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Rant - I'm Sure I'm Not Alone

(81 posts)
  • Started 2 years ago by mcitinner1
  • Latest reply from mackeson
  1. mcitinner1

    mcitinner1

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    Stan
    Godfrey Daniels!!
    The Plenipotent Key to Cope's Correct Card of the Peerless Pilgrimage to Saint Nicotine of the Holy Herb:
    Posted 2 years ago #
  2. hakchuma

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    what?

    "From tempers be it known that we are warm in the fields of battle and cool in the hours of debate"

    - Pushmataha, Choctaw Chief
    Posted 2 years ago #
  3. cynicismandsugar

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    Posted 2 years ago #
  4. jefff

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    no, you aren't.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  5. mcitinner1

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    If you have to ask.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  6. ashdigger

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    It goes in waves. Some folks can't even find the rules but that doesn't stop them.

    Ubi Ignis Est?
    Posted 2 years ago #
  7. pagan

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    You are not alone !

    Nowhere in the world will such a brotherly feeling of confidence be experienced as amongst those who sit together smoking their pipes
    Posted 2 years ago #
  8. mayfair70

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    I noticed a couple days ago how many thread titles were not properly capitalized. Then I thought of you Mcitinner1. Keep fighting the good fight. I am behind you 100%.

    The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you’ve got it made. -Groucho Marx
    Mouse-catcher on The Black Frigate
    Posted 2 years ago #
  9. mso489

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    Like turn signals, some cars have them and it seems some cars don't.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  10. sothron

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    WHAT?

    Posted 2 years ago #
  11. rhoadsie

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    Posted 2 years ago #
  12. cortezattic

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    I have to remind myself that it's difficult to switch to/from caps on some platforms.

    I find myself sitting idly on the line dividing past and future,
    as if I could kill time without injuring eternity. -- Thoreau
    Posted 2 years ago #
  13. woodsroad

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    So I just received about 35 pounds of free tobacco from a forum member, mostly Stonehaven and Penzance in sealed bags....

    Posted 2 years ago #
  14. theloniousmonkfish

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    punkshoeasian is dead

    Posted 2 years ago #
  15. ashdigger

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    Woods, your garden will really Bloom with that much compost.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  16. woodsroad

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    You really compost Esoterica? I use it as a weed killer.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  17. jpmcwjr

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    So I just received about 35 pounds of free tobacco from a forum member, mostly Stonehaven and Penzance in sealed bags....

    Then I won't feel bad about having a lot more Smyrna than your one tin....

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    Posted 2 years ago #
  18. woodsroad

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    Actually, I have a tin and a half.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  19. jpmcwjr

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    Thank the Lord and pass the ammunition!

    —just an almost random tagline:

    Coach: "Are you just ignorant, or merely apathetic?"
    Player: "Coach, I don't know, and I don't care."

    Posted 2 years ago #
  20. jvnshr

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    Totally support you, sir.

    Javan
    Posted 2 years ago #
  21. pappymac

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    I am always amazed at people who spend 30,000 on a new vehicle but are two cheap to pay for the turn signal option.

    I am glad we have a good admin and responsible moderators.

    Heave to you dark colored ship under sail! Prepare to be boarded!
    Posted 2 years ago #
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    aldecaker

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    Whenever you feel like the most useless person in the world, just remember that somewhere in Germany, some poor bastard is wasting his life installing turn signals on BMWs.

    A man who serves his country is a patriot. A man who serves his government is an employee. The two are not always the same thing.
    Posted 2 years ago #
  23. woodsroad

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    I THINK I'M MISSING SOMETHING HERE.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  24. lostandfound

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    Using the shift key isn't hard; but, neither is existing as someone who isn't bothered by something so trivial. Then again... How much fun would life be without some things to be irritated, annoyed, and agitated by...

    Jerod
    Posted 2 years ago #
  25. warren

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    I always wonder why? Why someone, with something they think others should read, does not take the time to make it easy to read and understand? Why take the time to post an opinion if few will take the time to read it?

    Of course there are those who simply enjoy irritating mcitinner1, some others and me. To them, I award the "Flying Fickle Finger." Job well done! Mission accomplished.

    Those which are simply unlettered or possibly simply lazy? You folks get nothing. No medals for simple participation here. You unlettered can learn. Those of you who are simply lazy? No cure for that I'm afraid, that ship sailed during your extended childhood.

    Trivial? Hardly! The inability to present a thought is sad. A reflection on the poster, his teachers and his parents.
    An unwillingness to take the time to post a literate message, to me, exhibits a disdain for the other members which also reflects poorly on the writer, parents and educators. There is also the image a self-centered individual who over values his importance and his message, expecting the readers to spend time decoding the message. My time is too valuable for that.

    Yes, I am an aingisioir. An Irish term not readily translatable into English. Closest would be curmudgeon which is too blunt to be a literal translation.

    A man without a shillelagh is a man without an expedient.
    Posted 2 years ago #
  26. stvalentine

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    While I can establish some understanding for you native English speakers I am quite annoyed when Germans use only small letters in their writing. Texts becomes really incomprehensible in German!

    In short: I am totally with you!

    "Ride it like you stole it!"

    The Old Swede
    Posted 2 years ago #
  27. ophiuchus

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    Word.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  28. mayfair70

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    +1 on German writing and Lazy People.

    You know what gets my goat? Egyptian Demotic script. The Germans called it Frühdemotisch.

    Since cursive writing is no longer taught in schools, we older folks will have a secret writing system all to ourselves in 20 years.


    Posted 2 years ago #
  29. theloniousmonkfish

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    "Since cursive writing is no longer taught in schools"

    Seriously? Cursive isn't a thing anymore?

    Posted 2 years ago #
  30. mayfair70

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    Exactly. I thought it was a great thing to help kids with fine motor skills. But no room for it now, I'm told.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/21/opinion/handwriting-just-doesnt-matter.html?_r=0

    Posted 2 years ago #
  31. p4ttythep3rf3ct

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    Like, who's still using cursive on the regular, though? I bet even the Merchant Marine fancy Navy cursive is now nothing but a legend.

    Edit: ill even go so far as to say all handwritten text is doomed and soon. There is little need where there are computers.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  32. cosmicfolklore

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    Since cursive writing is no longer taught in schools

    That cursive is no longer taught in schools is just a myth. My oldest is an elementary school teacher, and she has to teach writing. Things like this get passed around on social media until they become a part of the mythos.

    Anyways, this is all I gotta say about...

    Michael
    Posted 2 years ago #
  33. ophiuchus

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    A friend, who's also a mom, tells me cursive is still being taught in school today (Chicago area).

    -*WHEW!*

    Posted 2 years ago #
  34. toobfreak

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    Exactly. I thought it was a great thing to help kids with fine motor skills. But no room for it now, I'm told.

    As already stated by others, some schools tried to stop teaching handwriting for a while but most have gone back or are in the process of going back to teaching it, because more than just teaching motor skills, it is a fundamental aspect of developing mental skills and the ability to think for oneself.

    To Master Po: Is it not being able to see that makes you tire of life?
    Master Po: No! It is being able to hear!
    Posted 2 years ago #
  35. cosmicfolklore

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    My own handwriting is atrocious. I did very well in school in handwriting in elementary school, but by graduation I had to take notes at such a hurried rate in class that I sort of developed my own sort of sloppy, short-hand. I think that if we at least "know" how writing works, we can at least decode each other's messages with fewer misunderstandings. But, if you guys would like to help us with the horse...

    Posted 2 years ago #
  36. mayfair70

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    I'm VERY glad I am wrong. I was going by what I had heard on the news and from my nieces' schooling. What is this social media you speak of? I always thought you could tell a lot about someone by their handwriting and feel it is an art-form in and of itself.

    all handwritten text is doomed and soon.

    How quickly we forget the impending apocalypse and accompanying loss of electricity. Not to mention the Zombies. We'll be scribbling on stones again soon enough.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  37. warren

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    Only the ill-bred and lazy have stopped hand writing thank you notes. Granted, texting has become the method of choice corresponding and indeed conversing in many cases. Still, taking the time to hand write a thank you note, a letter of condolence, and such is the only polite, personal and adult way to convey sincerity and concern. Texting, tweeting, etc are fast and, if nothing else, impersonal, indicative of the writer's lack good manners. Such communication simply says the writer really doesn't care enough about you to take the time to think and compose a personal message.

    Of course I'm old. I do not understand many of today's young adults shying away from even face to face communication.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  38. stvalentine

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    But, if you guys would like to help us with the horse...

    Err... no! But having issues with atrocious handwriting too I quite happy about computers.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  39. p4ttythep3rf3ct

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    Only the ill-bred and lazy have stopped writing thank you notes? Lol, ok.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  40. downinit

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    Shouldn't it be McItinner1?

    [No man has the] right to mislead others, who have less access to history, and less leisure to study it. . . . Thus substituting falsehood and deception for truthful evidence and fair argument.
    — Abraham Lincoln, Cooper Union Address, 1860
    Posted 2 years ago #
  41. downinit

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    Rules? we don't need any stinkin' rules!

    Posted 2 years ago #
  42. mcitinner1

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    Edit: ill even go so far as to say all handwritten text is doomed and soon.

    ???Explain...Shouldn't I be what?

    Posted 2 years ago #
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    aldecaker

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    I agree with Warren. Nothing says "I actually give a shit" like a handwritten message sent the old-fashioned way. Even if it's just a store-bought card with something personal jotted down inside, it carries a lot of weight.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  44. ashdigger

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    Aldecaker, when I write thank you cards I use a gorgeous hand made paper that utilizes fiber that has been digested by an endangered animal and a dip pen that utilizes a rare, yet sustainable flower that I mash into a liquid and age in remote caves for two years.

    Because I care so much.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  45. User has not uploaded an avatar

    aldecaker

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    That's not caring. I smash my fingers with a ball peen hammer until the bones are the consistency of a paintbrush, then use my own blood to paint a word picture conveying my heartfelt emotions. That's caring.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  46. toobfreak

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    OK, I probably shouldn't go into this on a pipe forum, but some broad generalities: Copybook writing where each letter is perfectly formed just as shown on the blackboard, can be a sign of lack of mental or emotional maturity. Or it might be a sign of overt attention to organization. Secretaries and office people often have "nice" writing. 'Sloppy' writing might be a sign of poor thought processes, too many interests at one time pulling you in many directions, or individuality. Once you begin to exceed the sum of what you've been taught to become your own person, you start to deviate from the copybook forms. Some of the smartest people are sloppy writers.

    Most kids these days have poor cursive writing and tend to print block letters as individual symbols. What do they look at all day long? Printed text! They often do not learn how to think for themselves because all schools teach is to follow directions. Think of your handwriting as putting on paper a picture of the way you think. Cursive writing involves taking one idea and connecting it with another and another to form a complete thought just as the letters flow from one to the next and the next.

    Handwriting a thing of the past? Not quite yet. Though there is a big push to make documents all electronic, nothing is more inexact or easy to steal, copy or forge than your signatures on those electronic pads such as at the supermarket! Do they even look at all like your real, everyday writing? It is all driven by a desire for speed and cost-effectiveness, but nothing is more secure than your genuine signature in ink on a sheet of paper. So be an individual: smoke your pipe and keep signing your name on paper using a thick, fat fountain pen!

    As to the OP's point, never before have we seen so many people who cannot think, write and type because schools and kids have raised and are being raised with an overt preoccupation with smartphones and spellcheckers to do it for them. The world of the Millennial is not the real world of people and events, just look at them-- their world is inside that tiny electronic box they carry in their pocket and cannot put down for 5 minutes! Most kids have no idea about the real world anymore and barely know how to interact face to face.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  47. ophiuchus

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    OK, I probably shouldn't go into this on a pipe forum, but some broad generalities:

    You'd be the first, right?
    Think of your handwriting as putting on paper a picture of the way you think. Cursive writing involves taking one idea and connecting it with another and another to form a complete thought just as the letters flow from one to the next and the next.

    I like how you think. The scratch and glide of the well-worn nib of a fountain pen on cotton parchment, or even the click and shush of chalk against a chalkboard, give me an almost visceral sensation of pleasure. This can be a great motivator if you still tend to write rough drafts in ink.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  48. theloniousmonkfish

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    Man, I returned to school for some classes a few years ago and when I turned in my first paper it was an issue. It was legible, the required pages and more, on time, and done with pen and paper. Outside of printing papers to turn in all work, tests, everything was done online. Bought a laptop and used peoples printers, struggled through but did well. Being a throwback is hard.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  49. drwatson

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    Like, who's still using cursive on the regular, though?

    People outside the valley!

    John
    Posted 2 years ago #
  50. woodsroad

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    Anyone on this forum who's received anything from me can attest that my handwriting just sucks. I do my best, and almost always include a hand-written note with anything that I send out, but the lack of practice (due to computers) has rendered my once nice penmanship awful. Yes, I was rather appalled to find out that my daughter wasn't being taught cursive. But then I thought (to quote a great statesperson who didn't give a flying fuck duck), "what difference does it make?". How is my daughter's time best spent? Learning cursive, I'm sorry to say, is way down list.

    But I still believe that proofreading is time very well spent.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  51. sablebrush52

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    Only the ill-bred and lazy have stopped hand writing thank you notes.

    Well, there ARE people like moi who are just rude.

    I do appreciate a well written post, one that expresses interesting ideas cogently and with style. Anyone know where I can find that?

    See? Rude.

    It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt. - Mark Twain

    It is pointless to argue with a fanatic since a dim bulb can't be converted into a searchlight. - Jesse Silver
    Posted 2 years ago #
  52. woodsroad

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    I do appreciate a well written post, one that expresses interesting ideas cogently and with style. Anyone know where I can find that?

    Thursday would be good but I'm not sure if it will be ready by then so if you want to move that thing over to the birthing center then I'll set it to 7 and wash the potatoes in the morning. Is that OK? BTW, the squirrels still think your car is purple!

    Posted 2 years ago #
  53. sablebrush52

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    Thursday would be good but I'm not sure if it will be ready by then so if you want to move that thing over to the birthing center then I'll set it to 7 and wash the potatoes in the morning. Is that OK? BTW, the squirrels still think your car is purple!

    I want what you're smoking.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  54. sablebrush52

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    Think of your handwriting as putting on paper a picture of the way you think.

    I'm so screwed. All my doctors write illegibly. My handwriting is illegal in 38 states.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  55. ashdigger

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    My scrawl is to handwriting what a stick figure is to Monet.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  56. didimauw

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    In a class I took once, they proved the human mind has no trouble decoding sentences, where the letters in the words are jumbled.

    But the lack of the Damn shift key makes it difficult for people to read???

    Good thing my phone auto capitalizes things... Sheesh

    "I don't know half of you half as well as I should like, and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve."
    Posted 2 years ago #
  57. brian64

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    But then I thought (to quote a great statesperson who didn't give a flying fuck duck), "what difference does it make?".

    “Bipartisan usually means some larger-than-usual deception is being carried out.” – George Carlin
    Posted 2 years ago #
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    hextor

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    I do most of my typing on my phone, one thing that makes me "RAGE" is my big fat thumbs, I will type something fast and send it and people will get my messages with all kinds of misspellings and thus I will get the following messages from my arshole friends " dude, go back to school" " did you ever take English classes?" I do love writing short stories though, and I rather write my rough drafts on paper, and yes I do think that cursive is a thing of the past, although I do remember in high school I did melt some girls heart by writing a poem in their Valentines card in cursive.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  59. chasingembers

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    That cursive is no longer taught in schools is just a myth.

    Nope, cursive is no longer taught in Central KY elementary schools. Sad times. A nicely written script is just a pleasant thing to see.

    Damnation seize my soul if I give you quarters, or take any from you.
    -Edward Teach
    Posted 2 years ago #
  60. cosmicfolklore

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    The only people I have ever known who held on to a great handwriting have always been girls. I don't think I have ever seen a man's writing that was what one might call pleasant to the eyes. After years of copying the homework of the nearest girl setting on the bus on my way to school, I can say that I always appreciated their neat script. Now, that sounds like a broad generalization, sure, sure, but it is one founded on my experience. I don't think I have ever met a man who had neat handwriting, you know, making proper capital S's. Q's. and G's in cursive. Most men tend to just fill in the harder to write cursive letters with whatever symbol makes sense to them at the time.

    That's just my view of it from my spot on the planet.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  61. cosmicfolklore

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    Reading and writing has always seemed like magic to me... I open a book and run my eyes across these picto-symbols that represent sounds, formed into words that represent ideas, that come together to form worlds, people, actions, events, ideas... and as my eyes quickly scan pages faster and faster, the process becomes like being transported into other places, times, people... I've tried to listen to audiobooks, but nothing puts you in the active process of mind-melding with the author like actually reading. Listening is passive, while reading is active.

    Writing is like the same. When in the first phases of writing, just putting the ideas down and building a world brick by brick, spelling, rules, and everything fades away, and your brain is connected to the paper in the typewriter, or the scratches of a #2 on paper, or :::sigh::: the screen of a monitor. Then I am always amazed at how close to following all of the rules of spelling and grammar I have followed in writing the story. But, of course, the art is in the editing.

    Magic! Art, music, movies, all have their own sort of magic, but reading and writing always strikes me as the closest to classical wizardry that one can come to... symbols with power, spells, incantations, the faster you read the more real the illusion becomes, and then the author is actually whispering in your ear, you are actually in the room... on a different world... with real people, some you trust more than others, and... well... it's magic!

    Posted 2 years ago #
  62. lostandfound

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    Trivial? Hardly! The inability to present a thought is sad. A reflection on the poster, his teachers and his parents.
    An unwillingness to take the time to post a literate message, to me, exhibits a disdain for the other members which also reflects poorly on the writer, parents and educators. There is also the image a self-centered individual who over values his importance and his message, expecting the readers to spend time decoding the message. My time is too valuable for that.

    We're all born with varying degrees of capability, Warren. Some are profoundly capable. Everything they touch turns to gold. Some are vastly incapable, everything they touch turns to, well... Shit. Most of us fall somewhere in between. Some of us have great literary skills, and some of us excel in maths. Some of us, try as we might, just can't figure 2 + 2, and others will never understand the difference between there, they're, and their. I can hardly judge a man based on his abilities and inabilities. Willingness, and unwillingness- suggest maybe a more deeply rooted psychological or emotional "issue". Again, not something I'm willing to base another human beings merits on. I've seldom walked in another man's shoes, after all.

    If you want to talk about exhibitions, and images, and presuppositions about others' expectations- it's in my opinion that those are all self-created images, and have nothing to do with actual reality, more than likely.

    Back to my original point: I too, value my time, as does every other living being. I value it so much in fact, that after realizing- at the tender age of twenty-seven, I too was turning into a curmudgeon, I decided that (for myself, anyway)- spending the rest of my years in a miserly state would be a waste, and a grievance upon the life I'm so fortunate to be able to experience.

    I now choose to not pick out the faults in others, experience joy as my default state, and give thanks for every single micro and macroscopic blessing, that has been bestowed upon me.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  63. northernneil

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    @ lostandfound. Very well said! I could not agree with you more

    Posted 2 years ago #
  64. toobfreak

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    I took ceon in a class they had no trouble decoding the human mind, proved sentences where words are the letters in the jumbled but for the lack of difficult people makes it read the key to shift??? Damn.

    Sheesh... Good thing my auto things capitalizes phone.

    Spelling, syntax and grammar may not be an absolute necessity in every occurrence, but as tools of convention, they sure do make it a lot easier to get our points across more clearly, and more basically, show as equal a respect to the reader that the writer no doubt hopes for himself.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  65. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

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    Do you guys know why we call upper-case, "upper-case" and lower-case, "lower-case"?

    When the printing press was invented, they had no rules of punctuation, nor capitalization. The only rule was the first letter had to be BIG, the rest of the letters were small. That was it, no other grammar, spelling, nor capitalization. But, there were less Big letters for the printing press, so they were all in a smaller box, because you only need one per page. So, they stored those letters on the shelf above the press. Thus, it became known as the Upper-case letters.
    There had to be multiple letters of the smaller ones, so the box for them was huge, and could only be stored beneath the press. Thus, lower-case.
    No lie

    Posted 2 years ago #
  66. toobfreak

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    I just looked that up and damn, Cosmic, you are absolutely correct. Much of our language is replete with all kinds of carry-overs from an earlier time. The time will come when books, magazines and printing presses will be largely a thing of the past, more of a historical thing rather than viable business anymore, and like so many other things like drive-ins, that will make me sad to see another part of my world pass on into history.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  67. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

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    Oh, and the letters are arranged on a keyboard in the manner that it is, so that salesmen could easily type out the word "typewriter" on the first line with one-hand. Think of that. In stead of using alphabetical order, that hodge-podge of letters is arranged that way to better sell something that is no longer even used.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  68. kane

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    My preferred method is to use my manual typewriter. Used to be all long hand, but years ago went to the typewriter. It's heavy and slow, requires me to sit still, and lets me see the page better than long hand does. I like the sensory experience of typing on a typewriter. Any other typewriter fans here? Text and email for practicality, word processing for final draft. But for writing, it's typewriter or long hand. I think a legal pad and pencil or pen has got to be the most liberating and freest way to go. I think people who have grown up only using computers and phones should acclimate themselves to paper and pencil to see how it will change their writing if they care about these things.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  69. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

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    I still have a typewriter, but I've always hated it. I'm a yellow legal pad and #2 pencil kinda guy. But, my handwriting is aweful. I've broken my hand six times while boxing, and I think of my handwriting as a sort of secret code that only I can read.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  70. downinit

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    claims that the qwerty layout was made to let salesmen impress customers by pecking out the brand name "TYPE WRITER QUOTE" from one keyboard row are not formally substantiated.
    Koichi and Motoko Yasuoka: On the Prehistory of QWERTY

    Posted 2 years ago #

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