Pipes Magazine » Pipe Talk

Search Forums  
   
Tags:  No tags yet. 

My New Morta

(62 posts)
  • Started 1 year ago by Trever Talbert
  • Latest reply from Chris
  1. trevert

    Trever Talbert

    Junior Member
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 61

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Hey guys, just wanted to post a bit about the newest addition to my collection. As some of you know, I've been a professional pipemaker for many years, and I was one of the first people to work heavily with morta. Thus far I've worked mainly with Breton morta taken from the bogs around where we lived in France, so I'm very familiar with that material but am on the hunt for other sources of good quality stuff. In Bretagne, the light colored morta was crap - Mostly unusable and not very pleasant to taste (My general guess was, "Needs a couple thousand more years of cooking time). Anyway, I got hold of some stock of a much lighter color and was assured that it was quality stuff, but I wanted to experience it for myself before I thought about turning any of it into pipes to sell. Ergo, my first new pipe for myself in quite a while:

    Even though it was mostly a lark and I more or less slapped it together out of some spare parts, it came out pretty well and I'm all happy to have a new pipe to smoke again I made it as a 9mm filter pipe because I knew I'd smoke it a lot more that way. So far the material smokes GREAT - I'm in love with it already and it's nice to have a morta that's bigger than a thimble, even though it doesn't smoke anything at all like the Breton morta I'm familiar with.

    Anyway, there's my new pipe. Hurray! Smoked it last night while watching the western series "Hell on Wheels" on Netflix and it made a perfect accompaniment.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  2. vespertillio

    vespertillio

    Member
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 269

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    That looks very groovy. Congrats on an awesome looking pipe sir.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  3. gwtwdbss

    Chris

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2012
    Posts: 3,080

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I like it!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  4. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,066

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Trevert, c'est variment une chef-d'oeuvre! Doesn't look to me like ssomething you "more or less slapped it together out of some spare parts"

    Obtaining a morta pipe is on my bucket list. I'll probably have to custom order one because I've yet to find one in the shape, stem and size I want. And as you noted, bog oak is very hard to find lately.

    Someday

    Posted 1 year ago #
  5. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 2,694

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Great looking pipe, I owned one of your pipes from years ago. But alas it was stolen!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  6. riptide

    Charles

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2010
    Posts: 700

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Great looking pipe. I could not tell it was just slapped together by looking at it.

    Charles D. Wilemon
    Posted 1 year ago #
  7. rigmedic1

    rigmedic1

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 3,039

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Wow, that is the best looking pipe I have seen ever. I am very fond of rusticated and sandblasted pipes, but I have never seen work like that on briar. Morta is on my PAD list; I hope I find something as nice. The color is beautiful. Hats off to you, sir.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  8. martiniman

    martiniman

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Apr 2012
    Posts: 935

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    WOW beautiful pipe.
    Like most Morta is on the list here, I only ever see 1 or 2 makers utilizing it and they are all dark.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  9. martiniman

    martiniman

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Apr 2012
    Posts: 935

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I was just admiring the pipe again and was imagining the interesting tactile feel of a surface like that....

    Posted 1 year ago #
  10. pstlpkr

    Lawrence

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2009
    Posts: 10,231

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Looks like wire brush rustication to me.


    "Ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put." Winston Churchill
    View Lawrence  Whitcomb's profile on LinkedIn
    Posted 1 year ago #
  11. jah76

    jah76

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2012
    Posts: 1,524

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    That is beautiful. It almost looks "woven".

    Posted 1 year ago #
  12. shawn

    shawn

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 560

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    That is just super. What a wonderful job.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  13. ejames

    ejames

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 2,972

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I really like the colors in that pipe! I wish I could slap one together like that! Beautiful piece! One of these days I hope to buy one of your pipes.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  14. cajunguy

    Cajunguy

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 807

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    That is one awesome looking pipe. I have a morta pipe, and I love the material. That is definitely a winner.

    "It's like, how much more black could this be? and the answer is none. None more black." - Nigel Tufnel, Spinal Tap
    Posted 1 year ago #
  15. trevert

    Trever Talbert

    Junior Member
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 61

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Thanks for all the kind words, guys! I'm really pleased with it so far. It isn't wire-brush rustication, it's sandblasted. That's just the way the material blasts. Thankfully it is a lot easier to blast than the black morta I've worked with previously! The real question will be whether it proves as durable. The first smoke last night was terrific, though.

    As far as being slapped together, it's pretty much a spare parts pipe, as most of my testers are. The stem is a molded acrylic piece that I drilled to accept a 9mm filter tenon - I've got several of these stems lying around, had them for years and no real use for them, so it was readymade for this. The shank end cap is a press-on copper band that I hand-etched to create a stippled pattern and at least make it look a little more interesting. The fun thing about the bowl and the shank is that the material won't turn worth anything on the lathe (It's WAY harder to turn than briar) so I had to shape the bowl totally by hand and actually eyeball-sand the shank down until it would fit the band.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  16. User has not uploaded an avatar

    arinbjorn

    Junior Member
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 85

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Trevor, that is just plain amazing.

    I dig the tactile feel of pipes. That pipe kind of makes my knees quiver, brother.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  17. trevert

    Trever Talbert

    Junior Member
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 61

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    (Newbie question - Is there a way to auto-quote specific messages here so I can reply to specific comments? I don't see anything like the usual forum 'Quote' buttons...)

    One thing I wanted to mention about the color - This is something of an experiment for me because my opinion of light-colored morta has not been very high in the past, based on my personal experience with the lighter colored morta from the Briere marsh. There, I only wanted to make pipes if the stuff was pure, natural black. Light colors like this indicated that the wood would be much too soft, often partly rotted, and always with a bitter taste to it. The black morta had its own flavor but it was much darker, smokier, and more pleasant assuming you like tobaccos that go with that sort of thing (FWIW, my personal all-time favorite tobac in Breton morta is Gawith Black XX rope). So, I avoided light color morta in general.

    While checking around for future morta sources, I've found a few places offering lighter colored wood for sale and have been pretty skeptical based on my experience in Brittany, but a friend sent me a crate of this stuff to try out and I'm very pleasantly surprised. It IS softer than my black morta, noticeably, but it was uniformly hard (Previous experience with tan morta was also that it sometimes had "soft spots" that I could literally sandblast right through). It doesn't have the smoky flavor of my black morta, either - It's far more neutral. It's going to be fun to work with.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  18. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,066

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    IIRC, the Croatian Morta Master, Devorin, has been using three "types" of Morta that are varying shades of three colors -- the ubiquitous black, of course, then what he calls Copper and lastly Golden. While he says there's really no difference in the three, I'm still a bit skeptical -- while admittedly it may be an erroneous perception on my part, anything but black (as you alluded to, Trevert) may suffer in density, even in quality. I obviously need to do more research before I "jump in," but right now I'm leaning hard on the black version.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  19. trevert

    Trever Talbert

    Junior Member
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 61

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    There is a BIG difference in hardness between the black Breton morta I have and this tan material. That's not necessarily a bad thing - Soft briar can smoke as good as hard briar - but if it affects durability then it's obviously an issue. This stuff works similarly to briar in shaping and detailing. The black, by contrast, is a PIA - I have to use a carbide grinder to make major shape modifications to it and SS cutting bits to shape it, and it will eat up sandpaper discs and wheels fast.

    Also, a direct comparison - I created that blast above in a simple, 2 pass blasting run using glass bead in my cabinet. Glass bead is useless on the black morta I use. Literally, all it will do is polish it and make the surface slightly ripply. If I want to blast the black Breton morta, I have to switch media to an aggressive aluminum oxide at high pressure to get it to cut. I don't have any way to measure and compare hardnesses accurately, but that's a pretty striking difference.

    But, like I said, it smokes great so far. I plan on beating the heck out of it - No rest periods, smoke every day, etc - to see how it holds up under abuse.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  20. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,066

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Aww -- breaks my heart to hear you plan to "abuse" that beauty. But wouldn't it be more fair to at least rest the pipe some? Even the best dense, aged briar pipes won't deliver their best performance without a modicum of proper care

    Posted 1 year ago #
  21. User has not uploaded an avatar

    john218

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 589

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I love that blast. I would like to see this with a cumberland stem, even though this one looks nice. How would you compare the smoking qualities of this wood and black morta to a good quality briar?

    "Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power"

    Abraham Lincoln
    Posted 1 year ago #
  22. lonestar

    lonestar

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2011
    Posts: 2,383

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Beautiful pipe Trever. Its good to see you posting over here.
    For the guys here who dont know Trever Talbert, he's an innovator an originator and someone I consider a leading voice in American pipe making.
    Anyone who is looking to learn about making pipes, or just understand more about making them would do well to dive into the blog he writes.
    His name comes up here on the forum, often around Halloween, and often discussing his "Goblin" pipes. But he is truly an artist and can make a wonderful pipe in just about every style pipes are made.
    Glad to have you aboard !

    Posted 1 year ago #
  23. trevert

    Trever Talbert

    Junior Member
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 61

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Regarding pipe abuse - Unfortunately, that's the nature of the testing game! I need to see how it will perform under very hard use, because I don't want to be having to refund someone's $500 down the road if his pipe unexpectedly burns out. After I moved to France, I made myself a morta poker test pipe ..
    (This one)

    ...and proceeded to smoke it at least once or twice a day, every day, for about three years. Smoked it hot, lighter-torched it, etc, and it took everything I could throw at it. One handy advantage to morta is that it can be smoked day after day without going soggy and sour as briar would. The only side effect was that it caked insanely fast and had to be reamed constantly. I smoked the new pipe twice last night and it never even got gurgly, which was a nice sign.

    As far as a comparison of morta vs briar, well, it's very different. This tan morta is strikingly neutral - It would make a great tester for comparing tobaccos, actually. It's as flavor-neutral as clay without the raw, rough edge that clay adds to everything. I am tremendously happy with the flavor. Black morta vs briar is quite different - It's more of a love it or hate it experience. The material has a very dark, musky characteristic that it imparts to whatever you smoke, so I've found it to be very tobacco-specific. If you smoke the right tobacco in it, it's heavenly. If you try to smoke a sweet aromatic in it, it's downright gross. I mentioned that my favorite tobacco for black morta is Gawith Black Rope XX, and that is (to me) a marriage made in heaven - The rich smokiness of the morta amplifies the impact of the Black XX flavor and it's a very Nirvana experience, provided you keep it to a small bowl so it doesn't kill you. It's fantastic stuff for smoking latakia but not so great for Virginias. And of course, YMMV!

    And thanks for the kind words, Lonestar, whoever you are!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  24. cigrmaster

    cigrmaster

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 7,967

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    That pipe is gorgeous, I would love to own something like that. I have been looking at Morta pipes and have wondered how they smoke compared to a briar pipe. From what I have been reading the morta is much harder and denser wood, would that lead to a cooler smoking pipe? How is it weight wise compared to briar, are they much heavier?

    I have been to Trevor's site a number of times, he makes some awesome pipes. Hopefully one day I will add one to my collection.

    Harris
    Posted 1 year ago #
  25. trevert

    Trever Talbert

    Junior Member
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 61

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    There is an even wider range in morta performance than there is in briar, from what I've experienced.

    Harder and denser - The black morta I work with is much harder than briar. It's more resilient to burn-out by a long stretch. It is not cooler smoking, however - To the tongue, it's about the same. Finger-wise, it gets hotter to touch, but also cools back down faster... A bit like a thick-walled clay, really. This tan morta I just made performs similarly but doesn't seem to get as hot - Then again, it's much larger and thicker walled than most of the small black mortas I've made, so that's certainly a factor.

    Weight - The black material is heavier than briar. The tan material is lighter than briar. If I were to hazard a guess, I'd say it might even be lighter than Turkish meerschaum, but I haven't done any side-by-side weighings.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  26. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,066

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Hmm ... since I smoke more Virginias than anything else ...

    It's interesting to see Trevert that, in your experience, Virginias generally don't perform well in a Morta pipe.

    Definitely something to think about and look into some more before I drop hundreds of dollars on one, only to take pictures of it, point it out as a prized possession, but end up not smoking it.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  27. trevert

    Trever Talbert

    Junior Member
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 61

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    My suggestion is to find a cheap one in the estate market, or get a friend to loan you one to smoke first. Briars are pretty much fire-and-forget, but I always try to talk a little to morta buyers about their favorite tobaccos first before they sink their cash into one, because it can be a wonderful experience or a terrible experience, depending on your tobacco tastes. I can pretty safely say that if you like the Gawith stuff like 1792 and Black XX, or Nightcap, Black Frigate, Old Ironsides, etc, that you would really like morta. Straight Virginias are more of an iffy proposition - Some guys like them in morta but I find the flavor tilt a little weird. Aromatics are almost universally nasty in morta, in my experience. I had ONE try at smoking Stanwell's Rose & Crown in a morta... Never again.

    And boy do I miss that stuff since moving back to the states. I guess we can't get it here. That was one of the few aromatics I ever really loved. It was my Every-December tobacco, like smoking gingerbread cookies.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  28. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,066

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Thanks for the advice, Trevert -- much appreciated!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  29. taerin

    Eric

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 1,920

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I had no idea what morta was so I decided to look it up, first stages of fossilisation in a peat bog, interesting. That was the wierdest looking blast I've ever seen on a pipe, it looks rusticated, but pretty good looking none the less. How does it's cost compare with that of briar? I would guess it to be more rare and expensive.

    From Wikipedia:
    Bog wood at the Stumpy Knowe near South Auchenmade.Bog-wood, also known as morta is wood from trees that have been buried in peat bogs and preserved from decay by the acidic and anaerobic bog conditions, sometimes for hundreds or even thousands of years. The wood is usually stained brown by tannins dissolved in the acidic water. Bog-wood represents the early stages in the fossilisation of wood, with further stages ultimately forming lignite and coal over a period of many millions of years. Bog-wood may come from any tree species naturally growing near or in bogs, including oak (Quercus – "bog oak"), pine (Pinus), yew (Taxus), swamp cypress (Taxodium) and kauri (Agathis). Bog-wood is often removed from fields etc. and placed in clearance cairns.

    "The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time."
    Mark Twain
    Posted 1 year ago #
  30. tbradsim1

    tbradsim1

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 4,585

    online

    Login to Send PM

    I have 2 Palo mortas Rhodesion, chubby billard, smoke only Nitecap in them, thanks for the good info on Morta, mine are the black, very light, did not know you could smoke them hard, cake buildup info is appreciated. The old cajun

    The Old Cajun
    Posted 1 year ago #
  31. jharvard

    jharvard

    Member
    Joined: Dec 2011
    Posts: 210

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Informative thread. Thanks for all the good information. Beautiful and unique pipe. Thanks for sharing.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  32. jameral

    jameral

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Nov 2011
    Posts: 738

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    That's an awesome looking pipe! To me it appears like a diamond pattern knurl, very cool.

    Know your limits but always push the envelope.

    I don't trust air I can't see.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  33. cigrmaster

    cigrmaster

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 7,967

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I smoke stictly VA flakes and Vaper flakes so not sure if Morta would suit me. They sure are cool looking though, if I can find one on the estate market maybe I will grab one, or maybe Trevor will sell me the one he is showing here since it is used, I am sure he wouldn't mind discounting it 75 percent, right Trev?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  34. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,066

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I've been looking -- Morta is scarce now. I am fussy but I'm also cheap. $300-$500 on any pipe just ain't ever gonna happen here.

    I've discussed it with a couple artisans, we'll see how it goes -- if they can get their hands on any quality bog oak.

    Devorin will sell direct *IF* you're not in the USA, because there's one exclusive dealer for his pipes here in the States, whose prices, by the way, Devorian himself finds exhorbitant.

    Rattray and a few others makes some nice ones that can be found that tickle, new, around $200-$250, but I don't like the stems on the ones I've seen. Estate mortas of quality are very rare and you have to move faster than Perrier in the Sahara.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  35. trevert

    Trever Talbert

    Junior Member
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 61

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Ahh, "fussy and cheap"... Two of the picks on the "Choose two of these" pyramid
    Fast - Inexpensive - Quality

    One can only ever pick two of these.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  36. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,066

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    It's all relative I suppose.

    I'm more into quality and perceived value so the expense and the value have to work for me -- it's a personal thing I guess.

    Not casting aspersions on anyone's prices or artistic quality BTW. If the two of my "pyramid" don't meet, I just look elsewhere.

    My wife's a glass artist so I fully understand why she and other artists set prices at what works for them.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  37. oldredbeard

    oldredbeard

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 544

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Thats a very beautiful pipe, wish I could just throw something that nice together out of spare parts.

    I'm not complaining.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  38. bentmike

    bentmike

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 2,388

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    This is a great thread. Thanks for contributing everyone. Beautiful pipes trevert. I like Virginias and aros so I don't know if this type of pipe would work for me but they sure are cool to look at.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  39. photoman13

    photoman13

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2012
    Posts: 2,975

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Wow that is cool. I would love to see some more of your pipes.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  40. trevert

    Trever Talbert

    Junior Member
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 61

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    You can find me with a big of googling, Photoman. The pipe is coming along really nicely, I must say. I've been smoking a bowl in it every night since I finished it and thus far it shows no signs of sourness or any other common problems. It's one of the best smoking pipes I've ever smoked. It's also going *really* nicely with western series "Hell on Wheels" on Netflix every night - The cragginess of the pipe goes well with the cragginess of the series. Dunhill Elizabethan is really good in this, though the ribbon cut suffers from short smokes due to the smaller chamber diameter.

    (Oddball observation - Over the years I've found that morta tends to perform better with a slightly smaller airhole and slightly smaller chamber bore than I would prefer with briar.)

    The downside of the narrower chamber is that it burns through ribbon tobaccos really quickly unless I pack them very tight. It's terrific with flakes, though.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  41. ejames

    ejames

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 2,972

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Wow that is cool. I would love to see some more of your pipes.

    You haven't seen his pipes??!!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  42. trevert

    Trever Talbert

    Junior Member
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 61

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Here's a news update for whomever may be interested. I've been smoking this pipe steadily ever since I posted this. It's already visibly darkening on the outside, especially on the shank, which is interesting. Unfortunately, I don't think this gold material is ready for prime time, or at least not something that I would want to sell. After about 8-10 bowls, I noticed that part of the interior wall had begun that familiar visual giveaway of burning, and further on, the front bowl wall started to develop a nice concavity as the material burned away. There are no flavor cues to this either - It just happily smokes along without giving off any nasty tastes to let me know the material was overheated. This is not something that would ever happen with the black morta I work with. I don't know if it's a trait of gold morta in general, or just this specific supply, but suffice to say this is not something I'd want to risk happening on a pipe I sold.

    FWIW, I've applied a fix which is working well so far. I scraped back the cake and scrubbed away the grey split surface of the burnout spot till I got back to bare wood. I then mixed up a sodium silicate-based coating mix and applied it in several thin layers, resting it on its side to let gravity do the trick of leveling off the concave part of the wall. Once it was roughly level, I sanded the bowl chamber smoother and evened it off, then coated the entire chamber with the same mix. Looking into it now, you can't tell it was ever damaged, and I'm confident that the coating mix will endure any abuse I throw at it so I think it's salvaged as a smoker. Heck, it will probably still be a favorite just because I like the shape and feel of the thing, but it's disappointing that the material didn't hold up any better than that. I plan on returning it to the pipemaker and cussing about the quality of his work.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  43. cigrmaster

    cigrmaster

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 7,967

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Wow, thanks for the update. Very interesting that this type of Morta burns out so quickly. Do you think it could be the smoker hot boxing it like an amateur and not the pipe makers fault?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  44. thesmokindragon

    thesmokindragon

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2011
    Posts: 3,361

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    All I have to say is WOW! And if you think this one rocks,
    try a google for LB Goblins, the claws in smooth and sandblast...
    I need to get a set of those , perfect for a rage'in PAD beast,
    the pipes are outstanding ladies/gents

    Posted 1 year ago #
  45. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,066

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I think it's important to remember that this Morta is special and, in fact, all Mortas are not the same.

    Also, Trevert decided to abuse this pipe, for his own reasons, as delineated above.

    To me, whether Trevert was right or not, it's certain his pipe and his call. But for me, it was sort of watching a new Rolls-Royce being crash-tested into a cement wall ..

    breaks my heart to hear you plan to "abuse" that beauty. But wouldn't it be more fair to at least rest the pipe some? Even the best dense, aged briar pipes won't deliver their best performance without a modicum of proper care

    How would that "test pipe" have fared had it been treated at least as good as, say, a $500 briar?

    Only The Shadow knows for sure. But my take is ... a hell of a lot better.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  46. gwtwdbss

    Chris

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2012
    Posts: 3,080

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    (Newbie question - Is there a way to auto-quote specific messages here so I can reply to specific comments? I don't see anything like the usual forum 'Quote' buttons...)

    Just hit the quote button that is located in the Reply box, paste the copied text, then hit the quote button again. It should look like this below(with quotation marks removed) before you hit the Send Post button:

    "["quote"]"(Newbie question - Is there a way to auto-quote specific messages here so I can reply to specific comments? I don't see anything like the usual forum 'Quote' buttons...)[/quote]

    Posted 1 year ago #
  47. trevert

    Trever Talbert

    Junior Member
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 61

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    How would that "test pipe" have fared had it been treated at least as good as, say, a $500 briar?

    Only The Shadow knows for sure. But my take is ... a hell of a lot better.

    Actually, I don't think there would have been much difference. Most pipes can take a fair amount of abuse just fine, and I need to know what to expect from a material before I try selling it, because the LAST thing you want to do is invest the labor in making the thing and then have to refund it all for a warranty problem. I've given any number of Breton mortas the same treatment and never had an issue with any of them. I'm inclined to lay the fault on the softness of this particular material, which was noticeable per my posts above. Especially given the particular nature of the damage, which was even and spread out, rather than concentrated via parched-earth-style cracking.

    Stress testing is just part of the biz.

    Do you think it could be the smoker hot boxing it like an amateur and not the pipe makers fault?

    In my experience, it is *always* the pipemaker's fault, even when the pipe has been dropped from a second floor onto concrete.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  48. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,066

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Stress testing is just part of the biz.

    it is *always* the pipemaker's fault, even when the pipe has been dropped from a second floor onto concrete.

    I certainly see where you're coming from for sure, Trevert.

    I'm just a romantic -- this is sort of like taking the prettiest girl in high school to the prom then dancing her to death on the dance floor

    Posted 1 year ago #
  49. winterland

    winterland

    Member
    Joined: Oct 2011
    Posts: 103

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Goblin pipes. Hmmm, will have to do a search

    Posted 1 year ago #
  50. gwtwdbss

    Chris

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2012
    Posts: 3,080

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Goblin pipes. Hmmm, will have to do a search

    WOW!

    Goblins

    Posted 1 year ago #
  51. trevert

    Trever Talbert

    Junior Member
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 61

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Actually the catalog is kind of embarrassing at the moment - The Goblins page is a whole bunch of examples of the same shape! That doesn't happen often.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  52. gwtwdbss

    Chris

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2012
    Posts: 3,080

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Actually the catalog is kind of embarrassing at the moment - The Goblins page is a whole bunch of examples of the same shape! That doesn't happen often.

    I have the site bookmarked so I will be checking back from time to time. The Talbert Section is simply mind blowing. Great work!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  53. photoman13

    photoman13

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2012
    Posts: 2,975

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    You are Trever Talbert! Wow I'm an idiot! Man your pipes are one of the reason I got into smoking pipes. It is a true honor to talk to you.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  54. thesmokindragon

    thesmokindragon

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2011
    Posts: 3,361

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    The Goblin claws are outstanding shapes in both blast and smooth finish

    Posted 1 year ago #
  55. topd

    TopD

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2012
    Posts: 1,796

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I, like Eric had to look up 'Morta" as I had never heard of it before. After reading the Wikipedia explanation,
    I was wondering if the different color morta has to do with what kind of wood fell into the bog (pine, oak, possibly
    yew), or how long it was there (500 years, or 10,000 years)? I can't imagine pine making a good pipe, but I'm not
    privy to what the bog does to the wood chemically with time. Also the amount of tannins in the bog may affect how
    quickly the wood is preserved.
    In any account, I WANT ONE! That is a beautiful pipe Trever!

    Steve 'Top' Downey
    Master Sergeant
    USMC - Retired
    Posted 1 year ago #
  56. photoman13

    photoman13

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2012
    Posts: 2,975

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    +1 topd and the smokindragon

    Posted 1 year ago #
  57. tbradsim1

    tbradsim1

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 4,585

    online

    Login to Send PM

    TopD I have 2 a chubby and a Rhodesion made by Palo Becker, I treated myself when I turned 70, I read they carbon dated the darker the wood the older it was, 2000 to 5000 yrs old they smoke dry kind of like a Meer, I don"t smoke aros in them just Nitecap. The old cajun

    Posted 1 year ago #
  58. trevert

    Trever Talbert

    Junior Member
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 61

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Thanks for the kind words, guys. Also, sorry I haven't been more active in here lately - I'm pretty deeply sunk into work on a complicated Halloween pipe right now and that's devouring nearly all my time. My working days are consisting mainly of sitting in the workshop listening to the audiobook of Dan Simmons' "The Terror" and carving and carving and carving...

    I gave this morta pipe its first smoke last night since applying the chamber patch and new bowl coating, and it did just fine. I think it's going to be OK from here out, I expect. It's certainly going to get a workout this October, once Universal and Hammer horror season begins.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  59. photoman13

    photoman13

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2012
    Posts: 2,975

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I love your halloween pipes. Make sure you post a pic here when it's done.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  60. trevert

    Trever Talbert

    Junior Member
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 61

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I love your halloween pipes. Make sure you post a pic here when it's done.

    I don't think the rules here favor posting commercial pics of work for sale. You can see a lot of progress photos of it on our FB and Twitter pages, though. And, in theory, on our G+ page, for those times when I remember that G+ exists...

    Posted 1 year ago #
  61. shawn622

    shawn622

    Knucklehead
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 1,097

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Wow man!!! Thats a very hansom, manly pipe!!! Enjoy!!!

    There's nothing quite like tobacco: it's the passion of decent folk, and whoever lives without tobacco doesn't deserve to live.
    -Moliere
    Posted 1 year ago #
  62. gwtwdbss

    Chris

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2012
    Posts: 3,080

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I'm pretty deeply sunk into work on a complicated Halloween pipe right now and that's devouring nearly all my time.

    I just started following you on Twitter. That is one wicked looking pipe you're carving!

    Posted 1 year ago #

Reply

You must log in to post.

 

 

    Back To Top  | Back to Forum Home Page

   Members Online Now
   lostandfound, msandoval858, conlejm, tennsmoker, rwramsey, yaddy306, phonomet, arno665, coalsmoke, okiescout, tuckahoe, goinslow, papipeguy, twoonefive, kcvet67, cwspook, twangthang, dochudson, tbradsim1, blendtobac