With Pipe and Pen  Blog » Packing a Tobacco Pipe

Tobacco Pipe Packing Methods - Part 2 (Videos)

    November 28th, 2009

 

By Bob Tate

packing

This is a companion piece to my article, Tobacco Pipe Packing Methods. I apologize that it took me so long to get this piece up, but here it is. It is the video tutorials on how to do the methods described in Part 1.

I am not going to repeat the written directions as you can read them in Tobacco Pipe Packing Methods – Part 1. I am just going to post the videos in this article so that you can see visual instructions that go along with the written instructions. I am going to post the videos in the same order as the methods are listed in Part 1.

So, here they are! Read the rest of this entry »

Flake Pipe Tobacco Preparation

    September 23rd, 2009

 

By Bob Tate

flakes

Flakes are one of the ways that pipe tobacco is made. Flake tobacco is made by pressing tobacco under extreme pressure for a period of time forming a cube. The cube is then sliced into strips called flakes. When you smoke flake tobacco it has to be packed differently than loose cut pipe tobacco. You can not simply fill the pipe and smoke it; you have to prepare the flakes first. There are many ways that flake tobaccos can be prepared. The way that you prepare a flake will have an effect in the taste of the tobacco and the way that the tobacco burns.

The larger you leave the pieces of flake, the stronger the flavor will be and the harder it will be to get the tobacco burning. Leaving the flakes whole or in large chunks will make the tobacco burn slow. This is a good technique to use when you are going to smoke outside as the wind will have less of an effect on the tobacco. Smaller pieces will make the flavor a little lighter and the tobacco will be easier to burn. It will also burn a little quicker as well. In this article I will describe a few of the different methods on how to prepare flakes for smoking. I have also included short videos of how to do each different method. Now onto the methods! Read the rest of this entry »