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Pipe Bowl Pre-Carbonization....Love It? Hate It?

(21 posts)
  • Started 5 months ago by carolinachurchwarden
  • Latest reply from enrikon
  1. carolinachurchwarden

    carolinachurchwarden

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    I'm not really loving a pre-carbonized bowl. The first pipe I carved had no pre-carbonization. The kit pipe I carved didn't have it either. Sure, they burned a little as they developed the char, but the pre-carbonization has an even worse taste as it's smoked. I feel like I have to smoke something cheap in it to get it broken in since it just makes everything taste bad.

    My Color Duke had it, but about half has peeled away by now. My new Kaywoodie has it, but I'm unsure how long it will take to either taste better or start peeling out like the Color Duke.

    Anyone have any thoughts on it? Love it? Hate it? Don't care? What say you?

    "If you can't send money, send tobacco." - George Washington

    Posted 5 months ago #
  2. ashdigger

    ashdigger

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    I'm not a fan. If given the option...NO. if it comes that way...no big deal though.

    Ubi Ignis Est?
    Posted 5 months ago #
  3. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    I believe you mean a coating, not actual carbonization, which would entail scorching the wood though flame or actual smoking.

    Not a fan of coatings, but there are many formulae in play, some good, some not.

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    Posted 4 months ago #
  4. timt

    timt

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    I'm indifferent. It started peeling off one of my Petersons but after a dozen or so smokes it's caked over and I've forgotten about it. Well, until you brought it up that is. Thanks a lot.

    Tim
    Posted 4 months ago #
  5. wyfbane

    wyfbane

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    Avoid when possible. But it isn't a dealbreaker.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  6. mso489

    mso489

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    I'm indifferent. I score extra points for a pipe that comes without a bowl coating, feel that it is a sign of enlightened craft. However, more of my pipes came with coatings than didn't, and I have not had any bad experiences -- bad tastes, uneven burning, airway clogging. Most pipe smokers, especially experienced folks, can start smoking a pipe without a coating and bring it along just fine. A beginner who puffs like a locomotive might start a burnout with no coating, but most of us didn't and don't.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  7. warren

    warren

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    Couldn't care less! I'm nost interested in how well a pipe smokes after breaking in. Any coating is long gone before a pipe either settles into the rotation or is discarded.

    A man without a shillelagh is a man without an expedient.
    Posted 4 months ago #
  8. spartacus

    spartacus

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    I’ve never noticed or tasted a difference in my tobacco between a coated and an uncoated pipe. I don’t think my palette is that sensitive.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  9. onestrangeone

    onestrangeone

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    I’m not a fan of the coatings and have gone so far as to remove it on a couple of pipes, nowadays when I get one that’s coated I’ll go ahead and give it a try and if it’s not absolutely horrible tasting I’ll just smoke thru it.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  10. tschiraldi

    tschiraldi

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    Hate it.

    Posted 4 months ago #
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    lawmax3

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    Hate it with a fervent passion!

    Posted 4 months ago #
  12. tavol

    tavol

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    The easiest and best break in from any pipes I've had have been the carbonised pipes from blakemar briars. Linky

    Although if I'm honest, I'm completely unfussed as to if a pipe is coat, raw or carbonised.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  13. saltedplug

    saltedplug

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    Although it's fact that burnouts are rare, makers typically coat. My feeling us that some influential cadre coated their pipes to hide flaws in the wood that might cost money, and that the practice caught on. If makers coat all their pipes, no one can question them about any one pipe's flaws whether or not it has one. Two noted US pipemakers said as much to me by email a few years ago. Or maybe financial worries somehow amounted to fearing burnout. If the reason is financial it would make sense given that there are many other easier ways to make a living.

    The Italians don't coat without acquiring the reputation for burnout.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  14. sasquatch

    sasquatch

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    Big time pipe manufacturers coat the bowl because it gives the pipe a slightly higher chance of not being incinerated by an.... incautious... user. They don't control who buys the pipe or how it is smoked, and the chances of a first-time pipe buyer smoking way too hot are pretty high.

    I don't coat, and I've had like... 1 or 2 pipes sent back to me with burn issues, and really when I think about it, I can't help but think they were user error, like trying to light tobacco that had already burnt kinda thing.

    Todd Johnson did a nice demo with sodium silicate, proving definitively that the coating was helpful as regards torture-testing.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kcDMaHT1khI

    Posted 4 months ago #
  15. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    For some, a light black coating of a smooth chamber may be a good visual thing- sort of like a coat that has a well sewn lining. For others who hate coatings of any sort, they can be sanded, coated with sugar or honey, or merely smoked away.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  16. ashdigger

    ashdigger

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    Just smoke a few bowls of Carter Hall.....boom, instant cake.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  17. franbo

    franbo

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    No significant difference for me. Breaking in a non carbonized bowl just takes time and patience. I presume I’m not as careful with pre carbonized bowls; but it’s never been a dealbreaker either.

    "If you can't send money, send tobacco." -George Washington to the Continental Congress, 1776
    Posted 4 months ago #
  18. cigrmaster

    cigrmaster

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    Not a fan of bowl coatings. I like the flavor of briar when breaking in a new pipe. The pipe also looks much better to my eye with a naked bowl.

    Harris
    Posted 4 months ago #
  19. paulie66scandinavian

    Paul

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    I'm noticing French made pipes come often with 'naked bowl chambers,Yet I do believe back in the days the majority of pipes had non carbonized chambers, personally I prefer bowls with no coatings,yes must confess,I have encountered almost burnt chambers as a result of my own incaution use.Those were reamed estate pipes with no coatings.

    Paul The Scandinavian'
    Posted 4 months ago #
  20. ssjones

    ssjones

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    I prefer a coating, as I don't like breaking new pipes. But, it has to be the "right" coating.
    Peterson coatings taste awful, but come with an alcohol dipped cloth.
    Many artisan makers who coat, use a gelatin based concoction, which is flavor neutral, to my palate.

    Al

    Posted 4 months ago #
  21. enrikon

    enrikon

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    Not a fan of bowl coatings. I like the flavor of briar when breaking in a new pipe. The pipe also looks much better to my eye with a naked bowl

    I share in full.
    There is nothing better than starting a new pipe, with the bare briar bowl. See it darken before your eyes, smoked after smoked.
     

    Posted 4 months ago #

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