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The Other Kind Of Smoking (BBQ)

(23 posts)
  1. shanez

    shanez

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    Starting a little thread for everyone to post recipes and ideas for backyard smoking. Or you can just steal recipes from here if you want. Heck, you can even smoke your pipe while smoking your meat. It's smoke-ception?

    First up, stuffed and smoked jalapenos:

    I brown pork chorizo in a pan on the stove, chill it, mix it 50/50 with shredded extra sharp cheddar (I like Tilamook), stuff the mix into jalapenos, smoke them over a mix of apple & cherry wood for an hour/hour and a half at about 250 degrees.

    Phenomenal straight up or with a side of sour cream.

    I cut the tops off the jalapenos and use a butter knife to get all of the seeds/white stuff out of the insides to make room for the mix. Leave some of the seeds if you want to turn up the heat or you can put them in the meat/cheese mix for extra heat.

    I also use a jalapeno tray I got at wally world to hold them up (works best with smaller diameter peppers). I have to put a cookie sheet underneath or it makes a terrible mess inside my smoker.

    FYI, if you don't know what chorizo is, it's a type of Mexican sausage. Cut one end open and squeeze it out of its plastic tube. After it's simply browned in a pan, I like to think of it as a Mexican version of sloppy joe mix.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  2. mikethompson

    mikethompson

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    There is a Food & Drink forum, albeit a little dusty in there.

    I want to get a nice smoking rig set up for next year. Smoked jalapenos sound very nice. My town hosts Canada's largest ribfest at the end of the month, and if love to sink my teeth into some of those, maybe smoke some of my own next year. I have a pretty good rib recipe I can share, but there is no smoke involved though.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  3. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

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    1lb hamburger meat
    1 egg
    half a cup of dried mint (I sometimes use peppermint)
    Half a large onion diced
    several cloves of garlic chopped very finely
    a cup of feta cheese
    1 diced red jalapeno
    a teaspoon of Greek oregeno
    and a dash of cinnamon

    mix well, make into patties and grill
    I serve these with a slice of pickled beet on the burger.

    Also, when I grill steaks or chicken, I will take a few limbs off of one of my rosemary bushes (almost like trees) and smoke them with it. It instills a deep rosemary Greek-like flavor into the meats.

    Also, I will drizzle okra or asparagus in olive oil, powder with Greek spices, and parmesan, and then grill them for a fantastic side dish for lamb.

    ^great stuff!!!

    I could go on and on.
    I am a fan of triple grilling giant Marconi peppers. Griil first to remove skins, put in refrigerator. Grill again for color and to warm up. Stuff with a mixture of egg, bread crumbs and mozzarella cheese, and stuff them, and grill. Then serve over pasta covered in a homemade ragu or pasta sauce of choice.

    Michael
    Posted 1 year ago #
  4. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

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    For authentic Alabama white sauce for grilling chicken...
    1 quart mayonnaise.
    3/4 quart apple cider vinegar.
    1/2 cup corn syrup.
    1/4 tablespoon cayenne pepper.
    Prepared horseradish.
    Lemon juice.
    Salt and freshly ground black pepper.

    Mix and marinate, and then drizzle some on the grilled chicken when finished. It will blow your mind. This recipe was started at Big Bob Gibson's Barbeque in Decatur, AL. People used to line up around the block to buy his chicken on weekends.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  5. voorhees

    voorhees

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    I was the pit master at a BBQ restaurant for 4 years. One thing I learned is to keep it simple.

    Jason
    Posted 1 year ago #
  6. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

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    I think that is especially true for a restaurant. I agree 100%. But, sometimes I like to get all foodie on the grill. We grill about 80% of all of our meats, so we get tired of just straight smoked chicken. But, all of our steaks are unseasoned, 5 min, flip, 5 min, flip, 2 min, flip, 2 min, remove and rest for 10 minutes, and then eat. Nothing fancy.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  7. zack24

    zack24

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    I'm about to fire up a nice Paella in a cast iron pan in my Big Green Egg maybe this weekend. I love cooking in Cast Iron over charcoal- it's hard to beat.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  8. warren

    warren

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    Non fancy!

    Needed: Smoker, baking potatoes, bacon, coarse salt (sea salt preferred.

    Cook bacon, save bacon for topping.

    Poke potatoes two or three times with a fork, roll in bacon grease then, the salt.

    Smoker at or near 220 degrees, wood smoke of your choice, mine I mesquite or hickory. The smokier the better I think.

    Do not wrap potatoes in foil, that simply leads to steamed potatoes and soft, not crispy skin. A potato nail is suggested to speed the cooking.

    Place potatoes in smoke chamber, check back in half hour or so. Potatoes are done when the meat is malleable, a bit soft. The closer the spuds are to the fire chamber, the quicker they will cook. Duh!

    Potatoes will have a crispy skin and creamy inside. When you bite into a piece of salt it explodes with flavor.

    Split, top with the usual suspects and enjoy. I like them with tri-tips or other smoked or roasted beef. Grilled swordfish steaks and smoked potatoes is a great combination.

    A man without a shillelagh is a man without an expedient.
    Posted 1 year ago #
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    jeff540

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    Yes, simple setup with the Weber. Picked up about a cord of downed Bartlett pear and split it into firewood earlier this year. My curiosity go the better of me a a few months ago and tried it to augment lump charcoal. I now have to get more firewood for the winter....

    Posted 1 year ago #
  10. warren

    warren

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    Cosmic: How friggin' thick are your steaks that they can stand a quarter of an hour on the heat? Five six inches? Or, very low heat. I ain't knockin' your style, just wondering.

    I don't cook flavorful steak from old beeves, when I'm lucky enough to find it locally, that long and it's tough muscle, needs breaking down.

    I was totally and pleasantly surprised the first time I was served Alabama chicken in the white sauce. Perfect marriage, akin to pork and vinegar. Don't think about it, just eat and enjoy. I was a convert immediately.

    Posted 12 months ago #
  11. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

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    They are over an inch thick... maybe more, we dont buy thos thin t-bones. Let the charcoal burn down to a white ember, they come out red in the middle. I like mine just below medium. The key is letting it set after cooking to let the heat finish warning the center.

    White sauce chicken is a staple for summer meals for us. It also goes well with rabbit. I have some lamb and goat recipes, but I could go on and on...

    Posted 12 months ago #
  12. shanez

    shanez

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    Warren,

    I would never have thought to put a potato in my smoker but I'll be doing that soon. Thanks!

    Posted 12 months ago #
  13. weezell

    weezell

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    Cavender's is GLORIOUS stuff! Been using it for 30 years and LOVE it...

    "the weez"...
    Posted 12 months ago #
  14. bluto

    bluto

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    Smoked Atlantic salmon , about three hours , I use regular lump charcoal and a handful of dried fir , smattering of maple syrup to finish

    Serve over toasted bagels or eggs benny , or as swmbo eats it , by the forkfull

    “listen: there’s a hell
    of a good universe next door; let’s go”
    Posted 12 months ago #
  15. mikethompson

    mikethompson

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    Warren, I've tried doing your potatoes on the grill, but can't quite get it right. I've never heard of potato nails before, I will have to give them a shot.

    Posted 12 months ago #
  16. warren

    warren

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    Shouldn't grill, smoke only, low heat. Small grills, with heat to the side, indirect, Low heat is called for and a cover, need to be tended closely.

    A potato nail is aluminum, should be easy to find. I grew up with them and we sold them at the Ace store I worked in for a bit. I actually ordered them in for stock. But I've seen them in most any decent display of barbecue gear.

    Low heat and plenty of smoke is called for.

    Posted 12 months ago #
  17. warren

    warren

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    This might help: If the potato skin is browning ... too much heat. If the skin is getting covered with smoke ... you are on the right track.

    Posted 12 months ago #
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    bigpond

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    You guys owe it to yourselves to smoke some tofu or maybe grill some tasty Greek cheeses

    Posted 12 months ago #
  19. bluto

    bluto

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    I tried smoking tofu , but found it difficult to keep lit .

    Posted 12 months ago #
  20. akfilm

    akfilm

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    I have two smokers, one is strictly for fish, mainly salmon and trout, sometimes halibut, I do simple brines on those, the other smoker is for meats. My favorite is a moose brisket, covered in a Kansas city rub, wrapped in bacon and smoked over cherrywood, then thinly sliced and served. Also a big fan of smoked bear ribs over hickory or mesquite.

    Here's my salmon smoking recipe:

    A beer and a half (Good beer makes better brine)(Drink the other half while mixing this recipe)
    1/2 lb of brown sugar
    1/2 cup soy sauce
    A few good squirts of honey or agave
    6 tbs salt (heaping)
    2 tbs pepper
    A tablespoon or so of your favorite Seasoning salt
    Heat mixture until salt and sugar is dissolved; then cool it back down
    Add fish. I use skinless and boneless salmon; Sockeye (Red) is my favorite for smoking
    Soak 12 hours. Don't rinse
    Spray rack with Pam
    Spread fish on racks
    Brush honey or agave on it (Nuke the honey, to make it runny) (adds a sexy glaze)
    Sprinkle on some coarse ground pepper, or some Cajun spice
    Smoke 10 hours at 130 - 140 degrees. Just one hit of smoke chips at the beginning. Don't add
    more. I like Alder chips for a mellower smoke flavor.

    Posted 12 months ago #
  21. warren

    warren

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    Unfortunately, for me, I got "salmoned" out by the age of twelve or so. I won't turn down a well nicely prepared salmon steak when offered but, I won't go out of my way to catch or even purchase one. Sad, I know.

    A "berry" bear can be some of the tastiest food one will ever eat. A "fish" bear, for me, is at the opposite end of the spectrum. Fish should taste like fish. Bears should taste like ... blueberries! Yes, a bit like blueberries or some such.

    I can be just as picky with beef. A tough, old range steer has more flavor, cooked correctly, and beats the heck out of young one, particularly a mushy Kobe-like yearling, anytime. But, that's my palate, mixed with fond childhood memories of a butcher shop, sawdust on the floor, sides of beef hanging within view, bloody smocks and butchers with a lot of knowledge. Damned near impossible to find a tough, flavorful piece of beef these days, dry aged. It simply costs too much to raise and prepare for market. Less profit in doing it right, easier and cheaper to mount an ad campaign and change peoples eating habits.

    People, now days seem to prefer, boneless. flavorless, mushy meat. A purely personal observation based only on observation and other anecdotal information. The bone is seen as waste by many. Same with an abundance of fat (flavor). I don't eat the fat but, it's that's where the flavor comes from while cooking. People desire lean, tender, mushy steaks, over firm textured, full of beef taste and wee specks of fat (marbling) or a decent "fat cap", over flavor.

    The bone? Freeze them until you have a sufficient amount, crack them and make stew or a readily available stock. Marrow, yummmm!

    We have been trained by the beef producers to think "too young for market beef" as being what we should enjoy. It's why people use gravies such as A-1, H-P, béarnaise, etc. Mind you I'm not opposed to such when called for or desired (rank meat, tasteless meat), I simply prefer a more unadulterated dish.

    Posted 12 months ago #
  22. akfilm

    akfilm

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    YEP Warren! I smoke salmon for family mainly, and get it from trading bear, moose or caribou meat, not a fan of fishing for it anymore. All my bears are spring berry bears, I love them, I avoid fall bear.

    Posted 12 months ago #
  23. bluto

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    Definitely save and savor those beef bones , roast and cook them down to make bone broth , crazy good stuff , excellent base for ramen and Vietnamese pho.

    Posted 12 months ago #

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