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Polishing Compound Question

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    turtlewoman

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    I'm sure someone here will know the answer to this. I am wanting to use my dremel with a buffing wheel to clean up some estate pipes I got. I heard on You Tube the name of the compound that you're supposed to use. It was something like "white diamond" or something like that. I can't remember which video I was watching so I can't go back and find it. Your help will be greatly appreciated.
    Kate

    Posted 1 year ago #
  2. captainsousie

    captainsousie

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    I personally wouldn't use the Dremel because the RPM, combined with the wheel size, creates too fast of a surface speed. To answer your question, the 2 main buffing compounds are Tripoli and White Diamond.

    Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines.
    Posted 1 year ago #
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    turtlewoman

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    Wow, Captainsousie, thanks for the quick response. I was worried a little about using the dremel. I might have to invest in a bench setup if it's not too expensive.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  4. captainsousie

    captainsousie

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    No prob. I currently run a corded drill with a home-brewed 6-8" wheel setup but if you want something better, you could go with an 8" Beall buffing system and a 1725RPM buffing motor. Alternately, if you're a bit nutty, you could go with a full bench grinder with 4" wheels but that's not recommended either. Hopefully somebody like Al will chime in with more/better info.

    Best of luck with your system. I love mine.

    EDIT: I keep my drill stable in a small bench vise and control the briar instead of putting the pipe in a vise and controlling the drill.

    Posted 1 year ago #
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    Anonymous

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    I have been wondering the same thing I just recently purchased a Dremel in hopes of making new pipe for myself like the old days when I spent all my time in my friends dad's garage.I cant find a pic of the cool pipe I made gonna do some digging. EDIT- Found the pic - here it is

    Posted 1 year ago #
  6. thuber88

    thuber88

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    I have a variable speed dremel, but at is slowest its 5000 rpm, you would burn the wood easily I would think.

    I will probably get a grinder for polishing and work on pipes in the future, but it will be a 1700 rpm one

    Posted 1 year ago #
  7. mlyvers

    mlyvers

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    carnuba wax is used as the final step in polishing your pipes and stems. i currently use a ryobi grinder that i converted to a buffer. it is 3600 rpm. i like using white diamond 1st, then apply carnuba 2nd. be careful with the hi rpms on your drummel tool. good luck.

    mike.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  8. yadan

    yadan

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    What about using Liquid Gold to clean before applying the Carnuba?

    "I'm always easy to please since I'm always satisfied with the very best." - Oscar Wilde
    Posted 1 year ago #
  9. piperl12

    piperl12

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    Cheaper than a buffer and better than a grinder is an old washing machine motor. Mount it on a plywood base add a shaft extension and some pillow blocks if you want more than one buffer going at the same time so you don't have to switch it out. If you can get the motor for under $20.00 at a used appliance store the whole thing can be purchased for the price of a good grinder and is significantly better.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  10. timely

    timely

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    Paragon Wax for smooth finish pipes and HalyconII Wax for rusticated or rough surface pipe, all done by hand.

    Posted 1 year ago #
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    turtlewoman

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    Ok. So, I couldn't stand wondering and being a hardheaded female I had to find out about the dremel for myself. My dremel is variable speed. I put it at the lowest rpm, used some polishing compound and a pipe that's beyond saving anyway--gouged out bowl, crack in the shank, chip out of the stem--a certifiable throwaway that came with a humidor I got on Ebay. You all were right. It didn't work very well. But what it did make me do was start looking for a bench grinder/buffer. They have one at Harbor Freight that seems like it would do the job for not too much money. Piperl12, I'm not very mechanical so I don't think I better go fooling around with motors but the washing machine motor idea sounds like a good one.
    Thanks for all the input, guys. Maybe someday I'll learn to take good advice when it's given.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  12. ssjones

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    If you get the Harbor freight buffer, get the variable speed reducer plug-in. The buffer is probably 3250 RPM's which is a bit too fast but with the speed reducer, you can make it work. (I think the speed reducer was $20)

    Al

    Posted 1 year ago #
  13. allan

    allan

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    I am a jeweler and have a giant polishing machine/vacuum setup that's great for handling precious metals which rely on heat to literally 'move' the metal. That means that together with the compounds, the speed of the wheel and the technique make jewelry shine.

    With pipes I found out that different techniques must apply. My machine runs at 3450 rpm and i typically use 5 to 6 inch wheels-extremely high speed and lots of heat.

    My first attempts were to handle it like jewelery--a no no. I burnt the stems and did nothing good to the bowls.

    I had to alter my techniques to first, apply the polish to the wheel (sparingly while its running) and just lightly move the pipe to the wheel. Much better results. Not to make this a whole lesson, the polish and pipe are applied at the lower third of the wheel while its rotating, NOT THE UPPER TWO THIRDS. DANGER! The pipe can easily be ripped from your hands, and one should always wear eye protection!

    For those without these machines, the above suggestions of low speed motors and 4 or 5 inch wheels with gentle pressure should give good results. Polishes can include: Tripoli for deeper but fine scratches (meaning no gouges, in which sandpaper of different grits would be used first); If there aren't any deep scratches, i would go straight to white diamond followed by carnauba wax, hopefully each on separate wheels, cleaning the pipe inbetween each step as to not transfer one media to the other one.

    Allan

    Allan
    Posted 1 year ago #
  14. ssjones

    ssjones

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    That is interesting Allan on how most of the buffing techniques are pretty universal. I learned to buff on large metal motorcycle parts (stainless steel & aluminum).

    Posted 1 year ago #
  15. allan

    allan

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    Al

    You are so right. Metal polishing techniques are pretty much the same whatever metals you are working on

    Allan

    Posted 1 year ago #
  16. rlunderhill

    rlunderhill

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    paragon wax with my fingers. I let it dry and then buff it with a soft cloth. Obsidian oil for the stem. I use my fingers to apply, let it set for 30 minutes and wipe clean.

    I do this once a month. No power tools.

    Posted 1 year ago #
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    Anonymous

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    Something I would definitely stay away from (I learned this the hard way decades ago) is not to use any wood polishes, waxes or cleaners, even those made specifically for wood finishes and labeled as "gentle" and/or "mild."

    When the pipe warms while smoking, that lemon scent, or whatever other chemicals they use in that stuff stinks like hell. Those waxes -- carnauba for smooth pipes, Halcyon 2 for rusticated/blasted pipes -- work, I'm just not big on waxes myself. I just use a pipe cloth once in a while -- Dunhill, Stanwell, Denicare any of those suits me fine.

    Posted 1 year ago #

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