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Pronunciation of Pipe-things

(40 posts)
  • Started 1 month ago by odobenus
  • Latest reply from Bill Nichols
  1. odobenus

    odobenus

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    I was re-listening to the two excellent interviews with Ken Barnes on the Pipes Magazine podcast and noted that Ken pronounces 'Sasieni' as 'Sah-seeny.' Somehow the correct pronunciation sailed past my impenetrable ignorance until now. I wonder how many of you kindly folks out there joined me in saying 'Sah-see-enny.' I'm going to try it like Ken from now on.

    Sidenote: Ken also keeps saying 'Chair-atan' and Brian persists in pronouncing it like the hotel chain. Sometimes, I guess, it takes us a while to hear things right.

    Thirdnote: I went down a true internet rabbit-hole about how to pronounce 'Latakia' a few months ago and came to the somewhat gratifying conclusion that there's no right way: Unless you speak the particular dialect of that region of Syria, it's a safe bet you're saying it wrong. Though apparently 'Lat-uh-KEE-uh' is a hell of a lot closer than the BBC's official 'Luh-TAK-ee-uh.'

    Non Serviam
    Posted 1 month ago #
  2. homeatsea

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    The two I've just accepted I likely won't get right are latakia and cavendish.

    -Home At Sea
    Posted 1 month ago #
  3. olkofri

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    Lah-TAH-kee-ah.

    OHM PAH-ool.

    Not the sweet, new grass with flowers is this harvesting of mine;
    Not the upland clover bloom...
    Posted 1 month ago #
  4. daniel7

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    You don't need to pronounce Oom Paul, just say Hungarian instead.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  5. mikethompson

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    Lata-kia, just like Russ says in his videos. If its good enough for him its good enough for me.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  6. warren

    warren

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    I know an "Oom Paul" when I see one. I have no idea what a "Hungarian" is. Is this now the "politically correct" name? Goodness gracious me!

    A man without a shillelagh is a man without an expedient.
    Posted 1 month ago #
  7. mso489

    mso489

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    I wouldn't feel particularly out-of-the-loop. Most of us are exposed to this language in writing, so unless we discuss it with someone more knowledgeable, we do the best we can, and there are many differences even between correct pronunciations between English speaking countries. In the U.S., now many people are using Spanish pronunciations when speaking English, both because they are proud of knowing Spanish and because they feel it is truer to what they are saying, though I think it is somewhat optional at this point. Language is ever-changing. Shakespeare was a blanking genius and his plays are all his or hers or whoever's, but part of the stimulus, as students of the plays have long contended, was that he was writing and performing as an actor in a time when English was evolving quickly so puns and images just lept from common speech.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  8. chilllucky

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    In the UK, they call it lah-TAH-keeya. Drove me up the bloody bothy wall, it did.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  9. bnichols23

    Bill Nichols

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    They also pronounce "van Gogh" as "van goff," so go figure....

    Head Black Frigate keelhauler, boss powder monkey, & troublemaker 1st class.
    Posted 1 month ago #
  10. cortezattic

    Cortez

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    Ouellette.

    I find myself sitting idly on the line dividing past and future,
    as if I could kill time without injuring eternity. -- Thoreau
    Posted 1 month ago #
  11. railman

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    There’s been a few pipemaker’s names that surprised me how they are supposed to be pronounced as opposed to how I imagined them to be pronounced.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  12. daniel7

    daniel7

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    I know an "Oom Paul" when I see one. I have no idea what a "Hungarian" is. Is this now the "politically correct" name? Goodness gracious me!

    That pipe shape was invented/started to produce in Debrecen, Hungary in the XVIII. century from meer, clay and hardwood.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  13. mso489

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    We (US) say aluminum and the Brits say aluminium. We say schedule as skedual, but the Brits say shedual. The English "got there" first, but the US people remade the language in their own image. So it goes. Many languages get so changed by demographic groups that it is not understandable to other demographic groups despite having the same linguistic basis. The Chinese essentially speak different languages -- Cantonese, Mandarian, but others too. Many English actors do impeccable American speech when needed. Northerners in the U.S. have long imitated Southern speech, but a sailor from Rome, Georgia, on my ship in the Navy, did a wonderful imitation of Yankee speech, with a really good ear, hitting those consonants hard and doing the vowels in a totally Northern way. Good ear. Great to hear. I grew up with the old man of Chicago politics, Richard J. Daley, who was unquestionably Irish on both sides. For years I puzzled over why his speech had zero Irish lilt or brogue at all. I finally decided that he had grown up in a blue collar neighborhood, where he continued to live all his adult life, and I hypothesize that he lived around a lot of Polish people, so that's the way he spoke. The Irish "sing" their English. The Polish more chew it, as Mayor Daley did.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  14. odobenus

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    I was surprised, even though I should've known better, by the proper pronunciation of Jess Chonowitsch.
    Also I would've thought Eltang would be pronounced 'el-tong' like S. Bang is 'Bong' but Brian Levine and others say it like the orange astro-powder.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TWghCdIqedA

    Posted 1 month ago #
  15. didimauw

    didimauw

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    That's interesting. I'm sure I screw up a lot of pronunciations of pipe related things.

    When I think of some I'll post it

    "I don't know half of you half as well as I should like, and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve."
    Posted 1 month ago #
  16. ashdigger

    ashdigger

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    I'm still trying to pronounce Pro-nun-see-aye-get the fuck away from me (shun).

    Ubi Ignis Est?
    Posted 1 month ago #
  17. scloyd

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    I have one Chacom pipe. I say Sha-comb. Right or wrong?

    How do you pronounce Butz-Choquin? Butts or Boots? Sho-kin, sho-keen, sho-coin? Or something completely different?

    Posted 1 month ago #
  18. olkofri

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    FOW-ehn.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  19. mortonbriar

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    I had friends go through Syria a few years ago now, (before the chaos) and they stayed a night or two in Latakia. I asked him about the pronunciation and he insisted it was
    'la TAR kia', as opposed to the youtube 'lata KIA'. I just wish I had of asked him to take note before he went on the trip rather than after so I could be sure...

    Do we have any Syrian pipe smokers on the forum? I really would like some finality to this one...

    Isaac

    I don't really care if the cup is half full or half empty, I just want something to sip on.
    Posted 1 month ago #
  20. chilipalmer

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    What about the Lovat? Is it pronounced "love-it," "la-vat," or some other way?

    I have a Rattray 56 Lovat that I am rather fond of and keep around in honor of Simon Fraser, 15th Lord Lovat.

    Cheers,

    Chili

    “Pipe: a primary masculine symbol with authoritarian overtones but also indicative of reliability and contentment.”
    -The Dictionary of Visual Language, 1980
    Posted 1 month ago #
  21. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    I have one Chacom pipe. I say Sha-comb. Right or wrong?

    Kee-rect.

    How do you pronounce Butz-Choquin? Butts or Boots? Sho-kin, sho-keen, sho-coin? Or something completely different?

    Boots Sho-kwa. The n is silent, or nearly so! The a is neither our short nor long "a", but more like the sound we make when being luke warm to a subject.

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    Posted 1 month ago #
  22. bnichols23

    Bill Nichols

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    the orange astro-powder.

    Doesn't matter -- the stuff's nasty how*ever* you pronounce it. Tastes like soap!!

    What about the Lovat? Is it pronounced "love-it," "la-vat," or some other way?

    Chili, I've always pronounced that the way Peter Lawford did in the Longest Day: "love-it" I could easily be wrong, but frankly to me it just sounds a HECK of a lot classier that way. I figure that since Lawford was British & was playing Lord Lovat, if he didn't know how to pronounce it nobody did.

    Bill

    Posted 1 month ago #
  23. scloyd

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    Thanks jp. Much appreciated.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  24. tulsagentleman

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    As mso489 stated, many of us encounter words while reading and assume a pronunciation that fits our own sensibilities. When I was a kid growing up in a small town in Oklahoma my mother had a number of classical records which I enjoyed very much. Most folks in that town equated "classical" music with Hank Williams and The Carter Family. I decided that Chopin was probably pronounced "chop'-in" and when later we had access to a classical music station I wondered who this "Show'-pan" fellow was until I finally figured out it was the same guy. As long as we know what we're talking about I don't suppose it makes all that much difference.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  25. chilipalmer

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    Chili, I've always pronounced that the way Peter Lawford did in the Longest Day: "love-it" I could easily be wrong, but frankly to me it just sounds a HECK of a lot classier that way. I figure that since Lawford was British & was playing Lord Lovat, if he didn't know how to pronounce it nobody did. [:)]

    Bill,

    We are on the same page!

    Cheers,

    Chili

    Posted 1 month ago #
  26. craiginthecorn

    craiginthecorn

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    Latakia

    Arabic speakers almost always put the accent on the second syllable.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  27. bnichols23

    Bill Nichols

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    Bill,

    We are on the same page! [:D]

    Watched that sucker again last night. Just easier to tune to Turner than go dig out the DVD. Burton's scene about the missing pilot being in the bottom of the English channel is perfect stone-faced Brit.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  28. yaddy306

    yaddy306

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    Dictionary.com, Merriam Webster online and Collins online all agree that latakia is pronounced with an emphasis on the "KEE" syllable. I think in Arabic this emphasis is less pronounced, but I haven't seen anywhere that emphasizes the "TACK" syllable.

    https://www.dictionary.com/browse/latakia

    https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/latakia

    https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/latakia

    For Butz Choquin, the "Choquin" part is pronounced "show KAY", not "sho kwa".

    Posted 1 month ago #
  29. didimauw

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    Well even the word pipe.

    It's pronounced "pip" and everyone knows it. But it just looks like it should be pronounced "peyep"

    But whoever says it like that is a true oddball.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  30. yaddy306

    yaddy306

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    Correction: "Choquin" is more like halfway between "show kay" and "show ken" but with a silent "n", with equal emphasis of the two syllables.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  31. bnichols23

    Bill Nichols

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    Right. Roughly "show-kanh," with a short a, at least if it follows standard French pronunciation rules, which it might not.

    B

    Posted 1 month ago #
  32. didimauw

    didimauw

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    Esoterica

    I used to for years in my head call it Esterotica.

    Till I phonetically said it out loud one day.

    Mind blowing.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  33. elbert

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    There's a video series on YouTube of Brian Cox, a well known Scot, drinking and pronouncing the names of various whisky malts and blends. Clearly there's room for that sort of thing in the world of pipes and tobacco.

    "An thou hast them, smoketh them!" -An Old Philosopher
    Posted 1 month ago #
  34. crashthegrey

    crashthegrey

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    That's some odd erotica didi.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  35. brian64

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    It's esoteric erotica. Or maybe erotically esoteric.

    “Bipartisan usually means some larger-than-usual deception is being carried out.” – George Carlin
    Posted 1 month ago #
  36. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    Sho-kwa. The n is silent, or nearly so! The a is neither our short nor long "a", but more like the sound we make when being luke warm to a subject.

    Eh, now I am not sure that there's a slight "w" sound in the last syllable, but want to make clear the "a" sound is not a long nor a short a in American English. More like the a in "can".

    Posted 1 month ago #
  37. mso489

    mso489

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    I'm always intrigued with the famous Duke University basketball coach's pronunciation of his name versus the spelling -- you know who i mean, and I can't spell it. But he is Polish by heritage, and it is pronounced as if it began with an Sh..., but is spelled starting with a Krzy ... (do I have it right?), just no English phonetics in play at all. My joke is, my name is Tom, R-A-L-P-H. I guess if I doggedly insisted, many would comply.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  38. scloyd

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    Boots Sho-caa (Caa as in Caan, James Caan). That's what I'm going with or BC.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  39. prndl

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    Just goes to show.

    The boychildgrand calls it "butts chokin'".

    Home is the sailor, home from sea,
    And the hunter home from the hill.
    Posted 1 month ago #
  40. bnichols23

    Bill Nichols

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    Boygrandchild showing his @$$, huh?

    Posted 1 month ago #

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