With Pipe and Pen  Blog » South Ferry Terminal

Archeologists in New York Uncover Tobacco Pipes Dating Back to the 17th Century

    March 18th, 2010

 

By Bob Tate

Fluted pipe with vertical milling around the rim and wheat sheaf between floral decorations on the side of the bowl Made in Chester, England c. 1810-1840 (Photo Courtesy of New York Transit Museum)

Fluted pipe with vertical milling around the rim and wheat sheaf between floral decorations on the side of the bowl Made in Chester, England c. 1810-1840 (Photo Courtesy of New York Transit Museum)

 

The New York Transit Museum’s Annex in Grand Central Terminal (mid-town Manhattan) is opening an exhibit featuring artifacts dating back to the 1600s. Included in the exhibit will be a collection of nineteen vintage pipes, many dating back to the 1600s.  The exhibit opens today (March 18, 2010) and will be presented along with other artifacts uncovered from the site where the South Street Ferry Terminal now stands.

English and Dutch manufactured smoking pipes dating back to the 1600s were among the artifacts uncovered during the archeological dig before the construction of the South Ferry Terminal began. Nineteen of these pipes will be featured in an upcoming exhibition at the New York Transit Museum’s Gallery Annex in Grand Central Terminal in mid-town Manhattan. The new exhibition entitled, “Where New York Began: Archeology at the South Ferry Terminal” runs March 18, 2010 – July 5, 2010.

The “New York Transit Museum Gallery Annex and Store” in Grand Central Terminal (mid-town Manhattan) is open 8 AM to 8 PM Monday through Friday and 10AM to 6PM on Saturday & Sunday.  Admission is free. The New York Transit Museum’s flagship is located in a decommissioned subway station at the corner of Boerum Place and Schermerhorn Street in Brooklyn Heights. The Museum has two locations, the flagship in Brooklyn which is 60,000 square feet and the Annex which is 2,000 square feet.
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