1966 Dunhill LBS

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cigrmaster

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May 26, 2012
15,002
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I decided that I needed to smoke a Dunhill from the era that is supposed to be one of the best. With help from Jesse I decided to go after this one. It is supposed to be in excellent condition and the nomenclature is also crisp. It happened to be from a guy who knows George so I was confident in purchasing the pipe after speaking with him.
After I purchased it, I showed it to Al and he told me that it is a fairly rare edition because of the saddle stem. I love the classic looks of this pipe and am excited to see how it smokes.









 

thomasw

Preferred Member
Dec 5, 2016
864
6
Harris, I like the bowl thickness on that pipe! Some Dunhills don't have very thick bowls but yours is suited for sipping flakes! What's the length? TW

 

cigrmaster

Preferred Member
May 26, 2012
15,002
9,696
United States
Thom, I totally agree about the wall thickness. It is why I bought this particular pipe. I also see tons of Dunhills with very thin walls, that I know are going to be hot smokers. Here are the pipe stats.

* Length: 5 5/8”
* Height: 2”
* Chamber Diameter: 7/8”
* Chamber Depth: 1 3/4"
* Weight: 1.7 oz/48 g

 

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cigrmaster

Preferred Member
May 26, 2012
15,002
9,696
United States
derek, thanks. I am hoping it will be. If it is a great smoker, look out Dunhill collectors, you will have a little more competition.

 

sablebrush52

Preferred Member
Jun 15, 2013
10,825
4,653
look out Dunhill collectors, you will have a little more competition
Heh, heh! That will take some pressure off the Barling market. My evil plan has worked!

 

cigrmaster

Preferred Member
May 26, 2012
15,002
9,696
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Jesse, you should know better than that. I am a good multitask er and can buy both Dunhill and Pre Trans Barlings with either hand. Your Barlings are not safe.

 

doctorbob

Preferred Member
Mar 18, 2014
583
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I think you are better off with an LB over and LBS anyway. The LBS shape always strikes me as slightly clunky and unbalanced.
I dig the blast on your new acquisition!
Doc

 

cigrmaster

Preferred Member
May 26, 2012
15,002
9,696
United States
hagley, no I did not know it is an LB and not an LBS. I didn't know there is a difference. I just liked the shape so I bought it.
doctor, thanks.

 

chasingembers

Preferred Member
Nov 12, 2014
21,043
14,290
I've had three strikes from Dunhill. A straight Ruby Bark Billiard from '94 that wouldn't pass a pipe cleaner. A Shell Briar LB '74 that is now a bonsai container, and a Shell Briar '74 Zulu that's a glove box pipe. Wish you well with that one, but Dunhill has become less than a basket pipe from my experiences.

 

doctorbob

Preferred Member
Mar 18, 2014
583
2
doctor bob, me thinks you do not know the difference between an LB and LBS. The LB is the chunky billiard, and the LBS is a slimmer shank/bowl version of the LB.
I do know the difference :), to me the LB carries the chunky shape to an aesthetic conclusion, although Dunhill's tendency to apply a straight taper stem on occasion does somewhat ruin the effect. The LBS, in my opinion, looks like the shaper was going for a LB but lost his nerve.
Doc

 

doctorbob

Preferred Member
Mar 18, 2014
583
2
I've had three strikes from Dunhill. A straight Ruby Bark Billiard from '94 that wouldn't pass a pipe cleaner. A Shell Briar LB '74 that is now a bonsai container, and a Shell Briar '74 Zulu that's a glove box pipe. Wish you well with that one, but Dunhill has become less than a basket pipe from my experiences.
The above doesn't have much to do with Harris's new pipe, but to balance- I have a 1920, two '23's, a '33, a '44 and a '50 that are all outstanding pipes. The '50 LB shell and the '23 Bruyere 151, in particular, measure well against any pipe I have ever experienced, by any maker, from any era. Of course, these are earlier pipes, and times do change.
Doc

 

cigrmaster

Preferred Member
May 26, 2012
15,002
9,696
United States
Chasing, way to dump a cold bucket of water on my Dunhill. lol
I owned 2 2000 Bruyeres and one 70's shelll. I got rid of them all. I am hopeful that this era of alleged Dunhill brilliance will transfer to my 1966. If it doesn't I am going to chase Chasing down and make him smoke bowl after bowl of Mixture 79, so there.
Doc, thanks for sticking up for my 66, he appreciates it.

 

sablebrush52

Preferred Member
Jun 15, 2013
10,825
4,653
The above doesn't have much to do with Harris's new pipe, but to balance- I have a 1920, two '23's, a '33, a '44 and a '50 that are all outstanding pipes. The '50 LB shell and the '23 Bruyere 151, in particular, measure well against any pipe I have ever experienced, by any maker, from any era. Of course, these are earlier pipes, and times do change.
A lot of Dunhill collectors consider the period from 1958 thru 1968 to be a high water mark.
This is because Dunhill outsourced all of their remaining in-house manufacturing to Barling. :mrgreen:

 

doctorbob

Preferred Member
Mar 18, 2014
583
2
A lot of Dunhill collectors consider the period from 1958 thru 1968 to be a high water mark.
This is because Dunhill outsourced all of their remaining in-house manufacturing to Barling.
I have a '64 that I have not smoked yet, it is a funky 'scandinavian bulldog' that has a very narrow, tall chamber. I am not terribly impressed with the bit, either. I'll give it a go tonight though, and see how she deals with ERR. Most of my collecting has trended towards earlier, classic Britwood marques limiting my exposure to the later efforts of those companies.
Doc

 

thomasw

Preferred Member
Dec 5, 2016
864
6
So Harris ... have you put that LB through its paces yet? Cool, dry smokes or steamy, moist and hot smokes; what is the story? Another thing that I like about your pipe is the stem; first in that it is straight (I find unbent stems easier to clean and pass through the pipe-cleaners) and second in that it is saddle shaped, which I find slightly more comfortable to clench than a straight tapered stem. Let us know the deal... Or perhaps you don't have it in hand yet?

 

sablebrush52

Preferred Member
Jun 15, 2013
10,825
4,653
Jesse, Where did the wood come from back in that period? Is it the oil curing that made them so sought after?
My memory is turning to shit so all I can recall at the moment is that Dunhill came into some great briar that they used in that period, and they were still doing a lot of hand crafting. The briar used they would have bought on the market, like everyone else at that time. The countries they sourced from also changed as the Algerian briar that they ahd used for blasts, became unavailable. I can't remember where I put the info on sourcing, so I can't be more helpful. Sardinia, Calabria? Damn. They were sought after because they were good pipes that were very heavily promoted.

 
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