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What Did Mark Twain Put In His Pipe?

(30 posts)
  • Started 3 years ago by teamhavoc28
  • Latest reply from olewaylon
  1. User has not uploaded an avatar

    teamhavoc28

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    I've been trying to google it to death about mark twain's choice of pipe tobacco. His tastes for cigars and pipes are well known. My question is what type of tobacco did he regularly smoke in his pipe? Do any members here have any light to shed on his consumption.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  2. unclearthur

    unclearthur

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    Either the folks at the Mark Twain Museum or at Peterson may be able to help you out.

    If at first you don't succeed you are running about average.
    Posted 3 years ago #
  3. marmal4de

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    Definitely post what they have to say teamhavoc

    In a society that has destroyed all adventure, the only adventure left is to destroy that society.
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    Posted 3 years ago #
  4. ohin3

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    not sure what Mark Twain smoked but would be interesting to find out. Also always wanted to know what Bertrand Russell smoked.

    Posted 3 years ago #
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    teamhavoc28

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    Thanks arthur! I'll email them later tonight or in the morning. Just think it would be great to find a blend that he smoked ( or something similar).

    Posted 3 years ago #
  6. igloo

    igloo

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    Judging by accounts of his cigars I would say the cheapest thing he could find .

    “There was an awful suspicion in my mind that I'd finally gone over the hump, and the worst thing about it was that I didn't feel tragic at all, but only weary, and sort of comfortably detached.”
    Posted 3 years ago #
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    stacen

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    ditto on the bertrand russel Ohin3 !!!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  8. ichbinmuede

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    Something cheap and cube cut. From what I've read he kept his tobacco in a long and thing sack, took the stem off his cob and tossed it in the bag and shook it. When he wanted to smoke he just took his cob out and put the stem back in.

    I'd definitely like to know something similar to what he smoked.

    Also, like it has been said already...

    ditto on the bertrand russel Ohin3 !!!

    "Enjoy every sandwich." -Warren Zevon
    Best advice that I've ever heard.
    Posted 3 years ago #
  9. expatpipe

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    Taken from here

    In 1890, famed British poet and writer, Rudyard Kipling, visited Missouri's Mark Twain at his Elmira, N.Y. summer domicile. Kipling complemented the Hannibal native on his epicurean tastes and continental style, but chided Twain for putting fine, Turkish tobacco into a lowly American corncob pipe. "Ah, yes," Twain replied, eyes twinkling, "I see your point. But the tobacco will not go to waste." Samuel Langhorn Clemens paused for effect, "this, sir, is not a corncob pipe. It is a 'Missouri Meerschaum.' " Twain made his statement to Kipling neither as a jest nor a retort. Simply a fact.

    There is a light that never goes out.
    Posted 3 years ago #
  10. pipevilleworld

    pipevilleworld

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    I also understand that Mark Twain would smoke close to 40 cigars a day; any of you folks smoke THAT often?

    Posted 3 years ago #
  11. cortezattic

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    Mark Twain quotations on tobacco has a pic with a printed testimonial that you may be able to read if you enlarge the image.

    I find myself sitting idly on the line dividing past and future,
    as if I could kill time without injuring eternity. -- Thoreau
    .
    Posted 3 years ago #
  12. pipevilleworld

    pipevilleworld

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    ... wonderful link, cortezattic. Twain is one my favorite authors too.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  13. igloo

    igloo

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    Cortez Iam glad you and Twain were friends and you remembered .

    Posted 3 years ago #
  14. pstlpkr

    Lawrence

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    "Ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put." Winston Churchill
    View Lawrence  Whitcomb's profile on LinkedIn
    Posted 3 years ago #
  15. menckenite

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    I also understand that Mark Twain would smoke close to 40 cigars a day; any of you folks smoke THAT often?
    I really doubt that. Let's assume he only slept for four hours a day. That's 20 hours a day to smoke 40 cigars. Can anyone here smoke 2 cigars in one hour?

    Pics of my pipes & stuff: http://photobucket.com/menckenite
    Posted 3 years ago #
  16. pipevilleworld

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    Yeah... I'm pretty sure he was exaggerating... it was part of a piece he wrote in a letter after he began to get sickly.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  17. pipevilleworld

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    I'm reading that it was closer to, and still rumored, 22 cigars a day so... started at the age of 8 or 9 too!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  18. jasongone

    jasongone

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    i always agreed with the Twain statement to never refrain from smoking when awake and to never smoke while sleeping. i am somewhat of a heavy smoke eater, and am pretty much always smoking something unless i am somewhere where i am told i can not smoke. but even that doesn't stop me quite often.
    i think the actual number of cigars would depend greatly on the size of the cigar.

    Posted 3 years ago #
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    htmn246

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    If any one is near Virgina City Nevada check at the Mark Twain museum there it is in his old newspaper office.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  20. shimrra

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    lol i have been to his house, its in ct

    Posted 3 years ago #
  21. lordofthepiperings

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    I've always been curious as to what the actors who've played Holmes were smoking. Mostly I've wondered what Jeremy Brett preferred to have in those churchwardens he was always puffing on, but it'd be interesting to know what Rathbone was smoking as well. Also I was kinda curiuos as to what Cedric the Entertainer was smoking in his Peterson for that new movie he did with Tom Hanks. Wondering if he kept it Peterson and had some Luxury Blend or Connoisseur's Choice in it or what.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  22. samcoffeeman

    samcoffeeman

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    I just was wondering about this topic and this thread came up. I found a very interesting article about a so-called interview with Mr. Twain himself here.

    Here is an interesting part:

    MR. HATTON appears to be in doubt whether Mark Twain smokes three hundred cigars a year-or a month. There is a slight difference both to tobacconist and consumer. I have been told that his annual, allowance is three thousand cigars. But it must not be thought that his devotion to tobacco stops at this trivial quantity. The cigars merely represent his dessert in the way of smoking. The solid repast of nicotine is taken by means of a corn-cob pipe. The bowl of this pipe is made from the hollowed-out cob of an ear of Indian corn. It is a very light pipe, and it colours brown as you use it, and ultimately black, so they call it in America "The Missouri Meerschaum." I was much impressed by the ingenuity with which Mark Twain fills his corn-cob pipe. The humorist is an inspired Idler. He is a lazy man, and likes to do things with the least trouble to himself. He smokes a granulated tobacco which he keeps in a long check bag made of silk and rubber. When he has finished smoking, he knocks the residue from the bowl of the pipe, takes out the stem, places it in his vest pocket, like a pencil or a stylographic pen, and throws the bowl into the bag containing the granulated tobacco. When he wishes to smoke again (this is usually five minutes later) he fishes out the bowl, which is now filled with tobacco, inserts the stern, and strikes a light. Noticing that his pipe was very-aged and black, and knowing that he was about to enter a country where corn-cob pipes are not, I asked him if he had brought a supply of pipes with him.

    "Oh, no," he answered, "I never smoke a new corn-cob pipe. A new pipe irritates the throat. No corn-cob pipe is fit for anything until it has been used at least a fortnight."

    "How do you manage then?" I asked. "Do you follow the example of the man with the tight boots;--wear them a couple of weeks before they can be put on?"

    "No," said Mark Twain, "I always hire a cheap man--a man who doesn't amount to much, anyhow--who would be as well--or better--dead, and let him break in the pipe for me. I get him to smoke the pipe for a couple of weeks, then put in a new stem, and continue operations as long as the pipe holds together.

    We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal,
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    that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness
    Posted 1 year ago #
  23. dervis

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    What a good little read. Thanks!

    "You have to be a man first before you're a gentleman. "

    John Wayne
    Posted 1 year ago #
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    bogglor

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    Mark Twain hiring bums to break pipes in for him, that's the greatest thing I've heard in a while.

    Posted 1 year ago #
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    Anonymous

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    Hey, I do the same thing now -- all but one of the pipes I've bought over the last couple years have been restored estates, so in essence, the previous owner paid ME a considerable amount of money to smoke and break-in that pipe for me LOL.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  26. foggymountain

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    He probably smoked weed. (That sense of humor.) as far as 40 cigars a day, I believe it less than the frog who leaped into the next county. And he would have had to be able to smoke while asleep.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  27. sparroa

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    I know everyone was asking this a year ago, but Bertrand Russell predominately smoked Fribourg & Treyer Golden Mixture. (I don't have any sources to cite, but I read it in the past few months)

    Posted 1 year ago #
  28. misterlowercase

    misterlowercase

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    Pipes & Tobaccos magazine featured a great write-up of Twain in their Fall 1997 issue, there's a picture of several receipts circa 1880 from Salomon & DeLeeuw where along with buying a dozen or two corncobs, he'd buy Blackwell's Durham by the pound.

    It seems Blackwell's Durham is the most likely candidate, but I don't think he limited himself either.

    A couple of quotes:
    "No good smoking tobacco in Europe - no Durham, Vanity F, Lone Jack - but I brought mine with me..."

    "Gave away all my Durham & kept the worst brand in America - still it was of course better than any in Europe - Latakie is almost as good."

    ...and the thing about his filling technique is from an interview by Luke Sharp who sez
    "I was much impressed by the ingenuity with which Mark Twain fills his corn-cob pipe. The humorist is an inspired Idler. He is a lazy man, and likes to do things with the least trouble to himself. He smokes a granulated tobacco which he keeps in a long check bag made of silk and rubber. When he has finished smoking, he knocks the residue from the bowl of the pipe, takes out the stem, places it in his vest pocket, like a pencil or a stylographic pen, and throws the bowl into the bag containing the granulated tobacco. When he wishes to smoke again (this is usually five minutes later) he fishes out the bowl, which is now filled with tobacco, inserts the stern, and strikes a light."

    another good thread on a similar topic here:
    http://pipesmagazine.com/forums/topic/famous-pipe-men-and-their-tobacco

    Posted 1 year ago #
  29. flintlockjohn

    flintlockjohn

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    Somebody here should try Twain's method of loading his pipe. I would, but I am fresh out of bags made of silk and rubber.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  30. olewaylon

    olewaylon

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    Haha, that is great. Imagine having "a man who doesnt amount to much" breaking in your pipes!

    Posted 1 year ago #

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