. And the allergy would be all tobacco. At least all VA tobacco.
 

unadoptedlamp

Preferred Member
Mar 19, 2014
637
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I'm just saying that the possibility exists that allergies may not work quite like you think they do. They are actually somewhat complicated.

But, who knows about Red VA? Maybe they are just a bunch of pussies!

I will just err on the side of believing the tales, as they very much resemble mine. So many variables. Location on the plant affecting the content of something that triggers the reaction, processing style, time cured, etc. It's endless.

So are the combinations with cherries and plums, in my case. Yes, picking a fruit directly off the tree is very different from picking one up off the ground that has been there for awhile. No idea why, exactly, but it is. Different still is whether they are cooked, dried, candied, etc.

It's complicated...
 
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BROBS

Preferred Member
Nov 13, 2019
11,603
39,262
IA
I'm just saying that the possibility exists that allergies may not work quite like you think they do. They are actually somewhat complicated.

But, who knows about Red VA? Maybe they are just a bunch of pussies!

I will just err on the side of believing the tales, as they very much resemble mine. So many variables. Location on the plant affecting the content of something that triggers the reaction, processing style, time cured, etc. It's endless.

So are the combinations with cherries and plums, in my case. Yes, picking a fruit directly off the tree is very different from picking one up off the ground that has been there for awhile. No idea why, exactly, but it is. Different still is whether they are cooked, dried, candied, etc.

It's complicated...
But then smoking a different tobacco made up of 100% red VA doesn’t bother? Just because there is no mention of red VA on the tin/description?! I’m more on the additive/casing train of thought.
 

shanez

Preferred Member
Jul 10, 2018
4,017
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47
Las Vegas
Theoretically, if that was the case in someone's red Virginia sensitivity, then it it could be tested for by smoking something like stoved or Cavendished red Virginias were most enzymes would be destroyed. If they still caused severe issues then it could narrowed down to a chemical irritant (assuming the person in question smokes perfectly and no problems are caused by technique).

The next question would be what specific chemical compounds are present in red Virginias but not other tobaccos?
Exactly. Now if we could just find someone willing to pay for all of the testing.

To exacerbate the issue quantity of a specific chemical could factor in as well, not just the specificity of the chemical.

I don't know enough about tobacco processing but I'd start by looking at ammonia in terms of a chemical irritant.
 

BROBS

Preferred Member
Nov 13, 2019
11,603
39,262
IA
Exactly. Now if we could just find someone willing to pay for all of the testing.

To exacerbate the issue quantity of a specific chemical could factor in as well, not just the specificity of the chemical.

I don't know enough about tobacco processing but I'd start by looking at ammonia in terms of a chemical irritant.
Is called tongue bite