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Retirement Morale

(23 posts)
  • Started 1 year ago by mso489
  • Latest reply from lifesizehobbit
  1. mso489

    mso489

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    I was lucky, in some ways, to be with an employer for many years before retirement. It gave me plenty of time for a few promotions and some variations in assignments. I was lucky that I only hit one institutional dust-up, which for a long career is pretty good. I saw plenty, of course. One thing I did observe was that about half the people retiring had strong negative feelings about the place. In some cases, they had simply not had a good experience. But in many other cases, it was my sense that this was a separation anxiety. The retirees were having to leave, so they had to think of every negative aspect of their experience in order to make the break less painful, or so they thought. Has anyone else noticed that people on the verge of retirement go into intense bad-mouthing to help them make the break.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  2. papipeguy

    papipeguy

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    I worked for the same company for 33 years. 4 months and 15 days. Yes, I did count. I also picked my retirement date when I first joined the company in 1974 at the age of 22. I think what you said has a lot of validity though I think that with long time employees it may be a case of negative feelings because things just are not the way they used to be and that is true of every company. For many it was difficult adapting to a new company culture where not doing things the way they used to be done is uncomfortable. There are many reasons why some would feel anxious about retirement. I was lucky and have enjoyed my extended vacation from day one. Did my company change over the years; you bet. I adjusted and kept my eye on the prize.

    Blowin' smoke since 1970.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  3. mikethompson

    mikethompson

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    What is this 'retirement' you speak of?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  4. tbradsim1

    tbradsim1

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    I retired at 55 because of Cancer, I'm now 75, lots of water under the bridge. When Exxon bought Mobil, I could see more changes, More HR people making it seem like they cared, not so. I knew when to hold them and when to fold them. Big tip, don't burn your bridges, thanked everybody, got my son hired and he's a 20 yr Man now. In life there is constant change, one newer saying that is so true Go With The Flow. That's my story and I'm sticking to it. PS 31.5 yrs with Exxon.

    The Old Cajun
    Posted 1 year ago #
  5. irishearl

    irishearl

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    I turn 65 in 8 months. Think I'd like to retire then, not because there's a bunch of negatives about my place of employment. Simply have little interest in my work any longer. Financially, though, it would better if I went to 66 but my employer is hinting it is preferred if I retire @ 65 due to their budget difficulties. Whenever the day comes, cannot really complain about the place.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  6. mso489

    mso489

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    brad, extremely wise approach. Not many can keep it all in perspective.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  7. didache

    didache

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    I've been retired for just over 3 months now - long enough that we have our retirement house more or less how we like it, and for my various pensions to kick in and start paying. Personally, I couldn't really badmouth my prior employer as it was a church and I was the minister!

    "Pipe-smokers spend so much time cleaning, filling and fooling with their pipes, they don't have time to get into mischief." - Bill Vaughan
    Posted 1 year ago #
  8. mso489

    mso489

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    didache, congrats on what sounds like a most dignified graduation to a new life. So much is perspective. Over my years with my employer, I also noticed how newcomers could see opportunities and possibilities that others couldn't. To them, it was all great raw material for new efforts and projects, though of course some soon felt otherwise, but others made a lot of it come true before they settled in more to a routine.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  9. puffy

    puffy

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    The company that I worked for wanted to reduce employees People out robots in. When I was 52 I had 30 years in.They offered to pay my pension.They also offered to pay my social security as well until I was 62 if I would retire then.I jumped at it..If there is a down side to my retirement it is that these days prices are rising faster than my income.

    Life's most valuable treasure is..Love
    Posted 1 year ago #
  10. warren

    warren

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    My first retirement, age 38, arose because the newly appointed Chief of Police was a person I couldn't honestly work for. After that, with retirement coming in I could afford to only work where I pleased. I still haven't formerly retired from the work force and am self-employed as a photographer. I feel a certain amount of sympathy for a person who retires to nothing. Unless, of course, that is the desire of the retiree. But, people who retire without a plan? I can't understand them.

    A man without a shillelagh is a man without an expedient.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  11. tuold

    tuold

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    I announced my retirement two and half years ago but my manager talked me into staying on the payroll as a safety compliance consultant. So I've been going in twice a month wondering the hospital corridors with a clipboard and BSing with my former coworkers.It's been fun, but now it's time to renew my license, do 20 hours continuing education and pay all the fees. I'm not inclined to do that anymore, so this is it....for sure!

    I'm looking forward to my exit interview because I do have some constructive suggestions, but I have nothing bad to say about anybody. I appreciate the support I've gotten from my supervisors, managers and coworkers over the years. No separation anxiety for me since I've been sort of easing into the retirement thing for so long.

    The pipe is an instrument of civilization.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  12. mikestanley

    mikestanley

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    Where I worked, the sign in the locker stated “The beatings will continue until morale improves.” I always smiled for the boss!
    Mike S.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  13. mso489

    mso489

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    By way of a confession that's not so intensely personal I can't share it here, I have thought from time to time, wondered, if i might be invited back, either to do contract work, or to serve on one of the citizen boards where they need people who understand the mission and scope of what we did. Of course, if I'd wanted that, I could have campaigned for it, made the rounds every few months, phoned up a few key players, and shown an interest. But I always wondered if I'd be asked, partly because I wasn't apple polishing. My retirement has not been disturbed. My field of endeavor, even within the organization, wasn't in the major field of pursuit of the organization. I was support staff. Then I wondered if I should sound around; and then of course, I decided I was better off not doing that. There are other life assignments I had better tend.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  14. lraisch

    lraisch

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    I have worked in the same field for 45 years. For 20 years I worked as a regional technical manager covering all or part of 8 states. I was pretty burned out on travel when the company decided to eliminate 76 people from that department, including me.

    There has been a lot of consolidation in this field for the last decade or so and the various companies I worked for since then were all acquired, merged or replaced and I ended up back at my old firm. I initially submitted my resignation last March but the cost of health insurance and other factors kept me there till this year when I couldn't take it anymore.

    I could never understand why, when the company would acquire some other firm which was failing, they would keep their management in place. Things got to the point where it was clear we were not valued.

    Now at 68 I have been lucky to find a place with a Mom and Pop firm where I am working three days a week. I'm hoping that will ease my workload and the stress of spending 3 to 4 hours a day fighting traffic while still earning a little.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  15. fishfly

    fishfly

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    I was 67 the August afternoon when one project came to a close and there were really no others appropriate for me. The company was trying to cut staff and I was in the middle of it. They gave me the choice of indefinite lay off or "early" retirement. I was planning (well, my wife was planning for me) to retire the following April. That was on a Wednesday. Thursday and Friday, I went through panic, disappointment, and fear. By Sunday, I was resigned to it. By Monday I was ecstatic. I was retired!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  16. irishearl

    irishearl

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    While the boss was hinting around that I should think about retiring @ 65, she also spoke of hiring me part-time thereafter. Would seriously consider that, but only if I needed the $.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  17. didache

    didache

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    mso489 - on a somewhat similar note to your own situation, the big question facing me is: Do I want to continue to conduct services, or do I genuinely and finally retire?

    Like you I have not actively sought any engagements but even so I now have six of them in my diary - either one or two a month through September, in two different churches. I am regarding these opportunities as a 'test' in that I will hopefully know come October what the answer to my question will be.

    Mike

    Posted 1 year ago #
  18. mso489

    mso489

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    didache, they love 'ya and want your professional services. But don't be cowed if you find there are other life pursuits you feel you should do. The pure duty part is over. Now you get to decide, and that should be a joyful thing.

    I was lucky to have a day job that used a number of my abilities, and I had my own time to do my own work. So I was working with and for scientists and administrators who had been scientists, and provided writing, editing, and some communications consulting along with that. Got to do a wide variety of demanding tasks. But when i succeeded big, the scientists assumed it was totally their doing, and if I didn't, it was all my fault. No boo-hoo, just came with the territory. In terms of earning a living, I was extremely lucky.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  19. pepesdad1

    pepesdad1

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    I retired at age 71 from the Labor Dept with the State of Florida, or better known as Floriduh. I had medical issues and the pain of going into work was so severe that I went in sometimes at 4AM did what was needed and left around noon. My boss said he appreciated all my work and the fact that I left a file for him and my replacement so that work continued uninterrupted. My wife was able to retire at the same time after 20 years with the State, we had had enough. We love being retired and being able to enjoy the day with our sweet dog. Money is considerably less but enjoying life is much more important.
    Working and being miserable is no way to live.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  20. warren

    warren

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    Working and being miserable is no way to live.

    Absolutely right! I consider myself to be fortunate to have never had a job I didn't enjoy and was challenged by. Some were more fulfilling than others but, I never kept a job I didn't enjoy doing, life's too short. I guess it all depends on what one wants out of life.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  21. lifesizehobbit

    lifesizehobbit

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    I'm 58 with just shy of 28 years at my current employer. Part of my perspective on work is that not only has the company culture changed, but that I have changed also. When I first began work, I had goals of career advancement and making a difference for the company and customer. That led me to a managerial role (after surviving a downsize) which led me to 70-80 hour work weeks, high stress and open heart surgery at age 47. I no longer desire career advancement, but I still want to make a difference in my role which means saying things that are hard perspective for people who are on the "budget focused" decision tree. I am learning to come to grips that the dollar savings often outweigh obvious pot holes in the decided direction; my personal view of what is "right" is frequently overlooked and that's a pill to swallow.

    I now look forward to retirement, and I bear no ill will to my employer. I've had a great ride and made great contacts with co-workers and a few good friends. I wish them nothing but the best when my time to move on occurs (whether by downsize or by retirement).

    Dave "Black Frigate Stowaway"
    Posted 1 year ago #
  22. mso489

    mso489

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    lifesize', that's a momentous comeback from major-major surgery at a young age. Such an experience nearly always transforms ones sense of values and life goals, or at least refines and deepens them. It sounds like you have gained and earned perspective from all of this, and I hope you will give yourself every consideration in life transitions. You deserve it.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  23. lifesizehobbit

    lifesizehobbit

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    Thanks MSO; you are right that such a personal event offers opportunity. I'm a strong believer in how you respond to circumstances is more important than the circumstance itself. Skating the rules a bit, I will simply say I am a Believer and place a lot of trust in God. My heart event really helped me gain deeper trust and a better sense of priority in my life. I will also very openly credit my employer, they worked with me to change roles that was part leader and part contributor. I now work a manageable 40-45 hours a week, am engaged in church and my myriad of hobbies. I see/spend time with my wife and family as well as friends. So even if sometimes I'm tempted to get irritated at work, I usually am able to let it go after a short period of time.

    I truly feel blessed.

    Posted 1 year ago #

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