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Question For Retirees

(27 posts)
  • Started 1 year ago by mothernature
  • Latest reply from oldmojo
  1. mothernaturewilleatusallforbreakfast

    mothernature

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    For those of you who are lucky enough to have reached retirement, how has you pipe smoking changed since retiring? Do you enjoy it more? Do you smoke more?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  2. tbradsim1

    tbradsim1

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    Yep.

    The Old Cajun
    Posted 1 year ago #
  3. cortezattic

    Cortez

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    I start my day with my pipe, a fresh pot of coffee, and the newspaper. After that I have a leisurely breakfast, followed by another bowl of tobacco. Then I guess I have 5 or 6 more bowls throughout the rest of the day. In retirement my biggest decisions are what pipes to use with which tobaccos. Retirement is good. I hope everybody has a chance to experience it.

    I find myself sitting idly on the line dividing past and future,
    as if I could kill time without injuring eternity. -- Thoreau
    Posted 1 year ago #
  4. mso489

    mso489

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    I was always busy at work and had a lot going on, and a busy life otherwise. Retirement only picked up the pace. Partly, my wife's health and mobility problems caused lots of needed tasks and activities. But even otherwise, I think having more options and planning for each day just made life even more busy. On a job, I had many things on automatic pilot part of the time. I could move from task to task in a dependable way. This is more varied and demanding usually. Pipewise, I don't smoke a lot more, nor do I have more time to smoke, but I have taken more interest in it, and it has been good to smooth the rough spots and have an excuse to sit down and check in with myself and get in touch with my own thoughts. I smoke about the same, but I rely on it somewhat more.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  5. warren

    warren

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    I couldn't possibly smoke more nor, enjoy it more than when I worked at my career. I've been retired from my career since 1986. Now I can work at what I like and make as little or as much money as I wish.

    When I had a career, smoking was still socially permissible in the office and my G-ride. So, nothing changed in that respect. I'm actually smoking less as it is no longer permitted on planes, in rental cars, restaurants, hotels, etc. So, I'm saving a bit of money also. My self-employment operation permits me to spend most of my time out of doors, when not traveling, where smoking is, for the most part, permitted.

    I enjoy smoking as much now as I did then or I'd quit my wee vice and save a few thousand a year. It is an expensive exercise.

    A man without a shillelagh is a man without an expedient.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  6. tuold

    tuold

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    I actually smoke less than when I was working because now I don't have to cram my recreation time between work and other responsibilities. the pipes are always there whenever I feel like a special moment. In fact, right now seems like a good time.

    The pipe is an instrument of civilization.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  7. ray47

    ray47

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    Not only has my pipe smoking increased since I retired in 2009, but also my pipe & tobacco purchasing. I guess I have more time now to window shop.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  8. cossackjack

    cossackjack

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    Retired April 1, 2014. Never looked back. Have not worn a watch or tie since then (except at #1 son's wedding).
    More time for chores & smoking, exclusively outside.
    More time to rehabilitate estate pipes for personal use or resale; less PAD (though if I sell enough of the stable, I could buy a few higher-end burners).
    Less frequent TAD, though still filling-out the cellar.
    Overall expenditures, including TAD & PAD, greatly curtailed.

    "A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.
    Specialization is for insects!" - Robert Heinlein
    Posted 1 year ago #
  9. puffy

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    I worked for one of the so called big three auto companies In 1994 I got 30 years in I was 52 years old.They wanted to reduce their number of workers.They told me that if I would retire they would pay my pension and social security until I was 62.I grabbed it.I could smoke at work so I probably smoke about the same know as then.I made sure that I had plenty of pipes before I retired so now I only have to concern myself with tobacco.The not so good thing is that in the 23 years that I've been retired the price of that tobacco in some cases has more than doubled..Retirement is great I highly recommend it to anyone who is thinking about it.

    Life's most valuable treasure is..Love
    Posted 1 year ago #
  10. gloucesterman

    gloucesterman

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    I don't think I smoke more or less but the pace of life has certainly changed and because of that reduction in "to do" responsibilities I am relaxed and enjoy it more. I wake some mornings not sure what day it is and go to bed those nights not having bothered to find out. It just doesn't matter anymore, every day is a holiday!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  11. didache

    didache

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    I retire on Jan 31st next year .. so only 5 months to go! I am already getting demob happy, as we say in the UK.

    As I smoke at home, I don't actually foresee much change in my smoking habits. I have a little stash put away (approaching 18 months worth on current consumption) so I am content.

    Mike

    "Pipe-smokers spend so much time cleaning, filling and fooling with their pipes, they don't have time to get into mischief." - Bill Vaughan
    Posted 1 year ago #
  12. User has not uploaded an avatar

    instymp

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    Yes, because I can. & getting lazy too.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  13. newbroom

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    I've been retired for 4 yrs due to health and age. I retired a yr before my maximum SS benefits would be in effect, at the age of 65, a non smoker.
    I had had a love/hate relationship with tobacco since I was 12 or 13.
    For most of my smoking 'life' I've smoked non filters, and RYO.
    About a yr into retirement, I really hit bottom physically and emotionally and went back to smoking. Within a few months I'd become tired of not being happy with what was almost a necessary evil, once again.
    I had always thought that inhaling the burnt paper was not something that enhanced the experience and it DAWNED on me to try smoking my RYO from a corn cob. This worked for a month or so, maybe less, and I found this website.
    Amen.
    My most recent 'discovery' is so obvious as to be embarrassing.
    I smoke mostly indoor, and with the windows closed. I have been changing the a/c filters monthly, but the air still seemed smoky and after 3 yrs, I bought a large room air cleaner! My air has been much cleaner as a result.
    So, my pipe smoking actually began after I retired.
    My health has improved and I enjoy smoking a variety of tobaccos and pipes.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  14. cosmicbobo

    David

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    Mine has been off and on all my life. 4 pack a day Pall Mall for some years. Then it was 20 cigars and a lot of chaw. Pipe smoking mixed in between. Had not seriously smoked since 95 when I woke up in a Tunica Casino Hotel, hungover with cigar smoke all over my insides and outsides. Picked up some months ago as my pain meds don't work that well. Pipe smoking makes me forget it, and the nic hit actually does help with the pain. So, I smoke early, often (until the wife hits me with the spatula), and with my MD's blessing.

    Be that as it may, it probably never was...
    Posted 1 year ago #
  15. newbroom

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    We don't mention the word often enough, because it seems to be so generalized but STRESS is a killer and for many of us, pipes and tobacco, together, help us ward off its ravages.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  16. cosmicbobo

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    Yes, you nailed it. Why should we be stressed when we're retired? Oh, we get some bill on a Friday after hours that Medicare didn't pay and our balls are frosted until Monday when we can speak to someone. The little inanities of life pile up at this stage, so a good bowl of gruel for the tummy and a bowl of tobacco for the soul seems to help.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  17. pappymac

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    I tried retirement once after 21 years in the military. Found I'd much rather be able to pay my bills, buy what I want when I want, and eat and drink when I want. Now, 24 years later, I work for myself at home and pretty much smoke my pipe when I want to smoke my pipe. I will turn 65 in January but plan to continue working until I can draw my full Social Security allowance without being penalized for working.

    It helps that I work at home on my computer and make as much working 28-30 hours a week as I did when I was working 60-80 hours a week.

    I am glad we have a good admin and responsible moderators.

    Heave to you dark colored ship under sail! Prepare to be boarded!
    Posted 1 year ago #
  18. papipeguy

    papipeguy

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    Oh, yes. The best thing about retirement is doing nothing, however, it turns out that you're never done doing nothing. It's a first world problem but I deal with it.

    Blowin' smoke since 1970.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  19. mcitinner1

    mcitinner1

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    OOOH YEAAAH... Stress was a huge part of my job, and though I miss the guys I worked with... I don't miss the job at all. I can sleep if I want to now.

    Stan
    Godfrey Daniels!!
    The Plenipotent Key to Cope's Correct Card of the Peerless Pilgrimage to Saint Nicotine of the Holy Herb:
    Posted 1 year ago #
  20. zitotczito

    zitotczito

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    Been retired since 05/2016 and have not looked back. I miss some of the people I worked with but like mcitinner1 I don't miss the job. Time does seem to pass quickly and I seem to be very busy not doing anything.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  21. prndl

    prndl

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    It's hard to be ill at the world when every day you live inside that world seems like Saturday morning. I don't know that I smoke any more or any less these days but, I sure seem to have more time in which to enjoy it.

    Home is the sailor, home from sea,
    And the hunter home from the hill.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  22. brass

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    I'm not working due to some past medical problems and age discrimination. Looks like I'll be forced to retire on Social Security at the end of the month so that I can pay bills.

    I was forced to sell my kayak and my Hobie ProAngler because I couldn't be sure I could get back in if I fell out - not an unlikely event due to balance problems.

    So I don't work and I don't fish - the activities that consumed 80% plus of my time. Not having activities to keep me busy is literally driving me crazy. I'm going to look into a volunteer or part-time job with a worthy organization or maybe take some courses.

    The pipe is one of the sole solaces I have of my old life - that and my Church.

    Pax

    Posted 1 year ago #
  23. didache

    didache

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    People from the US are mentioning Social Security here. Is that much the same as what we in the UK would call the 'State Pension'? Over here you pay 'national insurance' throughout your working life and, when you are 65 (if you are a man) you get a pension. It isn't a huge amount and most people these days have an occupational pension as well. The current rate (assuming you have a pretty well uninterrupted employment history) is £122.30 per week (about $156).

    Mike

    Posted 1 year ago #
  24. brass

    brass

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    Same concept. In the U.S., the amount you draw depends to a certain degree on how much you contribute. I would get about $2400 monthly if I retired at 65. $1950 if I retire at 63.

    Pax

    Posted 1 year ago #
  25. didache

    didache

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    Thanks Pax

    Sounds sort of similar. Over here the national insurance is a percentage of wages (like tax) but the rate of pension is the same no matter who you are. You do, however, need to have 38 years paying into it or you wind up with a reduced rate. This is why almost everyone has an occupational pension as well. It would be very hard to live on the state pension alone but if it is regarded as a 'top up' then people can live comfortably.

    Mike

    Posted 1 year ago #
  26. paulie66scandinavian

    Paul

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    Didache, same scheme here
    as far as to ex military in retirement,often it goes the way that NCO (Up to Sergeant majors)many of those will continue to work part time in civile sector but when it comes to higher ranks, they seldom seem working after resignement/& retirement perhaps due to their higher pensions,

    Paul The Scandinavian'
    Posted 1 year ago #
  27. oldmojo

    oldmojo

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    I retired in 2010. I wasn't smoking pipes then (cigars). I switched to pipes because I can have all of the paraphernalia at hand at home. I much prefer pipes to cigars. My morning routine starts with coffee, London Mixture and TV news, followed by a scan of favorite internet sites with another pipe, usually a VaPer or a Balkan. Much of my day is normally spent in my workshop, where I can take a smoke break whenever I like. I get SS and a small pension. It is enough to pay bills and allows me a few occasional luxuries like a bottle of Single Malt or taking my wife out to dinner. I don't miss going to an office every day.

    Posted 1 year ago #

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