banner

Pipes Magazine » Pipe Talk » Make Your Own Pipe Project

Search Forums  
   
Tags:   

Waxing Without Machinery

(29 posts)
  • Started 5 months ago by daniel7
  • Latest reply from orlandofurioso
  1. daniel7

    daniel7

    Senior Member
    Joined: Sep 2018
    Posts: 313

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I'm just before my first DIY pipe-project, which will be a briar eskimo-shape pipe. Everything is in my head already, finally I found the correct piece of briar and stem, I know the colour I would like to use for staining, so hopefully everything will go in order. I have only one question; Can I apply carnauba wax also by hand? I would like to work 100% by hand (except drilling/chamber), so I will use saw, sandpaper, files. The only thing what I can't see is the application method of the wax. Carnauba is a very hard material and I'm not sure if it is possible to reach the same, nice-looking finish as with machine. Are there any special technique or material (sponge, clothes) what I should use?

    Posted 5 months ago #
  2. chasingembers

    chasingembers

    Captain Of The Black Frigate
    Joined: Nov 2014
    Posts: 15,578

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I've never managed to use carnauba without a buffer. Paragon wax may be the way to go by hand.

    I like coffee exceedingly.
    - H. P. Lovecraft
    Posted 5 months ago #
  3. User has not uploaded an avatar

    chilly65

    Junior Member
    Joined: Nov 2018
    Posts: 72

    offline

    Login to Send PM

  4. daniel7

    daniel7

    Senior Member
    Joined: Sep 2018
    Posts: 313

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Thank you, but what do you think, is Paragon hard enough? Won't it be matte too fast? Or will it protect the pipe enough?

    This renaissance looks also promising.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  5. chasingembers

    chasingembers

    Captain Of The Black Frigate
    Joined: Nov 2014
    Posts: 15,578

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Protect the pipe from what?

    Posted 5 months ago #
  6. chasingembers

    chasingembers

    Captain Of The Black Frigate
    Joined: Nov 2014
    Posts: 15,578

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Halcyon and Paragon are updated versions of Renaissance if you were wondering.

    http://pipesmagazine.com/forums/topic/renaissance-waxuk-vsparagon-wax-polish#post-1094175

    Posted 5 months ago #
  7. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 18,205

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Renaisance wax doesn't make them glossy at all. It was a microcrystaline wax designed by British museums to coat any object, wood, paper, cloth, metals, etc... any material that you will find in a museum. It protects the object from oxidizing, without interfering with the natural finish of the object. I use it on my stems... but only because I have a bucket of the stuff that I use in my jewelry designs.

    But, I think it's essential that you note the melting point of these waxes. A microcrystaline (if in fact this is what Paragon is) will melt at body temperature. If the wax melts in your fingers, it's pretty pointless to use it, IMO. The reason (I believe) that carnuba is used is durability and it has such a high melting point.

    Check on the pipemaking forum. Most of these artisan pipes are coated with a formula of carnuba and shellac. Or, something along these lines. Plus, they would know what the hell they are talking about.

    Michael
    Posted 5 months ago #
  8. daveinlax

    daveinlax

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 1,099

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I also use Renaissance Wax.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  9. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 18,205

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I also use it... on my hammers, my anvils, any surface that will rust in my studio. Knife makers are big into using it on their work, and it does a fairly good job of reducing tarnish on jewelry. It is fantastic at protecting stems. In almost a decade of using it, I have never had a stem oxidize. All I do is wipe my stems down well with a jeweler's polish cloth after each smoke to keep the luster up, and once a year, put a tiny dab of Renaissance wax in my fingers, wipe on the stem, and then wipe it off. voila!!! Some guys act like taking care of their pipes is work or something.

    Seriously, ask check out the pipemaker's forum. We are basically just a bunch of consumers... but consumers with a great sense of humor. That other forums has guys who actually know answers to stuff like this.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  10. daveinlax

    daveinlax

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 1,099

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    It works great and that's why IMO Sam mixes in a little paraffin and sells it as Paragon and cuts it with a little mineral oil and sells it as Halcyon.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  11. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 18,205

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Daveinlax, it works great on a freshly carved pipe? Or, as upkeep on an already finished pipe? The OP is specifically looking to put a protective layer on a freshly carved pipe.

    Adding mineral oil and parafin makes it something completely different than a microcrystaline wax anyways.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  12. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

    The Bard Of Barlings
    Joined: Jun 2013
    Posts: 9,761

    online

    Login to Send PM

    I use both Paragon and Halcyon waxes, which are later formulations of microcrystalline waxes, based on Renaissance. I've used them for years with great results, but they are not as durable as a buffed carnuba. On the other hand, given how badly people use buffers, they are a less destructive way to go if you're looking for a gloss finish.

    If you know how to use them, they will deliver a brilliant gloss shine, similar to a carnuba finish and they brighten right up if they get a little dull from use, which is also true of carnuba. The big difference is that they are a suspension of particles and will not hold up to getting wet. But the surface is easy to renew, so that hasn't been a concern for me.

    Oh, and neither of them melts in my hands when I apply them, nor do they get dull. Quite the opposite, 'cause that's exactly how I apply them, but using my hands to polish the bowls to a high gloss and boy does that work better than using a cloth.

    It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt. - Mark Twain

    It is pointless to argue with a fanatic since a dim bulb can't be converted into a searchlight. - Jesse Silver
    Posted 5 months ago #
  13. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 18,205

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    OK then, but keep in mind that microcrystaline wax was never meant to give gloss, so it doesn't make any sense to start with Renaissance as a base to adding mineral oil and other waxes to it. Why even bother with the microcrystaline base, which was designed to be invisible on the surface of something, if you were going to add things to it to make it visible. Just use oils and other waxes.

    Museums needed a way to slow down oxidation of papers and leathers and woods to prevent them from getting older looking, but did not want the wax to be visible at all. Who wants to see greasy paper when they look at historical documents?

    Why not just sell these as "something new"? instead of trying to say it is like Renaissance wax? Maybe marketing it to people who have no clue what Renaissance wax is or is for?

    Posted 5 months ago #
  14. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

    The Bard Of Barlings
    Joined: Jun 2013
    Posts: 9,761

    online

    Login to Send PM

    Cosmic, the stuff glosses up wonderfully and keeps that gloss. If it works, it works. I don't know what or if Sam does what with what, nor do I care. It's a product that does what I need it to do, and that all that I need to care about.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  15. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 18,205

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Funny, how this thread came to this, but righto. I never made a comment about the halcyon paragon stuff. But, someone responded to my post about Renaissance, and... whirl and whirl, I totally agree with what you said Sable, and never disagreed. In fact, I used to keep an eye out for some of those polishes, but they were always out of stock back when I needed one. But, now that I have my routine down, I don't need any new products. But, if someone needed them to maintain their pipes, I would recommend them check those out.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  16. didimauw

    didimauw

    Mod
    Joined: Jul 2013
    Posts: 3,038

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Nose oil!!! I got plenty. I should sell it...

    "I don't know half of you half as well as I should like, and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve."
    Posted 5 months ago #
  17. woodsroad

    woodsroad

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 8,497

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I wax poetic sometimes. That doesn't require and machinery.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  18. mso489

    mso489

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 26,274

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I don't want a new-pipe look, and waxes and polishes can cause residue build-up. Plus, vigorous buffing with a cloth, slightly abrasive and then soft, like a jewelers cloth, over time gives a good shine and an admirable patina. If I had a buffer, I'd use it. I like ol' cajun's shoe shine buffer as a multi-use machine. Polishing by hand has its limitations but it's advantages.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  19. User has not uploaded an avatar

    mau1

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jan 2018
    Posts: 515

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Excellent thread.

    “I've been treating you with courtesy and respect because that's the way I choose to treat everyone. But never, ever mistake kindness with weakness.”
    ― Louise Penny, Still Life
    Posted 5 months ago #
  20. daniel7

    daniel7

    Senior Member
    Joined: Sep 2018
    Posts: 313

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Thank you for all of you! I will try Paragon and/or Halcyon. Which one gives the shinier look? I would like to have a shiny result at the end. Something like this: http://www.eldritchpipes.com/project/curiosities-sandblasted-author-2-2-2-2-2/

    Posted 5 months ago #
  21. donjgiles

    donjgiles

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Apr 2018
    Posts: 846

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Halcyon for smooth, rusticated or sandblasted pipes
    Paragon for smooth pipes only

    Don

    Posted 5 months ago #
  22. chasingembers

    chasingembers

    Captain Of The Black Frigate
    Joined: Nov 2014
    Posts: 15,578

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    If you let Paragon dry on a towel and then hand buff with it, you can use it on smooth, rustic, and blasts with no residue in the crevices.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  23. mso489

    mso489

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 26,274

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Embers, excellent tip.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  24. orlandofurioso

    orlandofurioso

    Member
    Joined: Dec 2013
    Posts: 232

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    With all due respect; I'm not of the carnauba crowd. To each his own.
    First a drop of recorder oil, then Renaissance Wax . if memory serves me correctly the melting point is HIGHER than Paragon/
    Halcyon . Or an extra drop of the good old recorder oil and no wax at all . The carnauba wax in tiny jars from Walker Briar Works works fine too, nice silk gloss.
    Their deoxidizer sucks .
    Quite new and amazing : Mark Hoover's mysterious before & After restoration balm, does it all . Cleans the briar and gives it a perfect sophisticated lustre. Evens out and enlivens faded stain.
    Horse hair and some elbow grease bring briar ( any wood ) to a wonderful, natural looking gloss.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  25. daniel7

    daniel7

    Senior Member
    Joined: Sep 2018
    Posts: 313

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    What do you think about Decatur Pipe Shield No-Buff Wax? Is it good only for pipe renewal or also for first-time waxing?
    This is it: https://www.cupojoes.com/decatur-pipe-shield-no-buff-wax-2-oz/

    Posted 4 months ago #
  26. ssjones

    ssjones

    Mod
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 14,570

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Interesting, the Decatur product is probably the same as Halycon/Paragon/Rennaisance, but less expensive.

    Al

    Posted 4 months ago #
  27. daniel7

    daniel7

    Senior Member
    Joined: Sep 2018
    Posts: 313

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Interesting, the Decatur product is probably the same as Halycon/Paragon/Rennaisance, but less expensive.

    Al

    Which means that it is worth a try or it is not worth a try?

    Posted 4 months ago #
  28. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2015
    Posts: 13,518

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Yes, do try it. And write a report!

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    Posted 4 months ago #
  29. orlandofurioso

    orlandofurioso

    Member
    Joined: Dec 2013
    Posts: 232

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    It is a waxed microfiber cloth, is it not ?

    Posted 4 months ago #

Reply

You must log in to post.

 

 

    Back To Top  | Back to Forum Home Page

   Members Online Now
   sablebrush52