banner

Pipes Magazine » Pipe Talk

Search Forums  
   
Tags:  No tags yet. 

Remembering Brave Men

(27 posts)
  1. seldom

    seldom

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 581

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Smoking a pipe and remembering that 75 years ago was D Day. Here's to the men that fell, the ones who were wounded physically and psychologically, and the ones who survived. I promise them that I will confront fascism however I can, whenever and wherever I encounter it.


    Seldom Seen
    Posted 1 month ago #
  2. mikethompson

    mikethompson

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2016
    Posts: 3,774

    online

    Login to Send PM

    I was lucky enough to see the landing beaches in Normandy several years ago. Very powerful place. We toured the Canadian Museum there as well, and there was a display of artifacts that were dug up during the construction.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  3. troyniss

    troyniss

    Junior Member
    Joined: Jul 2018
    Posts: 88

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I can't really think of any time after World War 2 that such an invasion has taken place, let alone the mass logistics and courage.
    Of course, I am not throwing service members under the bus by saying that they don't and haven't made sacrifices, but I think that D-Day is so well studied and understood that it even resonates with people that have never seen war and has become sort of the epitome of courage and honor.

    I have watched Band of Brothers probably about 5 times and am always left with a weird feeling. I suppose some things cannot be explained, just felt.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  4. tbradsim1

    tbradsim1

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 7,727

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I’m sharing a story I know to be true. We fought and saved the World from oppression, not by ourselves but with our Allies. My good friends son-in-law was a B2 Bomber Pilot stationed in England, I had met him in the States when he had his first child. When they bombed Gadaffi theMilitary asked for permission for flyovers , they were denied, going around them exhausted the fuel the planes had and flameout occurred coming back home, losing pilots. How soon they forget!

    The Old Cajun
    Posted 1 month ago #
  5. ashdigger

    ashdigger

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2016
    Posts: 5,241

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Much respect and gratitude.

    Ubi Ignis Est?
    Posted 1 month ago #
  6. chilipalmer

    chilipalmer

    Member
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 126

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    On this day, 75 years ago, my father was among those who received this message:

    Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force!

    You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have
    striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. The
    hopes and prayers of liberty-loving people everywhere march with you.
    In company with our brave Allies and brothers-in-arms on
    other Fronts, you will bring about the destruction of the German war
    machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over the oppressed peoples of
    Europe, and security for ourselves in a free world.

    Your task will not be an easy one. Your enemy is well trained, well
    equipped and battle hardened. He will fight savagely.

    But this is the year 1944! Much has happened since the Nazi triumphs of
    1940-41. The United Nations have inflicted upon the Germans great defeats,
    in open battle, man-to-man. Our air offensive has seriously reduced their
    strength in the air and their capacity to wage war on the ground. Our Home
    Fronts have given us an overwhelming superiority in weapons and munitions
    of war, and placed at our disposal great reserves of trained fighting men.
    The tide has turned! The free men of the world are marching together to
    Victory!

    I have full confidence in your courage and devotion to duty and skill in
    battle. We will accept nothing less than full Victory!

    Good luck! And let us beseech the blessing of Almighty God upon this great
    and noble undertaking.

    SIGNED: Dwight D. Eisenhower

    Cheers,

    Chili

    “Pipe: a primary masculine symbol with authoritarian overtones but also indicative of reliability and contentment.”
    -The Dictionary of Visual Language, 1980
    Posted 1 month ago #
  7. the85boro

    the85boro

    New Member
    Joined: Feb 2019
    Posts: 47

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I know my story is not related to D-Day but it is related to WWII. In college while attending Middle Tennessee State University, I was invited by Dr. Derek Frisby to join him and a select group of historians and anthropologists on Peleliu in 2010 in the island nation of Palau for 1 month. It was the location of the fiercest and bloodiest fighting on the smallest area of land between the Japanese forces and US Marines. The entire island is 6 miles long by 2 miles wide and over 13,000 casualties occured there in 77 days of fighting. The heat was on another level. We were in tactical pants for protection against the sharp coral rocks and T shirts. I can not imagaine all the gear the Marines had to carry in heat that routinely peaked 100 degrees and thick humidity. Hell on earth is a proper description. Peleliu is where the infamous painting "The Thousand Yard Stare" was penned and it couldn't be more accurate. We mapped out miles of trails and locations where unexploded ordinance lay to warn future wanderers. I was nicknamed the "cave rat" due to my experience with small arms, explosives and "booby traps." Many of the caves were so wrought with explosives that the floor looked as if it was covered in rocks although it was Japanese knee-mortars and hand grenades 90% of the time.

    The human remains I found were documented and both governments notified so they could be exhumed and interred. It was a very moving 30 days to say the least. If any of you know of that battle then you know the ferocity and torment both sides went through. I could go on for hours about this venture and effort to better the island and to map out a battlefield so future generations will never forget the tremendous sacrifices made there by the greatest generation to ever live.

    God Bless America. D-Day 06-06-1944. Point Du Hoc

    Leaves Into Ash
    Posted 1 month ago #
  8. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2015
    Posts: 13,351

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Thanks, Chili. Do you have an exact date? (the body says 1944, so wondering how far in advance of D-Day it was).

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    Posted 1 month ago #
  9. bnichols23

    Bill Nichols

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 2,593

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    landing beaches in Normandy several years ago. Very powerful place. We toured the Canadian Museum

    I'm envious, Mike. I've never been there; maybe before I shuffle off.

    Bill

    Head Black Frigate keelhauler, boss powder monkey, & troublemaker 1st class.
    Posted 1 month ago #
  10. bnichols23

    Bill Nichols

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 2,593

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    He started drafting it in February, John, & it was distributed to the landing force on June 5th. The document itself isn't dated, but there's a color graphic of it here, along with more info.

    https://www.archives.gov/historical-docs/todays-doc/?dod-date=606

    Bill

    Posted 1 month ago #
  11. prairiedruid

    prairiedruid

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2015
    Posts: 1,686

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    He started drafting it in February, John, & it was distributed to the landing force on June 5th. The document itself isn't dated, but there's a color graphic of it here, along with more info.

    It wasn't dated for several reasons. One is if German spies procured a copy and tip off the high command. The other is that the day of the invasion was moved many times due to weather.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  12. mso489

    mso489

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 25,955

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Churchill didn't like the D-Day plan. He was an old military guy. Eisenhower wrote a letter in case of failure taking full responsibility for failure. The soldiers and sailors going ashore knew that there was a high probability of getting killed or maimed. They all knew by then that being in top physical condition, having trained rigorously, and having strong will and great attitude wouldn't save them from lead and high explosives. As in most battles, part of the shrapnel was bone and body parts. A lot of the artillery overflew its target. Going ashore was a sort of suicide with the possibility of reprieve, with months of pitched battle ahead. All in the hands of the angels, as it were.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  13. bnichols23

    Bill Nichols

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 2,593

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    It wasn't dated for several reasons. One is if German spies procured a copy and tip off the high command. The other is that the day of the invasion was moved many times

    Yup, exactly, druid. The operational window problem was a REAL mess for Ike & his 6 weather guys. What a choice: unacceptable delay, catastrophe, or oh-what-the-hell....

    All in the hands of the angels, as it were.

    Is true truth that, for sure. There were enough disasters associated with it as it was, & yet it came off effectively. DD tanks foundering, tide problems, Pathfinders landing miles off target, etc., etc., etc.... Sheesh.

    B

    Posted 1 month ago #
  14. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2015
    Posts: 13,351

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Thanks, Bill. Here it is.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  15. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2015
    Posts: 13,351

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    He started drafting it in February, John, & it was distributed to the landing force on June 5th. The document itself isn't dated, but there's a color graphic of it here, along with more info.
    It wasn't dated for several reasons. One is if German spies procured a copy and tip off the high command. The other is that the day of the invasion was moved many times due to weather.

    Of course. I did not mean was there a date on the document, but on what date was it distributed.

    And, yeah, the date was annoying as hell, being so uncertain. My dad had some tales regarding the logistics in the Navy.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  16. bnichols23

    Bill Nichols

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 2,593

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Right, I followed you, complete. I just noted it since a lot of people would've expected something like that to have a date on it. I knew the historians & types with operational experience would all know why.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  17. alaskanpiper

    alaskanpiper

    Member
    Joined: May 2019
    Posts: 638

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I am the first man in the direct line since we came to America from Ireland in 1750 to not have to fight in a major war. From William Bell who was a private in the revolutionary war (he made 6 and 2/3 dollars a month!) to my father who is a purple heart Vietnam veteran (1st Lieutenant) every single one has put their life on hold and at risk for their country. This includes my grandfather who fought in the European theater in WWII, and passed away at an early age in 1968 to due health complications as a result of his service.

    Not a day goes by that I don't remember and acknowledge what a pure miracle it is that I am here today. And I owe every minute of it to the bravery and skill of the men who came before me and fought so that someday, someone like me may be able to live without having to put his life at risk, or take the life of another man, to live in peace in the greatest country in the world. Even more so, I owe it to those who fought beside them, and paid the ultimate price, such as those we should all be remembering today who did so during the Normandy Invasion. Without them, my forefathers would not have survived. Victory may not have been attained. And I very well may not be here today enjoying the privileges of peace that my ancestors have fought for over the last 300 years.

    I had the privilege of visiting the Normandy memorial in France many years ago, and I still get shivers when I think about what it was like to stand above that beach and see the endless rows of white crosses. I hope everyone takes a minute today to remember and appreciate the meaning of what these men did for the world. Although only those who were there may truly be able to comprehend that. So, today I have a truly thankful heart, and I raise my glass to those men, to all who serve our country, and especially to their brothers who's story ended today, 75 years ago.

    Thank you all! What you have done for me, my family, this country, and the world, will never be forgotten.

    "We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well that death will tremble to take us." ---Hank

    "Yeah, well, you know that's just like, uh, your opinion, man..." --- The Dude
    Posted 1 month ago #
  18. User has not uploaded an avatar

    jojoc

    Junior Member
    Joined: May 2019
    Posts: 61

    online

    Login to Send PM

    I had the honor of visiting Normandy about a week after 9/11. To this day, one of the most moving experiences of my life. It was a drab, cool, windy day with low clouds, with the threat of storm in the air. Much as I imagine it was on that day, 75 years ago. Looking out to sea across the vastness of the sand, the remains of pill boxes and other defenses, the cliffs of Point du Hoc, I cannot put to words the feelings that still come as I think of it. The German's had ever advantage. The fact that D-Day succeeded is an amazing testament to girt, guts, and determination, not to mention some luck or Divine intervention.

    May we never forget! Sadly, as the rise of nationalism seems to be growing across the world, I fear that the lessons of WWI and WWII are being lost.

    Thank you to all of have served, to help preserve and protect the freedoms we have!

    Posted 1 month ago #
  19. mso489

    mso489

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 25,955

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Not to distract from D-Day, but my Uncle Dick, Dad's older brother, was at the battle of Tarawa, the first amphibious attack on an island in the Pacific, and the most violent and painful learning curve. He was the skipper of a landing craft that also delivered oil drums for fuel to the beaches. He received a bronze star for figuring out, in a hurry, that with proper timing, the tide would deliver the barrels to the beach without getting them, and everyone involved, blown to pieces. He'd grown up around the water on the shores of Lake Michigan and was nautical-saavy his whole life. He was re-building his tractor engine in his eighties. Lived into his nineties. A survivor indeed.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  20. tulsagentleman

    tulsagentleman

    Member
    Joined: Feb 2019
    Posts: 193

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I would not presume the eloquence of Alaskanpiper but will add that I visited the Normandy beaches and the American Cemetary above them in June of 2000. I don't think that many Americans who visit that hallowed ground can avoid finding tears in their eyes when looking out over the sea of crosses and stars of David there. Most have names inscribed, but the ones which are inscribed “HERE RESTS IN HONORED GLORY A COMRADE IN ARMS KNOWN BUT TO GOD” are perhaps the most poignant.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  21. chilipalmer

    chilipalmer

    Member
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 126

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    May we never forget! Sadly, as the rise of nationalism seems to be growing across the world, I fear that the lessons of WWI and WWII are being lost.

    Never, ever, confuse nationalism with National Socialism. Were it not for Winston Churchill standing as the living embodiment of British nationalism, that nation would have been lost. Likewise, were it not for the intense American nationalism particularly manifested in the belief of individual freedom and defiance to totalitarianism and oppression, the United States would likely have simply made peace with Germany, leaving Hitler to pursue his terrible plans.

    Cheers,

    Chili

    Posted 1 month ago #
  22. kcghost

    kcghost

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 2,345

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    They were truly heroes.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  23. ssjones

    ssjones

    Mod
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 14,522

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    A raised pipes to those brave men indeed.

    If you ever have the opportunity to go to the D-Day Museum in New Orleans, don't pass it up. They have WWII vets on the main floor that you can speak to about their experiences. The landing boats were made in New Orleans. On our last visit, I was able to chat with a landing boat pilot, amazing. I had my WWII veteran father with me on that trip, the museum folks saw his hat and gave him a privately guided tour. He was near blind by that point, so they let him handle many of the items on display. The Imax film narrated by Tom Hanks is pretty moving. We hadn't considered the impact to my mother, a WWII refuge, who was drive from her home in Hungary by the Nazi's, then again by the Russians to avoid Communist rule. She started crying after the film and all the spectators wanted to know what was wrong. She told them her story, so that was a pretty incredible experience as well.

    RIP those who gave their all.

    Al

    Posted 1 month ago #
  24. mikethompson

    mikethompson

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2016
    Posts: 3,774

    online

    Login to Send PM

    I tried finding it in my all my stuff, but I did find a small pocket bible at a junk store once which was given to British troops in WWII. The first page had a little inscription from the King as well as the words to the three National Anthems (British, American and Soviet). The things that little book must have went through.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  25. mso489

    mso489

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 25,955

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Hearing those surviving D-Day vets tell about their experiences, the shear misery and narrow escapes, and all the death they saw, redefines heroism.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  26. tenton

    tenton

    New Member
    Joined: Jun 2019
    Posts: 27

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Going to try my first attempt at adding a photo, why does it have to be so complicated.

    Anyway here's a photo of my dad at Normandy.

    He was in the Navy and drove one of the small landing craft boats at D-day.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  27. ssjones

    ssjones

    Mod
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 14,522

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    What an amazing contribution to history Tenton! I hope that picture is storied somewhere safely (and every family member has a reprint)

    Posted 1 month ago #

Reply

You must log in to post.

 

 

    Back To Top  | Back to Forum Home Page

   Members Online Now
   jfred, jiminks, jojoc, chasingembers, craig61a, donjgiles, mindglue, jabomano, oldgeezersmoker, mikethompson, greeneyes