A Sight To Bring Tears To The Eyes: 45,000 Barrels Of Bourbon Wasted!

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paulfg

Lifer
Feb 21, 2016
1,175
2,041
Corfu Greece
JAY loss of Jim Beam is not at disaster :D

this was https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Beer_Flood

I prefer beer to Scotch whisky dont Irish whiskey or bourbon at all,each to there own :puffpipe:

 

mso489

Lifer
Feb 21, 2013
37,711
45,917
I've settled on bourbon, but I rarely drink liquor. A bottle can last for years with me. Jim Beam would probably taste okay to me. But since I keep it as a mascot, my brand is fancier stuff.

 

mawnansmiff

Lifer
Oct 14, 2015
6,251
3,827
Sunny Cornwall, UK.
Here you go Duane....
GLENFIDDICH LAUNCHES FIRST NO-AGE STATEMENT COLLECTION
https://www.thedrinksbusiness.com/2013/09/glenfiddich-launches-first-no-age-statement-collection/
Regards,
Jay.

 

Chasing Embers

Captain of the Black Frigate
Nov 12, 2014
34,110
64,035
Okay, so it's limited to the Cask Collection. I thought you meant it applied to all of them. According to that article that line was launched in 2014. I've never seen any of them.

 

alaskanpiper

Lifer
May 23, 2019
7,816
24,199
Alaska
In addition to those they also make one that was aged in casks that used to hold IPA. (Likely english style IPA though, which is quite a bit weaker, and milder in flavor than its american counterparts, which for this use is probably a good thing). All the cask collection are decent offerings. If you are a glennfiddich fan you will enjoy them.
Jameson makes an irish IPA cask whiskey as well, the glenfiddich one is far better.

 

Chasing Embers

Captain of the Black Frigate
Nov 12, 2014
34,110
64,035
If you are a glennfiddich fan you will enjoy them.
I may give them a go. Usually, I pick up a bottle of 18 Year for my birthday. The 12 Year was for friends and family during the Independence Day festivities. I'm greedy. :mrgreen:

 

alaskanpiper

Lifer
May 23, 2019
7,816
24,199
Alaska
The 18 is a nice whiskey. Especially for the price. Have you branched out and tried any other scotches with a similar profile at all?

 

Chasing Embers

Captain of the Black Frigate
Nov 12, 2014
34,110
64,035
Though over the years Glenfiddich has become my mainstay, I do enjoy Macallan 12 Year, Glenlivet 15 Year, Johnnie Walker Gold Label Reserve, and Kilchoman Sauternes Cask Finish. I'll always be more of a rum guy though. :D

 

alaskanpiper

Lifer
May 23, 2019
7,816
24,199
Alaska
Kilchoman is an awesome new little distillery, really like the products they are putting out. If you like macallan 12 try Aberlour 16 if you feel like shaking it up (and if you haven't already). Better product less money IMO.
I like rum every now and then. We have a bottle of Kirk and Sweeney (23 I think?) right now that I'll hit up every now and then. I like it well enough, probably my favorite rum to drink straight, at least as of yet, but I have not tried that many. You will probably want to slap me for saying this, but I also like Pyrat quite a bit. I know it's probably far from the rum connoisseur's preference, but it's got a unique flavor that I enjoy on occasion. Most of the rum in our house is my wife's Koloa stash for mixers though. I can tolerate the Koloa dark straight when I have a sweet tooth.
Any rum recommendations?

 

jaytex1969

Lifer
Jun 6, 2017
8,277
38,445
Here
I drink a lot of rum and brandy/cognac lately.
I like trying many different ones and they need not be "top shelf" to enjoy a decent and unique flavor.
My wife has been on a Dark & Stormy kick lately. We like using Gosling's Black Seal rum for making those.
"A Dark 'n' Stormy is a highball cocktail made with dark rum and ginger beer served over ice and garnished with a slice of lime. Lime juice is also frequently added. This drink is very similar to the Moscow mule except that it has dark rum instead of vodka."
Ingredients: 3 1/3 oz Ginger Beer, Couple dashes of bitters, 2 oz Dark Rum

Preparation: In a highball glass filled with ice, add dark rum and top with ginger beer. Garnish with lime wedge.


 

mawnansmiff

Lifer
Oct 14, 2015
6,251
3,827
Sunny Cornwall, UK.
"Likely english style IPA though, which is quite a bit weaker, and milder in flavor than its american counterparts...."
I wouldn't say that Shepherd Neame's IPA is either weak in flavour nor alcohol content at 6.1% abv.
Bear in mind, India/Imperial Pale Ale was traditionally made as a strong ale to endure the lengthy journey form England to India etc.
https://www.shepherdneame.co.uk/beer/india-pale-ale
That said, I do enjoy what American IPA bottled ales that are available here. Shipyard springs to mind, a gorgeously smooth and very hoppy ale..yum yum! I buy it often.
"I like rum every now and then... "
Have you tried Wood's 100? At 57% abv it's a really smooth and toffee tasting Guianan rum aged in Scotland (of all places) for at least 7 years.
Regards,
Jay.

 

timelord

Part of the Furniture Now
Oct 30, 2017
804
1,610
Gallifrey
Apparently they make great whiskeys in Japan now. I have not been nerdy enough to check any of them out, as they are very expensive here, but there certainly is some innovation in the field.
Workman. They do; I tried a few when I was working in Tokyo a few years ago. But I see you like Laphroaig - so do I - but did you know that Laphroaig is owned by Suntory? So it is a 'Japanese Whiskey', only it's made in Islay by Scots :rofl:

 

alaskanpiper

Lifer
May 23, 2019
7,816
24,199
Alaska
I wouldn't say that Shepherd Neame's IPA is either weak in flavour nor alcohol content at 6.1% abv.
Yes, I'm sure there are exceptions to the rule, but generally speaking the overwhelming majority of American IPAs are both stronger (6-7% abv is the norm for a single IPA, with double/triple iterations as high as 12%) as well as waaaaaaay more hoppy than english IPAs, particularly the west coast variants.
Yes, well aware of IPAs origins. The boys in India needed their appropriately hopped ale despite it's long journey. Similar to the origin story for yet another great style of beer with origins in England, that of Russian Imperial Stout. Had to survive quite the carriage ride to remain suitable upon arrival in the east!
English IPA and American IPA are really two completely different styles of beer. English iterations typically use hop varieties such as Fuggles or English Kent Goldings, that are lower in Alpha acid (4-6%) whereas american west coast IPAs typically use hops like centennials, CTZ, Magnums, etc that can push 10-12% alpha acid. They are also loaded with these bittering hops in the early part of the boil resulting in a much more bold and bitter flavor than their english ancestors. Not to mention the obvious differences in base malt (typically america 2 row, vs marris otter or golden promise)
To anyone used to english style IPAs, west coast american IPAs are quite the slap in the face. IPAs from the US east coast (such as your shipyard example, depending on which of their many offerings you are referencing) are much milder, but still typically more aggressive than english style IPAs. Although, the east coast brewing world has changed quite a bit recently, and there are some pretty big IPAs coming out of EC breweries in recent years that rival some west coast iterations.
Have not tried to Wood's 100. I'll check and see if it is available here next time I hit the LC. Thanks for the recommendation!
 

Chasing Embers

Captain of the Black Frigate
Nov 12, 2014
34,110
64,035
If you can find a bottle of Oronoco, it is heavenly. Appleton Estate and Captain Morgan Black are my go tos, but Rumchata has it's moments.

 

mawnansmiff

Lifer
Oct 14, 2015
6,251
3,827
Sunny Cornwall, UK.
"English iterations typically use hop varieties such as Fuggles or English Kent Goldings, that are lower in Alpha acid (4-6%) whereas american west coast IPAs typically use hops like centennials, CTZ, Magnums, etc that can push 10-12% alpha acid"
I once had a gorgeous bottled American IPA (whose name escapes me right now) that claimed to have used no fewer than 22 different hop varieties 8O
If memory serves it was something like 7% abv and was to die for. I do like my hoppy ales!
I'll be trying Goose Island IPA (5.9%) next week for the first time.
Ever tried Guinness Foreign Extra stout? At 7.5% abv it's very smooth indeed.
Another to look out for is Robinson's Old Tom, brewed in Manchester it comes in at 8.5% abv and on the label it states that it ages in the same way as does wine. I can verify that as I've had it at 5 years old and it really was a treat!
Regards,
Jay.

 

alaskanpiper

Lifer
May 23, 2019
7,816
24,199
Alaska
I once had a gorgeous bottled American IPA (whose name escapes me right now) that claimed to have used no fewer than 22 different hop varieties 8O
Yeah, about 15 years ago the hophead train took off in the United States and since then it's become an absolutely insane hopfest in the American craft beer industry. Breweries creating hopping torpedoes over the kettles, "Randall's" to filter beer through, and beers that are 12%, 200 IBU monstrosities. All for the good though, some truly incredible offerings out there.
If memory serves it was something like 7% abv and was to die for. I do like my hoppy ales!
I'm not sure what kind of distribution from the states you get where you are located, but if you can find some IPA made by Sierra Nevada Brewing Company, their IPAs are pretty classic examples of American West Coast IPAs. Particularly Torpedo IPA (7.2%, 65 IBUs). Some others that may be findable are Green Flash West Coast IPA, Firestone Walker Union Jack IPA (funny, you'd think it'd be english, but its waaaay not), almost any IPA made by Stone Brewing Co., Russian River Blind Pig IPA, Ballast Point Sculpin IPA, Lagunitas IPA, or Bear Republic Racer 5 IPA.
I'll be trying Goose Island IPA (5.9%) next week for the first time
Goose island IPA is a good beer, but coincidentally (somewhat more rare among us breweries) is an homage to English style IPAs. However, also coincidentally, in speaking to strong stouts, Goose Island's Bourbon County Stout is one of the most famous (and a very delicious) examples of Imperial Stout made in the United States. It is aged in Bourbon Barrels, and clocks in at 15.2% abv. It is quite good, but a bottle to be shared for sure. Unfortunately, Goose Island is now owned by Anheuser-Busch (InBev) so we'll see what (if any) influence that has on their product. So far, at least in the offerings we get in Alaska, it seems fairly minimal.
Ever tried Guinness Foreign Extra stout? At 7.5% abv it's very smooth indeed
Yes, I have and it is a great beer! The best product Guinness makes, IMO. Unfortunately it is one of the few Guinness products that can be tougher to find in the US. In Alaska we seem to only get the flagship offerings, specialty brews, and the "regular" extra stout, which is nowhere near as good.
Some interesting reading for you.....gives a decent summary of the (major) various types of IPA in the world.......
https://www.craftbeering.com/english-ipa-vs-american-ipa/

 

alaskanpiper

Lifer
May 23, 2019
7,816
24,199
Alaska
Another to look out for is Robinson's Old Tom, brewed in Manchester it comes in at 8.5% abv and on the label it states that it ages in the same way as does wine. I can verify that as I've had it at 5 years old and it really was a treat!
In addition to the above post, I'll add that no, I have not had the Robinson's but I'll look it up and see if I can find it.
And yes, some styles of beer can age very gracefully for a few years (and in some cases more) in the cellar. Imperial Stouts and Barleywines (particularly english style barleywines) can really benefit from 2-5 years in the cellar. Belgian style sour beers (wild lambics) can age well for 20 years or more. Additionally, any beer brewed with brettanomyces usually ages quite well for a few years.
Some other larger styles of belgian beer (quadrupels mostly) can also age quite gracefully, with some people putting as much as 20 years on them (Chimay blue being the prime example and most widely consumed and/or cellared).
You do have to be somewhat careful with cellaring beer though. It is not that uncommon for beers that claim to "age like fine wine" to do exactly that, but only for a couple years. I personally wouldn't put more than 10 years on anything other than a sour lambic. Most Imperial Stouts/Barleywine's/Belgian Quads do well with 2-5 years IMO. After that they get fairly oxidized and start to take on a bready/cardboardy taste and thin out a little bit.
As a general rule (to which there are always some exceptions) I wouldn't age anything that is hop forward (IPAs/Double IPAs) or less than 8%abv, unless it is either a sour lambic/wild ale, or loaded with brettanomyces.

 

mawnansmiff

Lifer
Oct 14, 2015
6,251
3,827
Sunny Cornwall, UK.
Ha!!! Thank you Alaskanpiper, Lagunitas IPA is the gorgeous ale whose name escaped me.
For some reason it suddenly disappeared from the supermarket where I get my ales.
You mention Chimay Blue, wow, not had Chimay ales since sampling them in Belgium back in the 80's.
There was also an ale called Kriek (?) that was infused with raspberries, quite delightful it was.
That said, the only fruit infused ale I drink now is Elvis Juice brewed by Brewdog in Edinburgh. At 6.5% it's a beauty.
"Elvis Juice is loaded with a tart pithy grapefruit peel.

This IPA has a caramel malt base, supporting a full frontal citrus overload - grapefruit peel piled on top of intense US aroma hops.
"
Regards,
Jay.

 

alaskanpiper

Lifer
May 23, 2019
7,816
24,199
Alaska
No prob, figured it may be one of those, some of them are the most widely distributed.
Chimay is far and away the most widely distributed and consumed of the trappist ales. You should easily be able to find it in the UK. If you like it, try similar beers from Rochefort (10 or 8), Westmalle, Achel, la Trappe, and Koenigshaven. If you ever make it back to belgium, Westvleteren 12 (or any of their other beers) are a must try, but are only sold at the monastery. These are all trappist abbey ales similar to chimay. There are a lot of other great belgian quads out there that are not trappist made ales as well.
Kriek is still made and widely available, and it is actually infused with cherries. It is typically a very sour lambic made by many different belgian (and now american) brewers. Usually made with wild yeast and spontaneously fermented, then barrel aged with cherries. Some examples that may be easier examples to find today are Cantillon Kriek, Boon Oude Kriek and Marriage Parfait Kriek, Oud Beersel Oude Kriek, New Belgium Brewing Krieks (they make a few), 3 fonteinen kriek, Hanssen's Oude Kriek, or Lindeman's Cuvee Renee Kriek (NOT the usual Lindemans, which call themselves lambic, but are really much more like fruit beer [a style of its own that is not sour])
There are other sour lambics made with all types of fruit though (raspberries, blueberries, currants, peach, etc.) so the one you had may well have had raspberries, it just probably wouldn't carry the "kriek" on the label, which is typically on used when morello cherries are utilized. All of these sour lambics age beautifully, for decades, but sour beers are an acquired taste for many.
If the one you remember was not sour, and only "tart" it was likely Lindeman's "regular" Kriek, which is more like a sweet fruit beer and can be found everywhere along with their Cassis, Peach, Apple and other varieties. My wife loves them mixed 50/50 with champagne, hahaha.
We get many brewdog offerings here, but I have not seen Elvis Juice. I'll keep an eye out for it. I like many of their beers, others I am not a huge fan of. They are well known for making some of the most high abv beers on the planet though, some pushing 55% abv and some sold inside stuffed squirrels (not kidding). A crazy brewery.
If you are a beer fan, or interested in craft beer, i'd recommend checking out beeradvocate.com. You can find information on almost any beer on the planet, as well as reviews. They have forums similar to this one as well where one can get recommendations, discuss beers and their availability/merits. etc. It can be a rabbit hole like this forum, or just an easy resource for getting beer ratings and reviews.

 
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