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Cornell & Diehl #107 Haunted Bookshop - Pipe Tobacco Reviews

    February 21st, 2011

 

By Bob Tate

Cornell & Diehl Haunted Bookshop Tin

The pouch aroma is a nice straight forward tobacco smell with a light hint of tanginess. The moisture content is perfect for smoking right away with no drying time needed. The cut of this blend is rough, coarse, and chunky. I loaded the pipe using the Three Step Method and proceeded to the charring light.

On the charring light:
Flavor: Is a straight forward tobacco flavor.
Aroma: Is a straight forward tobacco aroma with a hint of sweetness.
I finished lighting the pipe and settled in for the smoke.
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Artisan Pipe Maker Bob Hayes Interview

    October 8th, 2010

 

By Bob Tate

Artisan Pipe Maker Bob Hayes

Artisan Pipe Maker Bob Hayes

 

The 2010 Richmond Pipe Show, as always, had quite a few artisan pipe makers in attendance and one of them was Bob Hayes. Bob Hayes attends most of the pipes shows and he is also the son-in-law of Craig and Patty Tarler of Cornell & Diehl. His table is normally set up right next to the Cornell & Diehl tables, so when you are at a show, just look for the Cornell & Diehl tables and you will find Bob Hayes and his pipes. Bob has received the Triangle Area Pipe Smokers (TAPS) Professional Pipe Carver of the Year Award at the Raleigh Pipe Show for three consecutive years; 2008, 2009, and 2010.
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Cornell & Diehl After Hours - Pipe Tobacco Review

    August 3rd, 2010

 

By Bob Tate

after-hours-tin

[Note: This tobacco has been opened for over a year. I do not recall the original tin aroma. I am just describing what I smell now. It could also explain the lack of rum flavor and aroma for me in this review.]

The tin aroma of this blend is of a grassy/hay type smell with some tanginess and a slight sweetness. The moisture content is perfect for smoking right away with no drying time needed. I rubbed out a couple of the flakes and loaded my pipe and proceeded to the charring light.
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Cornell & Diehl #066 Star of the East - Pipe Tobacco Reviews

    July 18th, 2010

 

By Bob Tate

cd

The pouch aroma of this blend is a nice sweet and smoky aroma with a very light tang. The moisture content is on the dry side, but I prefer my tobacco that way and consider it perfect for smoking right away. The cut of this blend is large and chunky. Because the blend is so large and chunky, and it is on the dry side, I suggest some extra care and time when loading the bowl. This blend doesn’t pack as easily as a lot of other blends. I loaded my pipe and proceeded to the charring light.
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Cornell & Diehl Sunday Picnic - Pipe Tobacco Reviews

    July 1st, 2010

 

By Bob Tate

 

sunday-picnic-tin

The tin aroma of this blend is a nice sweet and tangy smell with a light hint of spice to it. It smells really nice. The moisture content is perfect for smoking right away with no drying time needed. This tobacco is in flake form. I took a couple of flakes, rubbed them out, loaded my pipe, and proceeded to the charring light.
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Cornell & Diehl #417P Night Train - Pipe Tobacco Reviews

    June 24th, 2010

 

By Bob Tate

cd

The tin aroma of this blend is a nice sweet and tangy tobacco smell. The tanginess hits my nose with some strength and starts my mouth to watering. The moisture of this tobacco was perfect for smoking right away with no drying time needed. This tobacco comes in a pressed cake form. I used a really sharp knife and cut off slices of the brick (Fig. 1) across the grain. Once the slices were cut, the tobacco basically crumbled apart and I only needed to lightly rub out some of the larger chunks (Fig. 2).
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Interview with Greg Pease of G.L. Pease Tobacco - Part 1

    April 15th, 2010

 

By Bob Tate

greg-pease-pic-01
Greg Pease is the owner of G.L. Pease, Intl. Greg began blending pipe tobacco over 30 years ago and in 1998 left his regular job of 18 years to pursue tobacco blending full time. In early 2000, G.L. Pease Tobacco was born. G.L. Pease tobaccos have become one of the better known premier pipe tobacco blends today. Greg makes it a habit of using only the best quality tobaccos that are available at any given time in his blends. G.L. Pease tobacco blends are made by hand and in small batches to maintain the integrity of his blends.

He also runs his own website [glpease.com] which is loaded with useful information about pipe tobacco and the G.L. Pease tobacco blends, all of which is written by Greg himself. You can see all of the G.L. Pease tobacco blends with their descriptions at glpease.com and cornellanddiehl.com.

I recently had the opportunity to ask Greg some questions. Here is our interview with Greg Pease of G.L. Pease Tobacco:

 

PM: When you first started blending pipe tobacco blends, was it more of a hobby or did you have plans to make it into a business?
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Interview With Master Blender Russ Ouellette - Part 2

    February 12th, 2010

 

By Bob Tate

russ-ouellette-01In part 1 of our interview with Russ Ouellette (Blendtobac), we talked about some of the things he has done before he got heavily involved in the tobacco industry. We also talked about how he got started blending pipe tobacco blends, how he maintains the consistency of his blends, some of the problems that he has acquiring certain tobacco components, and a few other things. Here, we pick up the interview where we left off in Part 1:

PipesMagazine (PM): What are some of the major changes that you have seen in the pipe industry over the years that you have been involved?

Russ: Certainly from the pipe end of things, some of the old brands are not quite what they used to be, but there are still a lot of wonderful pipes out there. I think one of the best things to happen is that we’re seeing more individual carvers around the world. There weren’t that many individual artisans in the US in the 70’s even though the market was pretty strong. It was mostly mass manufactured, even though a lot of those brands produced wonderful quality pipes. But now we’re seeing a lot more one-of-a-kind freehand pipes by very, very talented carvers.

In terms of tobaccos though, it’s radically in the other direction where the European cigarette companies have snapped up a lot of the Oriental tobaccos that used to be available for pipe blends and some of those tobaccos that I mentioned to you before just aren’t available. Mike McNeil [McClelland Tobacco] was able to acquire a number of different Orientals because he has a friend in the cigarette business. Unfortunately, I don’t have a contact like that; that would allow me that kind of access. And a lot of the old blends have disappeared; the current versions aren’t the same as what they used to be. The one thing that I think a lot of people don’t understand is the subtle complexities of the tobacco leaf, and they shouldn’t have to. Unless you’re dealing with it, you won’t recognize it unless you’re doing it all the time. One of the problems that I have seen in recent years is that a blend will become unavailable and I’ll get phone call after phone call, you know “Can you reproduce it?” Some people say that they can and they make an attempt, and sometimes they do a great job of it. Read the rest of this entry »

Cornell & Diehl Exhausted Rooster - Pipe Tobacco Reviews

    October 17th, 2009

 

By Bob Tate

exhausted-rooster-tin

The pouch aroma of this blend is that wonderful tanginess that tickles the nose slightly and makes my mouth water. It also has a slight amount of sweetness and just a touch of spiciness to the aroma. The moisture content is perfect for smoking right away.

This blend is a broken flake. For this review, I did not rub the pieces out. I left the pieces as they were, loaded my pipe, and proceeded to the charring light. On the charring light I am greeted with that lovely taste and aroma of the Virginias. The taste is a slightly tangy, slightly sweet, tobacco taste. I settled in for the smoke with expectations of a good, relaxing smoke from this blend. Read the rest of this entry »