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The Ugly Truth

(82 posts)
  • Started 1 year ago by popeofpiping
  • Latest reply from davek
  1. popeofpiping

    popeofpiping

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    So like many of you I have spent a few years aquiring different pipes, from estates to artisans I have built up a modest little collection. With pipes ranging into the hundreds of dollars I have come to the sad fact that, one of my $14 dollar cobbs is by far one of the best smokers in the group. If it wasn’t for the love of the hobby and collecting I’m not sure I’d ever need anything else than a good flake and a cob.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  2. philobeddoe

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    Looks like you are going to save a lot of money, if you enjoy the smoke, that’s all that matters!

    "So it goes." - K.V.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  3. mso489

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    For shear smoking pleasure, quality cobs (MM and Old Dominion) are all you need. Briars and Meerschaum have added pleasure for finish, feel, and patina, but they aren't going to excel cobs in quality smoking. It's almost a philosophical point in there somewhere.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  4. saltedplug

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    Out of the wilderness of confusion and opinion a single, small voice again points to a simple truth: pipes smoke far more the same than the do differently.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  5. warren

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    Why would that be a sad fact? Consider yourself lucky.

    A man without a shillelagh is a man without an expedient.
    Posted 1 year ago #
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    64alex

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    [With pipes ranging into the hundreds of dollars I have come to the sad fact that, one of my $14 dollar cobbs is by far one of the best smokers in the group.]

    To the cobbs I would add the clay pipes, which I consider in absolute the best as they don't alter tobacco flavor in any way, which are also very cheap ranging from around 10 $ for the old tavern style to 50-60 $ for the double walled models like the Lepeltier.
    But this is not a sad true, there are people who looks at pipes just as a smoking machine and others looks at them also for their aesthetics, neither one is right or wrong.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  7. popeofpiping

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    Your all are correct. It is not a sad fact but a welcoming fact that the pipe snob in me died a little more.

    Posted 1 year ago #
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    derekflint

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    Never tried a cob......

    Posted 1 year ago #
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    aldecaker

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    "Briars and Meerschaum have added pleasure for finish, feel, and patina, but they aren't going to excel cobs in quality smoking."

    This is exactly how I feel. I love my briars for many reasons, but not because they smoke better than cobs.

    A man who serves his country is a patriot. A man who serves his government is an employee. The two are not always the same thing.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  10. perdurabo

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    I love my cobs, never fail. I think I've come to the conclusion that I do not like Virginia's in a Meer. Their ok in a cob, but are better in a briar. I love Englishes in a cob, but I've heard of tons of folks that can't stand them in a cob. Aromatics are better in a cob, but some are better ina briar. Go figure.

    It's not my position nor want to help another man. It's his responsibility to help himself, as where he can learn to dig down deep enough to save himself. -I. Kidd
    Posted 1 year ago #
  11. chasingembers

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    I have come to the sad fact that, one of my $14 dollar cobbs is by far one of the best smokers in the group.

    Mine range from a couple of dollars up to $750. My PAD is mostly behind me, and cobs are hands down the best smoking pipes in the group. I've also discovered that my focus shape, the "yachtsman" can very often be had for under $30. No more pipes more than that for me since I found that cost does not equate a better smoke.

    Damnation seize my soul if I give you quarters, or take any from you.
    -Edward Teach
    Posted 1 year ago #
  12. luigi

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    Good to hear you like cobs and admit the money doesn't make a smoke any better.
    I prefer briars because they last longer and don't smell as much as cobs after smoking. Not being a collector I don't worry about costs, got 7 decent briars (from 70 to 200 $) which hurt my budget pretty badly but that should be it for many years, hopefully decades.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  13. chasingembers

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    Cobs can actually last for decades.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  14. mikethompson

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    Yup, cheap doesn't always mean disposable

    Posted 1 year ago #
  15. upnorth1

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    I outsmoke the briars with the cobs. I keep a "traveller"pouch at the ready for quick excursions and it contains a cob. If I reach for the rack without too much thought I usually pick out a cob.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  16. 5star

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    When I want to smoke with little fuss & the likelihood of good results I’ll often grab a cob. I don’t prefer them for every blend, but they do a good job for most of them.

    - Mac

    "You are remembered for the rules you break." - General Douglas MacArthur
    Posted 1 year ago #
  17. indianafrank

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    I own 8 cobs and 3 briars. Love my cobs.

    I don't know where I'm going...but sooner or later I'll get there.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  18. btwes7

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    I've actually never "worn out" a cob, and also have a modest collection of Briars (Petes, Ferndowns, Caminettos, etc). Smoke a cob probably 10 to one over Briars. Would like to get and try a good clay someday.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  19. jpmcwjr

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    I own a few cobs, one of which hasn't been smoked. It's ready to gift to a friend who wants to start. I smoke my briars 100:1 vs. cobs.

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  20. cosmicfolklore

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    I don't think anyone has ever told me to my face that the more expensive pipes smoke any better than the cheaper pipes. Corncobs vary for me though. Being a corn farmer, I just associate some of the aromas from the cob as... unpleasant to my tastes. However, a corncob and a pack of Carter Hall, and I can get anything that needs to be done outside done with a smile.

    Michael
    Posted 1 year ago #
  21. saltedplug

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    But this is not a sad true, there are people who looks at pipes just as a smoking machine and others looks at them also for their aesthetics, neither one is right or wrong.

    What bothers me in this debate are the implications that either the objective characteristics of the pipe make it a better pipe or that they subsume the actual characteristics of the delivery of smoke to the mouth from a briar bowl containing the burn through a hole at chamber bottom; through a draft drilled straight from the draft hole through shank and stem to the button. No, the quality of the smoke is separate from and actually subsumes the art employed in crafting the pipe. Yes, I enjoy and regularly admire the art in my pipes, but I make time to smoke; not to admire pipe art but to smoke. Smoking is the primary activity and pipe art second.

    We hear the words "a good smoker" ad nauseam, but no one says what they mean by this, and too often it is the familiar accolade for someone who is justifiably proud of the pipe he bought. My point is that neither side can substantiate their claim as smoking is very subjective. You cannot tell me why a pipe is "better" any more than I can tell you why those same characteristics do not constitute "better" for me.

    Yet every day threads start and posts are made by new and experienced members making the same unsupportable statements. Even members who agree with this post one day will the next day make such claims once more.

    YMMV. This is only my opinion. I don't control what members post. But in this matter I would love for them to tell me substantively the reasons why they make that their assertions.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  22. cosmicfolklore

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    I would love for them to tell me substantively the reasons why they make that their assertions.

    I think some have told us why and what makes their pipe better ad naseum over the years. I've been saying since I got here that I think it's the smoker more than the pipe. Some will site the bit, and the shape seems to transform the smoke as it hits their tongue into pure magic. Some will site that they can lay their pipe down and come back hours latter and it will still be burning cool. Some will argue that the hole drilled for the draft has to be engineered in some fashion for a pipe to even work, ha ha. Some will say the taste of the briar, and I can sort of see that, having gotten hold of one pipe that tasted bitter or green to me. Nothing can be proved to you or anyone else, but talking about pipes is what we do here. Even at The Briary smoking lounge, guys do the same thing, set around speculating over what makes their (insert pipe brand or maker here) smokes better than anything else they've ever smoked.

    Meanwhile, someone slaps a hole in a corncob, shoves a half-assed piece of wood, and adds a piss poor stem on it, and it smokes better than a Dunhill.

    It's like arguing what type of music is the best, or which softdrink is the best, or whatever... sure, it's subjective, but it's what we do. We smoke and think and talk (or write). It wont ever stop. We came to this knowing that it involves a device, and after a while, we delve into the magic of the device. It's fairly natural, and it's going to happen.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  23. cigrmaster

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    Cos, there isn't much of an argument about how bad internals can ruin a pipe. If it is drilled wrong, the pipe will smoke wet. If a stem is made poorly, it will also make a pipe smoke poorly. When it comes to acrylic vs. vulcanite, many people such as myself find acrylic very uncomfortable. I wish I could deal with acrylic as I would own a dozen or more Castello's instead of my lone one.

    People should be respectful of each others likes and dislikes. Saying that a cob smokes better than a Dunhill is your opinion and that is fine, but it is certainly not a fact. I am not a fan of Dunhil per se, but the ones I owned smoked a lot better than the cob I tried. For my smoking tastes, cobs do nothing to enhance the flavor of the flakes I smoke. I even tried the illustrious Carter Hall in my cob and was not impressed. The stem on the cob I owned was lousy and it took away part of the pleasure I get from smoking a pipe. My preference for a really nice hand cut vulcanite stem that is comfortable and engineered to produce a quality(for me) smoke is something I really enjoy. Pipes that have an open airway is an important criteria in the pipes I buy. I have owned pipes in the past that had airway's not large enough and stems that were restrictive and those pipes smoked poorly.

    Your dismissive attitude to those of us who enjoy their artisan pipes or our Pre Transition Barlings or whatever higher end pipes we collect is not cool. The world doesn't begin and end with a cob.

    Harris
    Posted 1 year ago #
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    aldecaker

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    "Yes, I enjoy and regularly admire the art in my pipes, but I make time to smoke; not to admire pipe art but to smoke. Smoking is the primary activity and pipe art second."

    The hand feel is part of the smoking experience for me, as is the feel of the bit and the way the pipe hangs (or doesn't). These are generally areas where my favored briars beat out my cobs. Where the cobs excel, for me, is that they are not prone to smoking hot, they don't get as wet, and the wide-open draft just breathes better and stays lit longer.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  25. chasingembers

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    Saying that a cob smokes better than a Dunhill is your opinion and that is fine, but it is certainly not a fact. I am not a fan of Dunhil per se, but the ones I owned smoked a lot better than the cob I tried.

    I have two '74s. A group four billiard, and a group three Zulu. The billiard has since become a container for a tiny bonsai, and the group three is a glove box pipe. Cobs beat them.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  26. cosmicfolklore

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    Your dismissive attitude to those of us who enjoy their artisan pipes or our Pre Transition Barlings or whatever higher end pipes we collect is not cool. The world doesn't begin and end with a cob.

    Was that meant to be wafted in my general dirrection? If so, you’ve forgotten about 90% of what I’ve ever posted concerning pipes, ha ha. Plus, I was defending people like you (us) who do appreciate a well made briar and appreciate discussing them. Why would I collect Beckers if I thought a corncob was such a great joy?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  27. chasingembers

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    Good Lord, Dunhills are even trying to look like cobs!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  28. cosmicfolklore

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    British pipes have just never really appealed to me. They are too... average looking too keep my interest. To each their own.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  29. cigrmaster

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    cos, I read this part of your post.

    I've been saying since I got here that I think it's the smoker more than the pipe. Some will site the bit, and the shape seems to transform the smoke as it hits their tongue into pure magic. Some will site that they can lay their pipe down and come back hours latter and it will still be burning cool. Some will argue that the hole drilled for the draft has to be engineered in some fashion for a pipe to even work, ha ha.

    This is where I think you were being dismissive. Plus the shot at Dunhill not being as good as a cob. Did I read this wrong? I have a bad memory and forgot you collected Beckers. I didn't get the impression you were saying your higher end pipes smoked better than cobs, from what you wrote.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  30. cosmicfolklore

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    I stand my words. I don’t argue that my Beckers, Castellos, or any of my pipes smoke better than a cob. I don’t even like cobs, but on something as subjective as quality, it’s moot. Argue till you’re blue in the face, but there’s always going to be that guy (or guys) who will beg to differ. Now, in my mind, I may have a different opinion, amd yes, I enjoy talking about the small differences that make one pipe better than another. But, it’s all still opinions.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  31. sablebrush52

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    We hear the words "a good smoker" ad nauseam, but no one says what they mean by this

    Do you read the threads?

    http://pipesmagazine.com/forums/topic/a-good-smoker

    http://pipesmagazine.com/forums/topic/a-good-smoker#post-1174362

    So, lots of people shared what they consider a "good smoker". But if you're looking for an objective set of rules, good luck! Like many of life's pleasures, smoking a pipe is largely a subjective experience.

    About the only thing that can be said with assurance is that $$$$$$$$$$$ does not necessarily translate to a better smoking experience.

    It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt. - Mark Twain

    It is pointless to argue with a fanatic since a dim bulb can't be converted into a searchlight. - Jesse Silver
    Posted 1 year ago #
  32. rhoadsie

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    The more things change the more they stay the same...

    http://pipesmagazine.com/forums/topic/is-it-a-good-smoker

    Posted 1 year ago #
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    elpfeife

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    Geez, Duane. I wouldn't count on Bruce Weaver giving you anymore pipes!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  34. saltedplug

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    Let's say that instead of buying pipes as we do, we had been told to forgo this for the greater joy of fashioning a pipe on the fly from available materials. So something round with an inch diameter becomes the chamber affixed to a tube for the shank/stem. And don't bother about the stem, too much trouble, just lip the tube end. Not saying this contraption would have anything close to the craft of even a factory pipe but using this for a more pure example of smoking for the smoke only. On the other side take the Chonowitsch on that site selling for $4K, which is used as an example for pipes as art, only. Surely "the smoke" combines from both sides, yet someone's appreciation for a pipe that "smokes better" is rarely precisely stated and quite usually leaves me with questions. Castello, Beckers, Barlings, Dunhills are hallowed time and again, held up to be "better."

    If art wins, why smoke? If "the smoke" wins, why not smoke contraptions, above? No, the "good smoker" is good both for art and the smoke.

    More, I've smoked some 150 pipes in my career, and I cannot tell the difference one to another, whether cob, briar or among briars. So much for my theorizing about the size of the chamber draft as well as the shank and stem drilling. "A pipe is a stick with a bowl, drilled down the center. Tobacco goes in the bowl and the end of the drilled stick in the mouth. Suck on that end to get smoke." This is certainly a simplification yet basically true. But some call the centered airway the "internals" and elevate it with the term "engineering." Maybe so, but to my mind drilling a hole through the center of the shank material that enters in the middle, bottom of the bowl is a clearer description than the elevated terms before. Then there are those who want to glorify the button for distributing the smoke across the tongue, and although I don't prefer premolded stems with a small rectangular bit draft, to me one is as good as the other, for the simple reason that when I suck through the bit, I get smoke in my mouth. If I want less smoke I suck less; more, ditto. Getting smoke in my mouth by drawing on the pipe is effortless and happens with bits open or not as open.

    To clarify, I like to smoke briars better than cobs, but for the act of smoking itself, which amounts to enjoying the incineration of tobacco by mouthing the smoke, a contraption will do.
    I drool over artisan pipes daily, and were my budget three or four times its current size, I'd have bought two or three dozen by now and would have enjoyed smoking them, but I would not be under the illusion that their art made them smoke better.
    The stem is important and can make or break a smoke. Just lately a pipe was lionized that to me had a chunky bit. It is such a great shape that I'd buy it to collect but not smoke.

    I love to talk pipes and find the contributors to this thread, at long last, are in sympathy with my views, defining the two sides of a "great smoker," the smoke and the art, with some precision.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  35. sablebrush52

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    Your all are correct. It is not a sad fact but a welcoming fact that the pipe snob in me died a little more.

    Well, that's a good thing, not a bad thing. If you're enjoying smoking a pipe, what difference does it make what the hell kind of pipe it is?

    My cobs smoke well enough for me, since I enjoy what I smoke in them. But they don't work with every blend that I like to smoke. My newest favorite is a large Barling from 1906. It's not a great pipe because it's from 1906. It's not a great pipe because it's a Barling. It's a great pipe because the blends that I've smoked in it have given me deep rich flavors. But no pipe is going to do it's best if the smoker doesn't know how to smoke it properly. If you don't know how to suck smoke, your smokes will suck.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  36. 3rdguy

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    Starting out on a pipe I was about to give up, then I tried a cob. I have imported my fair share of pipes but you just can't beat a cob.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  37. sablebrush52

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    More, I've smoked some 150 pipes in my career, and I cannot tell the difference one to another, whether cob, briar or among briars.

    Boy, I can. I wish I couldn't. Life would be much simpler. I've only have a couple of pipes that weren't pleasant smokers, blends tasted muted, the draw was tight, that sort of thing. But not all of my pipes perform equally well with all of the blends I smoke. But even here, price and performance weren't necessarily related.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  38. chilipalmer

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    If you don't know how to suck smoke, your smokes will suck.

    That is genius!

    Cheers,

    Chili

    “Pipe: a primary masculine symbol with authoritarian overtones but also indicative of reliability and contentment.”
    -The Dictionary of Visual Language, 1980
    Posted 1 year ago #
  39. unkleyoda

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    Some guys jar their tobacco, I jar my cobs.


    So you say you can drink? Well, I'm from Wisconsin. Try to keep up.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  40. saltedplug

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    Do you plan to age those cobs? I see that they are in a liquid presoak. Is this part of the new practice of cleaning by water? Very creative response!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  41. chasingembers

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    Geez, Duane. I wouldn't count on Bruce Weaver giving you anymore pipes!

    Nope, he retired.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  42. sablebrush52

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    Maybe so, but to my mind drilling a hole through the center of the shank material that enters in the middle, bottom of the bowl is a clearer description than the elevated terms before.

    Maybe, but not necessarily more accurate. Else, why do higher end makers polish the shank airway, polish the mortise chamfer and the stem airway? Why be concerned with the way the internals fit together? Why did Comoy's craftsmen bother to insert a steel tube in the shank for strengthening, as did so many French carvers in the early 20th century? Why did it matter? Why would an artisan carver like Scottie Persel choose to run a surgical steel tube the length of the shank on her Scottie pipes, with the tube emerging as a reverse tenon and creating an unbroken airway from the chamber to the slot?
    Why would Barling decide not only to make all of their own bowls, but to set up their own harvesting operations in Algeria? They could have bought briar on the open market like their competitors. Why would they choose to air cure their burl for years before cutting and shaping? Why would they dump the vast majority of it rather than make pipes with it? And when they lost their harvesting works after the Algerian War for Independence in 1954, why buy from everywhere, rather than only specific regions? Why would Dunhill have set up oil curing, or Sasieni oven curing? Why cure at all? Why use vulcanite? Why use "para rubber" grade vulcanite?
    Why do some artisans experiment with various tapered airways rather than a just stick with an accepted constant? Why go from an orific to a semi-orific slot and then to a wide slot? Why experiment with different methods of joinery? Why use albatross bone for a joining screw and then abandon it for a friction tenon? Why use an amber tenon and then switch to a vulcanite tenon for attaching the stem? Why devise a wide variety of stingers or other filters? Why develop a way to drill a curved airway? Why design a variety of buttons for various orthodontic conditions? Why develop thin flat stems at the button? Why experiment with different airway designs. Why bother to come up with a "bite proof" dual hole design? Why add a carburetor to the base of the bowl? Why create a space for oils and liquids to gather out of the path of the airway? Because there is no engineering involved?

    At it's most basic, a pipe is a tube. People used to sit around a pile of burning leaves and use reeds to sip the smoke. The tobacco pipe is therefore a bit of a step up, since it is portable. At it's most basic, it's a chamber for packing in the weed, with a tube attached for drawing the smoke into one's mouth. Consider it a portable leaf mound.

    And at its most basic, food is a mixture of fats, carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, and other nutrients. Suppose that prep doesn't matter, texture doesn't matter, flavor doesn't matter, color doesn't matter, appearance doesn't matter. Imagine a lifetime of a daily ration of "plop" called food. The basic definition may be clear, but it's by no means the whole of it.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  43. warren

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    An earthquake roused me from me bed.

    If a smoker is satisfied with a simple wisp of smoke in the mouth, more power to them. For me, the full enjoyment of a pipe is multi-faceted. The more of the facets met, the better the smoke. A PB and J provides sustenance. A well prepared and presented meal is however, a repast! Again, it all depends on what the smoker requires. I require certain tactile, visual, and taste sensations in order to enjoy a good smoke. An adequate smoke/pipe simply delivers the nicotine and taste. I can get this with nearly any pipe under any circumstances. A good smoke requires more.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  44. sablebrush52

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    I have imported my fair share of pipes but you just can't beat a cob.

    Nonsense. You can step on one and crush it, a hammer will smash one quite nicely. You could use a mallet, drop a suspended grand piano on it, toss it off the top of the Eiffel Tower. Really there are many many ways to beat a cob.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  45. jpmcwjr

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    My favorite way to beat a cob is to use it to pound tacks.

    Warren: righty-ho!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  46. cosmicfolklore

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    I tried to keep my initial post congenial. I get a headache when these posts go sideways.

    I hate it when a corncob toy pipe smoking jent, comes on a post where we are discussing real pipes and says, "get a corn cob, it smokes the best."

    Thus, I tried to avoid telling the toy pipe guys that their pipes aren't as good as mine. Then, of course, I should have expected it, a pipe bully comes on and challenges my statement as not being tough enough against the toy pipe guys. Errrrrrk, sideways!

    Basically, if you enjoy the heck out out of your pipe made of country boy toilet paper, enjoy it.
    If you like real pipes and can't understand the toy pipes, then we can just let them live in their own little reality. No one benefits from being awakened from a dream.
    If I didn't piss someone off, be sure to let me know, and I'll give it another shot.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  47. crashthegrey

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    There is the real Cosmic. Haha. I'm sorry, but I will always disagree that a cob smokes better than briar. It doesn't, and if you can't tell the difference then you are far different from me. Cobs are awesome for what they are, a piece of corn which smokes well enough to make a good shop or work pipe.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  48. cigrmaster

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    cos, I misunderstood your post. You were being sarcastic and I didn't get that. My bad.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  49. cosmicfolklore

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    No sweat. I didn't take offence to anything. Ha ha.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  50. chasingembers

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    My favorite way to beat a cob is to use it to pound tacks.

    Dunhills work well for concrete nails.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  51. pipestud

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    Cobs have no soul... and I've personally found just one that rated any higher than a 6 on the Smoker's 1-10 scale. And, I've smoked a lot of 'em. Guess I've been buying the wrong cobs.

    Pipestud
    Posted 1 year ago #
  52. menuhin

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    It's an interesting thread to read.

    There are connoisseur pipes, there are grass roots pipes - and they are not equal in many ways.
    It's not that smokers cannot get a good smoke in a grass roots pipe, and it's not that a beginner will not have the possibility to get a bad smoke from a connoisseur pipe. There is something more to it.

    To understand, let's think the most hyped beef in the world - Kobe beef. From the breeding lineage records down to the exact identified cows, from the meals and massage every week, to the mature time for the optimal marble patterns, these are all monitored by highly trained individuals. And then there is the years of apprenticeship for another individual that enables him to divide the cow into different parts for specialized ways of consumption. Finally, there is another long ladder of strict apprenticeship that the chief has climbed up so he is now responsible to select and cook the Kobe beef in front of the customers. This is one kind of enjoyment.

    One may say, the street wok fried beef he enjoyed in a random country during his SE Asia holiday tasted really good to him. Those are his taste buds, I just have to agree. It could be that the street food seller had been selling street food for 10 or 20+ years and he instead of his standby workers was working that day. But it's still a different kind of enjoyment.

    For a pipe manufacturer, such as Barling, that was responsible for creating smoking pipes for generations of reigns of the royal family, do you think they allowed workers who were not trained to their standard to produce pipes for the market? How about the sons or daughters of some artisan pipe makers, what amount of training they have gone through before their fathers agreed that was about time to have their debut pipe sales? Of course, the renowned MM cobs also have standards and quality control, but I believe their standard is different from say, Barling, or Dunhill. This is just my opinion.

    That being said, I have always been thankful to pipe manufacturers who create affordable pipes, so that beginners can try out pipe smoking more easily. I usually gift younger fellows to whom I introduced pipe smoking a MM cob with a pouch of tobacco - MM makes these present more affordable and I don't have to worry what they do to the cobs.

    One kind of pipes similar to MM cobs that are also affordable have been dying out. There used to be quite some people making pipes from cherry tree in Austria, but I have not (yet) heard of any maker exists as of today. They are the cherry wood pipes. They can smoke really good, if not better than a MM cob.


    For the "cherrywood" or cob looking Dunhill above, I own one example. That shape is actually called 'Don', a variant Dunhill created after the shape 'Duke' that Dunhill designed for Prince Edward, Prince of Wales.

    Perhaps he gave up his throne also because of his love of pipe smoking:

    I own no 'Duke'. This shape has no shank, resembles exactly the traditional cherry wood pipes and corn cobs. One may say, a pipe made like a grass roots cherry root, but with selected briar and by Dunhill's craftsmen - Voilà, then it becomes a prince's pipe, his favorite shape indeed according to some legend. Older models have usually the stems made of bone. Perhaps I may get one in the future, if I get into PAD again.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  53. cosmicfolklore

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    Menuhin, excellent!! This needs it's own thread. You should have just started a new thread. Great article.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  54. crashthegrey

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    Menuhin, very reflective. I agree that affordable pipes are necessary to get new smokers into the hobby, for lack of a better term. There is no need to glorify these affordable pipes, and you presented a very cool historical aspect instead.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  55. chasingembers

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    There is no need to glorify these affordable pipes,

    Nor is there a reason to glorify any of them. They are all portable ashtrays.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  56. sablebrush52

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    Nor is there a reason to glorify any of them. They are all portable ashtrays.

    I'll have you know I'm quite devoted to my ashtrays. My ashtrays have been very, very, good to me!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  57. User has not uploaded an avatar

    aldecaker

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    Well, I'm not going to "glorify" cobs, but cob is the ideal material for pipe bowls. Anyone who is not getting a better smoke out of their cobs than anything else is smoking them wrong.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  58. cigrmaster

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    adlecaker
    [/quote]Anyone who is not getting a better smoke out of their cobs than anything else is smoking them wrong.[quote]

    I just want to understand what you are saying. Because my flakes don't taste as good in a cob, and I get a better smoking experience in my briars, I don't know how to smoke? Am I understanding you correctly?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  59. cosmicfolklore

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    A pair of flip flops work trouble free without any upkeep nor skill in laces or knots. A ballpoint pen is trouble free, either it works or it doesn't, no skills in anything needed. A Ford Fiesta can get me to work and back with bare minimal skills in driving required.

    However, a nice pair of Italian leather shoes will last much longer, with class, but they require skills. Or a pair of cowboy boots. A nice calligrapher's pen offers much more options to the mark making, but do require skills. A Ford Platinum Fusion has paddle shifters, and requires much more skills but allows for much more aggressive driving and offers more options.

    A corncob is the flip flop, the ballpoint pen of pipes. No real skills needed. However, with a little more skill you can have a lot more options and aesthetics.

    It's the baby pacifier of pipes. It's idiot free. Load it and fire it up, and with all of the leaky seams, super absorbent shank, any moron can get a mediocre smoke out of it.

    Anyone who is not getting a better smoke out of their cobs than anything else is smoking them wrong.

    Turn this around, and if you are getting a much better smoke out of your corncob, maybe you just suck at smoking pipes in general, so the mediocre idiot proof cobs do give you excellent results. So, flip flops, ballpoint pens, etc... Jus' sayin'

    Posted 1 year ago #
  60. cosmicfolklore

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    Because my flakes don't taste as good in a cob

    Of course, everything tastes crappy in a corncob. Didn't MM and C&D have develop a special series of corncob tobacco, one that didn't suck? Ha ha.

    Carter Hall is about the only thing that doesn't smell like the inside of a rancid corn silo to me, when smoked in a CC. And, I only smoke them when I am in a situation where I wouldn't want to risk harming one of my real pipes.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  61. zack24

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    I have a very nice unsmoked corncob, and a few cheap ones I keep for guests...and just can't bring myself to smoke them when I have a bunch of fine briars, meers, and mortas in the case...I personally think the reason cobs smoke "so good" is that the airway is generally big enough to throw a cat through...I can compare any pipe with a restricted airway like some of the European pipes and definitely some of the older meers, and any pipe with an unrestricted airway and the holes drilled pretty much where they need to be. The pipe with the open airway will smoke better and with less tendency to gurgle than the restricted airway...

    Posted 1 year ago #
  62. sablebrush52

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    Anyone who is not getting a better smoke out of their cobs than anything else is smoking them wrong.

    Because my flakes don't taste as good in a cob, and I get a better smoking experience in my briars, I don't know how to smoke? Am I understanding you correctly?

    No, Harris, I don't think that you're understanding aldecaker correctly. He means that you have to smoke the cob correctly for it to work properly. About 1 to 2 hours gently turning the cob over a hardwood fire, and basting the cob regularly, is important to getting the best out of it.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  63. warren

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    And ... cobs are disposables! Cheap, so no great loss when dropped over board or under the wheel of the tractor. They have their place the rotation for the "all day" pipe smoker working outside.

    What rub would be right for smoking a cob? Marinade? Low and slow is the correct method I believe. Mesquite isn't right either. Hickory is the right smoke for a cob I believe. Mesquite is simply overpowering, you won't realize the innate sweetness of a cob. Never sauce a cob before serving. Put the sauce on the table and let the neophytes sauce if they must. Real cob smokers never use a topping or sauce.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  64. cosmicfolklore

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    My cholesterol sucks, but I have great blood pressure; so I just salt the hell out of them, without any butter or anything.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  65. warren

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    A true connoisseur you are.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  66. cigrmaster

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    jesse, so that is what I was doing wrong, thanks for the heads up.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  67. cosmicfolklore

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    You were wrong to try to smoke a cob. Get a real pipe, you hippie.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  68. User has not uploaded an avatar

    aldecaker

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    "...I don't know how to smoke? Am I understanding you correctly?"

    No, no. I'm not saying you don't know how to smoke. I'm just saying you don't know how to smoke cobs. Cobs are for the purist, the ascetic pipe smoker. Cob whisperers, if you will. Any old jackleg can win a race in a Maserati; only a true driver can burn rubber in a Yugo. If you have enough money, you can buy a fully-restored '57 Bel-Air. Only a real craftsman can pull one out of a junkyard and sell it to Mr. Moneybags at Barrett-Jackson.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  69. crashthegrey

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    Phew, good thing things didn't get ugly. Haha. I dig the flip flop analogy a lot. I don't grill my flip flops, though. That would be weird. I also don't own any flip flops.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  70. cigrmaster

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    aldecaker, lol ok I will have to practice now to become a cob whisperer. By the way, getting a Yugo to burn rubber is not very hard.

    Posted 1 year ago #

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