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What makes a VA or Vap a VA

(9 posts)
  • Started 4 years ago by scrooge
  • Latest reply from 4nogginsmike
  1. scrooge

    scrooge

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    OK, don't laugh. this is a serious question for me! 1st off I know they have Virginias in it but, most baccys have some in it to a certain degree. So when someone says they like va's what exactly are they saying they like or want? If you can please try to explain this to me. Give a few samples of va tobacco by the way not really new to pipes, but I just don't get this. I always thaught my kids theres no such thing as a dumd question, I'm finally taking my own advise. thank you greatly if you can put this into words a simpleton "ME" can understand.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  2. jimbo44

    jimbo44

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    As you say, many blends have a foundation of Va. - English mixtures being a classic example.

    However, when folks refer to just a Va., they mean a blend of Virginia leaf used straight without mixing with other tobacco's; may be a single strain or may be a blend of leaves from different strains (red, yellow etc.) or locations. Va. does not all come from Virginia USA - in fact most now doesn't - but other states or other countries.

    There can be condimental additions, some stated, some not; the addition of Perique makes it a Va/Per. but sometimes trace elements of oriental tobacco can be added whilst still maintaining a pure Va. profile.

    Can be flake, broken flake, plug, twist, ready rubbed or ribbon cut but the essence is - stright Virginia tobacco rather than a mixture.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  3. scrooge

    scrooge

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    THANK YOU SO MUCH jimbo44 this has bothered me for so long not really knowing. truly thanks I've printed your response and its hanging next to my desk that's how serious I was thanks a million james/scrooge

    Posted 4 years ago #
  4. jimbo44

    jimbo44

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    You asked for examples - they are legion; just a few:

    GL Pease Union Square
    Samuel Gawith Best Brown Flake and Full Virginia Flake
    McClelland Christmas Cheer, BlackWoods Flake, Matured Virginia No.25 and No. 27 (and many more)
    Dunhill Flake
    Cornell & Diehl Opening Night

    Posted 4 years ago #
  5. cortezattic

    Cortez

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    Jimbo's answer is as correct and succinct as one could possibly hope for.
    You may benefit from browsing The Pipe Tobacco Aging, Storage and Cellaring FAQ

    I find myself sitting idly on the line dividing past and future,
    as if I could kill time without injuring eternity. -- Thoreau
    Posted 4 years ago #
  6. mso489

    mso489

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    That's a good clarification of what many of us thought we knew but had never heard/seen stated. Thanks.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  7. maxx

    maxx

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    I find English blends confusing. Some have Perique or Burley or Black Cavandish in some combination. I don't remember: do all have Virginia? The only clear constant seems to be Latakia (and Virginia?).

    "Curiosity is one of the most permanent and certain characteristics of a vigorous intellect."
    ~ Samuel Johnson ~
    Posted 4 years ago #
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    jitterbugdude

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    A "Virginia" tobacco is known in the non pipe smoking world as a "Flue Cured" tobacco. To be classified as a Virginia, the tobacco cultivar must have a high sucrosester content (sugar). Once the leaves are harvested they are subject to high heat. This kills the enzymes in the leaf that would normally consume the sugars. The sugars in the leaf as they are burned, lower the pH of the smoke. The lower pH results in a smoother smoke. It also reduces the nicotine that is absorb through the mouth and contribute to the tongue bite often associated with a Virginia.

    Orientals also have a fair amount of sugars in them, though not as much as a Virginia. The purpose of sun curing an Oriental serves the same purpose as flue curing. It sets the sugars in the leaf.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  9. 4nogginsmike

    4nogginsmike

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    I've heard 1792 referred to as a VA, and that Haddos and Cumberland are also a VAs. But Haddos has perique and Cumberland that and Dark-Fired. So to me calling tobacco a VA can mean straight VA, VAs with a condimental presence of some other tobacco or, like Haddos, that it is topped, or like Cumberland that is perhaps not more than 70% VA, a VA-driven tobacco. But getting back to 1792, some play fast and loose with their tobacco component attributions. Don't really know the tobacco is, call it a VA. Doesn't taste like burley, latakia, perique, dark-fired or oriental, call it a VA.

    Posted 4 years ago #

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