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Old Dunhill Tobacco Blends: How Many Can You Name?

(25 posts)
  • Started 4 years ago by woodsroad
  • Latest reply from woodsroad
  1. woodsroad

    woodsroad

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    Dunhill pipe tobacco blends that are out of production. Not just numbers, but blend names.

    Here are two that I can think of:
    Golden Hours
    Mr. Alfred's Own Mixture

    More?

    Posted 4 years ago #
  2. misterlowercase

    misterlowercase

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    I won't go crazy here, as I'm tempted to, but I'd like to see other folks naming some...

    ...I'll post Ye Olde Signe,

    and point to a great little review about it:

    http://glpease.com/BriarAndLeaf/?p=51

    :

    Posted 4 years ago #
  3. petes03

    petes03

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    Well, I can name almost 1000!

    My Mixtures 1-965 anyway, I'm sure there were probably more. I'm sure there was at least 965 though, lol.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  4. lostandfound

    lostandfound

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    Campaign Plug- which I only know of because Misterlowercase.

    Jerod
    Posted 4 years ago #
  5. fishingandpipes

    fishingandpipes

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    Ye Olde Sign sounds wonderful...

    Posted 4 years ago #
  6. woodsroad

    woodsroad

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    Well, I can name almost 1000!
    My Mixtures 1-965 anyway, I'm sure there were probably more. I'm sure there was at least 965 though, lol.

    Sheesh. Some people can't follow directions at all......

    Posted 4 years ago #
  7. mikestanley

    mikestanley

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    1066 Durbar
    1167 Cuba
    october 89
    Marc's Mixture

    Mike S.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  8. misterlowercase

    misterlowercase

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    I like Shell Mixture because it had a bunch of sandblasted pipes on the label!


    Harmony looked cool too,

    But I'm not so sure about My Lady's Mixture,

    Posted 4 years ago #
  9. lochinvar

    lochinvar

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    The late, lamented Baby's Bottom.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  10. huntertrw

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    Do you suppose that Baby's Bottom had an objectionable room-note?

    Love Me, Love My Pipe
    Posted 4 years ago #
  11. mikestanley

    mikestanley

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    "Do you suppose that Baby's Bottom had an objectionable room-note?"

    Only to those who don't like Latakia. I suppose some would prefer a baby's bottom to the burning leaf!

    Mike S.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  12. misterlowercase

    misterlowercase

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    The old canister style tins were much better for the artwork.
    I know this trio is still in production, but the tin art is just too cool.
    It was a genius move to market the morn-noon-night blend styles,
    a great idea!

    Posted 4 years ago #
  13. zekest

    zekest

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    Elizabethan!

    The original is still the best Virginia/Perique there ever was.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  14. andystewart

    andystewart

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    Marc's Mixture. I knew Marc Burrows - who created this for Dunhill - quite well when he used to work for them. Also Duke Street; the Dunhill store is on the corner of Jermyn Street and Duke Street, where I have quite a lot of clients. Hence knowing Marc Burrows as I hid in his store during breaks!

    Andy

    "I don’t know how else to say it: you don’t see bums smoking pipes." Charlie Kramer
    Posted 4 years ago #
  15. woodsroad

    woodsroad

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    Thanks everyone. A trip back in time.....

    Posted 4 years ago #
  16. gregprince

    gregprince

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    I'll kick in Prince of Wales and Savory's mixture.

    Posted 4 years ago #
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    Anonymous

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    1066 Durbar
    1167 Cuba
    october 89
    Marc's Mixture

    Mike S.

    Mike S. blend?

    Are you related to Cap'n Bob?

    Posted 4 years ago #
  18. jimbo44

    jimbo44

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  19. huntertrw

    huntertrw

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    As I reviewed Mr. Loring's list of Dunhill tobaccos it brought to mind a quote by the late actor William Conrad as related by Richard Carleton Hacker in his "The Ultimate Pipe Book":

    ""Dunhill must have three thousand and one custom blends," he says, "of which 3,000 must have been mine, looking for the right mixture!""

    Posted 4 years ago #
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    Anonymous

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    From Jimbo's link.

    Negrohead (see Shell)

    or Negro Head Twist (1938)

    Re-introduce that one, and watch the fur fly!

    Posted 4 years ago #
  21. woodsroad

    woodsroad

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    Thanks, Jimbo

    Posted 4 years ago #
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    I think Jimbo delivered the knockout punch to submissions on this thread.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  23. 4nogginsmike

    4nogginsmike

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    There have been so many fine blends that have gone out of production, for a variety of reasons, the inability to get the tobacco, or get it at a suitable price, but more importantly in today's world, not just its profitability but instead whether its profitability is substantial enough to justify its being carried forward as part of a production stable. In a word, greed, the one standard that seems to endure. I don't deny that business must profit to continue doing business, but it would seem that the importance of keeping a blend, let's say, alive suffers due to an untoward emphasis on a desirable profit margin.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  24. misterlowercase

    misterlowercase

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    I think Jimbo delivered the knockout punch to submissions on this thread.

    Indeed!

    I think John Loring named 'em all each and every one!

    I can add a descriptor of a little known and largely forgotten patent for compressing tobacco, which was offered for quite a long while...

    "A second, little noticed today, packaging development dates to the Great War when, in 1915 Dunhill began offering all its blends “packed for campaigning” in a patented quarter pound compressed pack covered with lead foil and sold in a canvas bag intended to serve as a tobacco pouch when the tobacco was rubbed out. This compressed packaging, unchanged in form and design, was offered into the 1960s “for Sportsmen and Travellers”. It appears that throughout the time offered there was essentially no pricing premium for the compressed packaging." - John Loring


    Dunhill Pat. No. 10723/15

    Improvements in or relating to the Packetting of Loose Tobaccos.

    I, Alfred Dunhill, of 31, Duke Street, St. James's, London, S.1.,Tobacconist, Cigar Importer and Pipe Manufacturer, do hereby declare the nature of this invention to be as follows-

    The invention consists of improvements in or relating to the packetting of loose tobaccos or tobacco mixtures, hereinafter referred to as loose tobacco.

    Loose tobacco when sold in packets intended to be kept in stock for some time is enclosed in tin-foil and an outer paper wrapping. Having regard to its weight tobacco when so packetèd occupies a considerable bulk. This bulkiness, which is a disadvantage in certain circumstances, can not be reduced by compression in the case of the ordinary method of packetting, as compression of the tobacco before it is enclosed in the tin-foil is impractical and compression of the tobacco after it has been wrapped in tin-foil is also impractical as the iin-foil is broken as soon as the tobacco is subjected to a moderate degree of compression.

    My invention has been devised with the object of enabling a moderate weight of tobacco, say one-quarter to half a pound, to be packetted within a small compass and yet to be provided with a preservative covering of tin-foil.

    According to my invention the required weight of tobacco is first enclosed in a bag, made of linen, calico or other suitable fabric and provided with a mouth adapted to be closed by a string or strings. This bag after being flattened by hand to a shape somewhat resembling a slab is inserted in a tubular or endless or pocket-shaped tin-foil wrapper. The end or ends of the wrapper is or are then folded so as to entirely envelope the bag. The bag enclosed in tin-foil is then placed in a former or mould of box-shape which is secured to the base of a screw or other press and is provided with a movable bottom consisting of a plate or ejector adapted to be raised by the action of a treadle or hand lever. A loose block of wood of approximately the same size as the interior of the former is then placed on the top of the packet, and the press operated so as to cause the head of its screw or plunger to bear on the wood block and compress the packet to the required extent. The packet, which will then be in the form of a flat slab, is ejected from the former or mould by raising the plate forming the movable bottom of said former. The packet is then scaled in any suitable manner, such as by means of two strips of paper encircling the packet and arranged at right angles to one another, or is enclosed in a paper wrapping sealed or secured in any suitable manner.

    Loose tobacco when packctted in the above described manner occupies but little bulk, and as the packets are made of slab form packets containing, say, four ounces of tobacco can be readily slipped into a smoker's pocket. Moreover when the tin-foil has been stripped off the tobacco can remain in the bag and can be readily loosened without removing the tobacco from the bag.

    Dated this 8th day of October, 1914

    Complete Specification:

    I, ALFRED DUNHILL, of 31 Duke Street, St. James's, London, S.W.,
    Tobacconist, Cigar Importer and Pipe Manufacturer, do hereby declare the nature of this invention and in what manner the same is to be performed, to be particularly described and ascertained in and by the following statement -

    The invention consists of improvements in or relating to the packetting of loose tobaccos or tobacco mixtures, hereinafter referred to as loose tobacco.

    Loose tobacco when sold in packets intended to be kept in stock for some time is enclosed in metal-foil which is itself sometimes enclosed in an outer paper wrapping. Having regard to its weight loose tobacco when so packetted occupies a considerable bulk. This bulkiness is a disadvantage in certain cases.

    The present invention consists of an improved method of packetting loose tobacco which possesses certain advantages hereinafter referred to.

    According to one way of carrying out the invention the required weight of loose tobacco is first enclosed in a bag, made of linen, calico or other suitable fabric and provided with a mouth adapted to be closed by a string or strings.

    This bag after being flattened by hand to a shape somewhat resembling a slab is inserted in a tubular or endless or pocket-shaped metal-foil wrapper. The end or ends of the wrapper is or are then folded so as to entirely envelope the bag. The bag enclosed in metal-foil is then placed in a former or mould of box-shape which is secured to the base of a screw or other press and is provided with a movable bottom consisting of a plate or ejector 'adapted to be raised by the action of a treadle or hand lever. A loose block of wood of approximately the same size as the interior of the former or mould is then placed on the top of the packet, and the press operated so as to cause its screw or plunger to bear on the wood block and press the packet to the required extent.

    The packet, which will then be in the form of a flat slab, is ejected from the former or mould by raising the plate forming the movable bottom of said former. The packet is then sealed in any suitable manner, such as by means of two strips of paper encircling the packet and arranged at right angles to one another, or is enclosed in a paper wrapping sealed or secured in any suitable manner.

    According to a slightly modified method of carrying out the invention the linen, calico or like bag containing the required weight of loose tobacco is placed in the above referred to former or mould and subjected to a preliminary moderate pressure. The bag is then removed from the former or mould, wrapped in a sheet of metal-foil, and again subjected to pressure in the former or mould.

    The pressure employed in this second stage is considerably greater than that used in the first or preliminary stage.

    In both cases the loose tobacco before it is placed in the linen or like bag is preferably enclosed in parchmentized paper, waxed paper or any other suitable material which, whilst not imparting a flavour to the tobacco, will prevent the
    material of the bag extracting the moisture of the tobacco. The metal-foil used for the outer preservative cover would be of the necessary degree of stoutness, such for instance as that known to the trade as " heavy gauge metal-foil ". Compression of the loose tobacco may be effected by means of apparatus other than that above described.

    Loose tobacco packetted according to the present invention occupies but little -bulk, and, as the packets are made of slab form, packets containing, say, four ounces of tobacco can be readily slipped into a smoker's pocket.

    Moreover when the metal-foil has been stripped off, the tobacco can remain in the bag and can be readily loosened without removing the tobacco from the bag.

    Dated this 8th day of April, 1915

    :

    ...and,
    the old "self-filling cartridges" circa from about 1910 up until the 30's I think?


    Posted 4 years ago #
  25. woodsroad

    woodsroad

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    " In a word, greed, the one standard that seems to endure. I don't deny that business must profit to continue doing business, but it would seem that the importance of keeping a blend, let's say, alive suffers due to an untoward emphasis on a desirable profit margin. "

    I have to take exception to this statement. A tobacco company's mission is not to keep blends alive. It is to keep the company alive. And thriving. Witness the trimming of the C&D blend inventory.

    "Greed" seems to be the new boogie man in some political circles. What is it? It is amorphous. It is a chameleon. It shifts and changes depending on who it needs to be thrown at or what needs to be vilified. As a sole proprietor, allow me to tell you a few things about Profit, the evil twin of Greed. I have heard over and over that too much profit is a bad thing. There is no such thing as "untoward emphasis on a desirable profit margin". In business, everything must be concentrated on maximizing return. One never knows how or when a loss may occur, and therefore you have to make hay while the sun is shining. All businesses have limited production capabilities. To tie up production with a low-yield product, when a higher margin item can be produced in it's place is to put your entire operation at risk. It is irresponsible to your employees who count on you to keep them employed, and it is actionable by your investors.

    It seems odd to me that as investors, we always look for the highest return with the lowest risk. Yet so many of us, as consumers, expect businesses to take much more risk for a lower return. Otherwise, we brand them as greedy. It's a fundamental contradiction.

    Profit is what makes paychecks possible. It builds cities, funds government and lifts all ships. It makes a good life possible. It is the lifeblood of our nation. When businesses fail, when profits fall, we all suffer.

    Don't let people tell you that there is such a thing as "excessive profit". Chances are, they have a motive for doing so. They will try to conflate profit and unethical/unlawful behavior. All you need to do is ask yourself: Who do I want to be working for? A profitable company, or a very profitable company?

    Posted 4 years ago #

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