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Memorial Day

(29 posts)
  • Started 1 month ago by fishnbanjo
  • Latest reply from hawky454
  1. fishnbanjo

    fishnbanjo

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    I wrote this a few years back after losing my uncle Mike but the sentiments are still the same.

    Ever since returning home from Vietnam in 1970 Memorial Day has held a different perspective in both my heart and my mind, I have found that as the years pass many emotions come to the fore, some good, some not so and many bitter-sweet, especially now that I have been told my Mantle Cell Lymphoma is now active again, this was written a few years ago but the thoughts are the same for me especially since I lost uncle Mike last year who was 93.

    It's Memorial Day weekend again. To many Memorial Day is the official launch to summer, to veterans, and others, it has a distinctively different meaning.

    In 1868 Decoration Day was proclaimed on May 30th as a day to place flowers on the graves of those who had died in the recent battles of the Civil War, or as out southern brethren refer to it "the war of Northern Aggression" . By 1882 it was often referred to as Memorial Day but was not officially recognized as such until 1967.

    Many of you here know I am first generation born here. I have always been aware of what this day meant even though most of the folks I knew growing up had been in the service it was not in service to this nation with the exception of my uncle Michael Capone who was one of the marines in the third wave in the battle of Iwo Jima.

    My uncle never talked about his war experiences but did on occasion speak about the men he served with and I can remember the tears filling in his eyes as his speech slowly was replaced with silence. I never really understood this until I returned from Viet Nam in 1970 and visited my uncle and the looks we exchanged at that meeting were more powerful than words.

    Memorial Day for me after my service changed, I no longer went to the parades which had taken on a more celebratory tone to welcome in the summer, instead I would usually find myself in my sports room in quiet reflection.

    Many here also know I've been quite ill since being diagnosed with Mantle Cell Lymphoma (a form of non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma) last year which has been associated with 6 months of spraying while serving in the Danang area in Viet Nam 1969-1970. Much of my thoughts the past year have been in wondering what, if any, legacy I would leave since I have no children to remember me and the end of our family in this country is nigh as my only living relative is my sister who has never had children as well.

    A lot of this was actively in my mind when I decided to give up the website I had owned and nourished, the Classic Fly Rod Forum, and I knew that, at least for a little while, I would be remembered there but what about a lasting legacy?

    I was gifted a book by Robert Whitaker recently entitled "Land of Lost Content" which is about the history if the Isles of Shoals and the surrounding area including the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard where I was employed for over 30 years prior to my retirement in 2005. It's an excellent book and I learned some things I did not know specifically about the shipyard.

    As well as it being Memorial Day weekend yesterday was the 70th anniversary of the sinking of the USS Squalus on her 19th test dive off the Isle of Shoals. At 0840 hours 23 May 1939 on it's 19th test dive the order was given by her captain to "Blow Main Ballast" which the Squalus failed to do and it sank at 243' in the Atlantic killing 26 of its crew.

    At 1130 hours her sister ship, Sculpin, set out to sea for her own testing and followed the course of the Squalus. At 1241 hours the telephone buoy of the Squalus was sighted by the Sculpin who notified the shipyard that Squalus was in danger. It took 2 days and the McCann Rescue Chamber 4 trips to to rescue the remaining 33 crew members, the first time in history anyone had been rescued from a sunken submarine. In September 1939 the shipyard made history again when it successfully brought the Squalus to the surface where it was towed to the shipyard, repaired, renamed Sailfish and recommissioned.

    Sailfish made history in WW II becoming the first US naval vessel to sink a Japanese ship, the Chuyo, unbeknown to the crew of the Sailfish the Chuyo had 21 POW's aboard all who were survivors of the sinking of the Squalus only to have their lives taken by that very ship under its new name.

    The Portsmouth Naval Shipyard has a long and glorious history, founded privately in 1798 in Kittery (a town in Maine which was a territory of Massachusetts until becoming a state in 1820), it became a Naval Shipyard in 1800 and built sailing ships for the US Navy and it's motto "Sails to Atoms" is a part of its legacy.

    Portsmouth is the site of many firsts, it built the first government submarine in 1914 which was the only US submarine to serve in WW I. The first submarine to circumnavigate the world was built there, as was the first to travel around Cape Horn South America. As I already mentioned the Sailfish was the first submarine to sink an enemy vessel using a torpedo and the USS Archerfish, a Portsmouth sub, was the first to sink a Japanese aircraft carrier. Other notable firsts include, longest submerged run by a diesel powered submarine, first all welded hull, first with a torpedo bubble eliminator, first to have onboard air conditioning, first whale shaped vessel, fasted submarine in the world (still maintained), first nuclear submarine built by government workers and the first nuclear submarine to sail into the western Pacific.

    The last nuclear submarine built by Portsmouth was the Sandlance which was commissioned and launched in 1971. It became a member of Submarine Division 42 (Sub Div 42) a division of Submarine Squadron 4 in Charleston South Carolina which I was attached to in the Operations Office and served as the Admiral's driver.

    As I said earlier I worked at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard and retired in 2005 and the past year I've reflected about those years and what I did. I became the first Nuclear Fire Watch as part of the ManRem program (I was the ManRem coordinator for the welding shop (Shop 26), ManRem signified the radiation dosage taken by individuals while working in a radiation area and the task was to minimize annual exposure and maintain excellence in completion of the job) which is still used today. I later became an apprentice in the Maintenance and Repair Shop (Shop 06) and was a nuclear and radiological worker there in support of Refueling/Defueling submarines.

    During my tenure in Shop 06 I worked on the Reactor Security System which was very problematic and constantly sending off false alarms which activated our Marine Cadre with live weapon response. I later became an Electrical Engineering Technician in Production Engineering (Code 380) where I designed a new security system for new and spent fuel that was accepted by NAVSEA and is now utilized at all 4 US Naval Shipyards.

    While attached to Code 380 I also made site visits to other naval facilities and was asked to design a Radiation Alarm System for a radiation processing barge in CT, they only needed it to show an alarm when airborne contamination was present but I provided them with visual as well as audio detection with the ability to silence the audio portion while maintaining the ability to monitor airborne visually until levels had returned to a safe condition which won them an award for excellence in safety and I a monetary award.

    Handling new and spent fuel was a tedious task especially when moving to and from the reactor building since the weight of the fuel had to be accurate to within 10% from point of lift to the reactor enclosure and due to the hystersious of the mechanical strain gauges used in handling in excess of 100,000 lbs it could take up to 10 hours for the gauge to settle for the reading to be taken. I was tasked to find some weight gauges which would reduce the time to settle and found a company that had some gauges that used piezio electric strain regulators that produced a 20 Ma signal which could be processed by a digital readout +/- 0.02% at 200,000 lbs. I made arrangements to rent 2 of the devices with readouts for testing purposes. The tests went exceptionally well and the original devices were purchased and introduced as Government Furnished Equipment (GFE) for refueling handling gear and required a total rewrite of Chapter 25 Lifting and Handling Manual. Again, a monetary award was received.

    Naval Research Vessel 1, known as NR1, was the Navy's deep diving test submarine and was schedule for its last refueling at Portsmouth and I was assigned to the NR1 project. My assignment was to design, and manufacture, the lifting and handling devices for the reactor source, i.e. the source had to be removed from the reactor vessel, stored while it was being refueled and replaced when refueling was completed. The device I designed, and supplied, was unique as it handled both applications being it monitored weight and stress. Once again I received a monetary award and a Sustained Superior Performance Achievement Award.

    Our Production Engineering Dept. (Code 380) had been absorbed by the Nuclear Engineering Dept. (Code 2310) as consolidation measure and duplicity was being downsized within the government so I was now assigned to Code 2310. I had completed the captivation and inspection for the RAE (Reactor Access Enclosure) on the latest submarine we had in for refueling and we were awaiting refueling to start on Monday. It was late Friday afternoon and I was about 15 minutes from leaving for the day when my boss came to my desk.

    My boss asked how long it would take to rebuild the RAE power system. I figured he asked me this since I had completed the testing and captivation of the building for the present refueling and he was looking ahead for when refueling was complete to see if there was enough lead time to modernize it for the next refueling. I told Bruce 6 months to complete the tear down and construction paperwork and have it approved and 3 months lead time to write the paperwork ordering the parts, getting them funded and received so 9 months to 1 year for completion. Bruce looked at me and said "we have less than 3 days".

    I was sure I misunderstood him stating that refueling was to start on Monday. Bruce stated that there had been a fire in the RAE and the total electrical power system had been destroyed and we had 96 hours to come up with an alternate means of being able to refuel the sub or it would be defueled and decommissioned, a loss of a 24.5 million dollar ship. After a few moments to digest what he had just told me I told him to give me 15 minutes to come up with some ideas and we'd talk.

    As part of the design team for this refueling package I was well aware of the electrical requirements of this refueling as I designed the umbilical cords that feed the rod mechanisms to remove and install the fuel rods. I spent the next 10 minutes on the phone finding out what the smallest penetration was between several enclosures and the reactor compartment and with those numbers I called the Temporary Electrical Services Supervisor who I had requisitioned the cables I used, and reconfigured, for the umbilicals. I asked how many temporary dockside power packs he had in working condition (we called them 6 packs as they had 6 power feeds with circuit breakers and used the cables I reconfigured on the output end to feed the rod mechanisms and the power side used the same interface in the RAE) he told me he had 10 and I told him I needed 6 of them and would send documentation shortly with instructions.

    In just under an hour I had put together what I called the Emergency Refueling Temporary Power Supply with instructions on how to use it and wrote the necessary paperwork to have it built, tested and deployed.

    Refueling was to begin at 1000 hours on Monday and we still had not heard a word from the Refueling Coordinator nor the Production Dept. Refueling Manager (PDRM) as to how things were proceeding, at 1100 hours my boss received a phone call telling him refueling was proceeding on target and expected to meet, or exceed, completion, we were ecstatic.

    Upon completion of refueling operations the PDRM requested the gear be given YFE status (Yard Furnished Equipment) to be added to the standard refueling gear available for future needs. As with most refuelings a NAVSEA representative was present as an overseer and was impressed by the immediate response to the loss of the RAE power and the ability of the shipyard engineering staff to begin, and complete, refueling without interference, he recommended the emergency system to be built and maintained by all naval refueling facilities as GFE gear and this was a rather large monetary award............

    As I reminisced my 30 plus years and the things I have accomplished at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard I found I'd left my legacy, not as a named individual but as a part of a long, and historical, part of the finest shipyard in the Navy, may she live and prosper for a long time.

    To those who hold the traditions of Memorial Day and its meaning my thoughts are with you. To those who see it as a celebration of the summer ahead, Happy Memorial Day................
    banjo

    Posted 1 month ago #
  2. anthonyrosenthal74

    anthonyrosenthal74

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    Fantastic story, Fish. Thank you for sharing that.

    Part of me hates what has become of Memorial Day. So many see it as just that... a day to go to the lake or the beach, fire up a grill and open a bunch of beers. And they blow an entire paycheck to do so, without hardly a thought of those who have given their all and fought and died for this country.

    For me it's something else entirely. I'll think about those who sacrificed everything for this nation. I'll think about my father, who although he came home from Vietnam, it was likely Agent Orange that led to so many of his health issues later in life. He didn't die in Vietnam, but it still eventually killed him so many years later. He passed on January 4 2018. Aside from that, thinking about all those who sacrificed on foreign and domestic soil throughout the history of the United States or America, I'll also remember 9/11/2001 and all those who died that day. Military, civilian, fire department and law enforcement.

    In my opinion it is imperative that we as a nation always remember these things. We should NEVER forget. Pearl Harbor should always be on our minds. 9/11 should always be on our minds. All the wars that have been fought and all the people who have died should always be on our minds. Because when we forget these things is when we get sucker punched again.

    Arrrrr, shiver me timbers! International Talk Like a Pirate Day is September the 19th!!!
    Brothers Of The Black Frigate
    Posted 1 month ago #
  3. fishnbanjo

    fishnbanjo

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    I’m sorry for the loss of your father Anthony, Agent Orange, the silent killer from Vietnam and Thailand, has done lots of damage to those that served and even their offspring.
    I have Mantle Cell Lymphoma that has been directly made responsible for 6 1/2 months daily exposure. I also have a kidney disease, have been hospitalized twice with renal failure the last time just over a month ago. I also have an autoimmune deficiency that requires I receive ivIG infusions weekly this is tied to a neurological disorder called Stiff Person Syndrome, and autonomic dysfunction disorder, all of this is tied to Agent Orange, it will 50 years ago I went to Vietnam and not a day goes by I don’t remember the spraying, be well sir.
    Sante L. Giuliani aka banjo

    Posted 1 month ago #
  4. mso489

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    My wife and I bought a VFW poppy from the gent in the fatigue cap at the door of the local cafeteria. We established we are both Vietnam vets, and my wife explained how it is she is the daughter of a WWI (One!) vet. On the way out, she recited the complete Flanders Field poem to what became a gathering of onlookers, something she's had in her memory since grade school.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  5. warren

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    It's only fitting we have such a day of formal remembrance. For those who served, every day is memorial day for missing friends and comrades. And, let us not forget the families left bereaved.

    I will fly the flag, visit a couple of cemeteries and raise a bitter sweet toast to those departed friends.

    A man without a shillelagh is a man without an expedient.
    Posted 1 month ago #
  6. spartacus

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    What a great legacy Banjo. You should be proud of all you have done. This Memorial Day will be to remember all those in my family that have served and those that continue to serve. I will smoke a bowl for you as well. Thank you!

    Posted 1 month ago #
  7. jpmcwjr

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    Yes, good to renew our observation of Memorial Day at this time. I will try to observe it correctly, even though it's also my birthday.

    And sorry for your loss, Anthony. Was your dad in his 70's?

    Memorial Day is not the only day I thank God I didn't have to go to Vietnam. My heart goes out to those who did.

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    Posted 1 month ago #
  8. anthonyrosenthal74

    anthonyrosenthal74

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    Was your dad in his 70's?
    He would have been 70 this past April.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  9. trouttimes

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    Banjo, love the story. I think Memorial Day definitely has a different meaning to those who served and those who lost brothers. This is a time when you can't escape thinking back on your service and why you did it. When you consider how few served compared to the total population it is no surprise that few look at it as anything but the summer kickoff. I wouldn't wish most of what I have seen or done on others but I'm not sorry for the choices I made and I know very few vets that don't feel that same way. I came from a long line of military guys and my boys are carrying on the tradition and I proud of that. I do worry that more in this country don't see the need to serve in some way. I hope when the time comes that this country needs people to step up, we would find ourselves short. This is one of the best countries in the world and I'm proud to have protected it.

    “The Road goes ever on and on Down from the door where it began.
    Now far ahead the Road has gone, I must follow if I can
    Posted 1 month ago #
  10. prairiedruid

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    Your words, your story, your life deserves to be remembered. And it will in the memories of those who have read this. I am moved and humbled by your service to this country. Thank you Banjo, and thank you to all the other forum members who have served.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  11. workman

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    That's a real story Fish. And a legacy. There is true drama in your narrative.

    Smoking is one of the leading causes of all statistics.
    Posted 1 month ago #
  12. anthonyrosenthal74

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    That's a real story Fish. And a legacy.
    It is indeed!

    Posted 1 month ago #
  13. elessar

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    A great story Fish! I too served in uniform and like you I am first generation born here. Currently I continue to serve as post commander of my local American Legion. I agree with some of the comments that some may have forgotten the meaning and reason we have a Memorial Day. In my duties with our Honor Guard we travel to 12 cemeteries and perform a memorial ceremony at each throughout the morning of Memorial Day. When we return to our post we have a formal ceremony. That ceremony begins with an invocation by our post chaplain. As I am new to this forum I hope I am not posting something inappropriate, but I would like to to share with you that invocation as I feel it conveys the gravity of the sacrifice made by so many.

    Almighty God, we are gathered here to honor our fallen dead. All who paid with their lives from one of the many devilish ways that man has contrived to maim or kill his fellow man; by bomb, bullet, shell, mine, fire, water, starvation, torture, disease. Some of them rest here; others at the ocean floor, others still are but the scattered ashes of plummeting human torches. We beseech Thee to care for all those who have closed their eyes thus, on the shadows and foggy twilight that makes up this world, and in Thy Mercy to enable them to open them on the full glory and warmth of Thee. For Thy Name’s sake. Amen.

    Posted 1 month ago #
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    headhunter

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    Great piece Banjo ! I too am a Viet Vet, 1st Infantry Divison 1LT Platoon Leader 68-69 with a rifle company. Mr. Orange has me also, lost my right kidney, had prostrate Cancer and diabetes. my son was born while I was there, I had 2 daughters after I was out of the Army, both have had reproductive problems I have associated with AO. The VA will laugh at you if you bring it up. I have never mentioned to either of them, only my wife. I pains me to talk or think too much about it ever after 50 years.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  15. mso489

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    Ship building is fundamental to national security. fish', your three-day fix on a one year project is astonishing. So often, you can't do what you would ordinarily expect to do, but you can do something in the time allotted so long as no one expects to sleep at all. A resonate lesson.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  16. fishnbanjo

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    Thank you all! mso489, my job was mainly a troubleshooter since I could come up with several plausible solutions on the fly, I’m fortunate the good lord gave me this ability. I think my most significant praise came from my CIO while we were at a meeting discussing Tricare delivery to Region 1 at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. We had an Air Force Major sort of making statements to each of the representatives (24 voting members of which I was one ). One thing she would say every so often was “you need to think out of the box”. I was just about finished with my input when she stood for her commentary when my CIO stood and said “Major, before you say it, I must tell you, in his world there are no boxes!” Regards.
    banjo

    Posted 1 month ago #
  17. ssjones

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    Thanks for your sacrifies Banjo, its important to keep these remembrances in our thoughts as we celebrate the fallen on Memorial Day. Like you, Memorial Day was a pensive one for my father. He too suffered the effects of agent orange, but fortunately, it was only restricted to nerve damage and he lived to an ripe old age. Arlington recently placed his headstone. We need to get down there and visit in person (this weekend is not the time to visit the DC area). Those to those who sacrificed it all for our country (and to all service persons, past & present). We had many decades of Memorial Day celebration with Pap, so we're grateful for that.


    Al

    Posted 1 month ago #
  18. mso489

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    I have the flag out, hopefully during daylight for the weekend, barring rain or some overt distraction. A few around here fly it all the time, others rarely or never. I always thought it was an important gesture of solidarity on national holidays. I fly it on Labor Day and Columbus Day. Issues aside, if it's national, it's national. Having served on a small ship in a combat zone with a true cross section of the U.S. population gives me an earned perspective, I hope. I'm a part of it all, but it ain't all about me.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  19. ssjones

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    Same here on the flag. We fly at every one of our restaurants. On Monday, Memorial Day, the flag should be flown at half staff from sunrise until noon, then raised briskly to the top of the staff until sunset in honor of the nation's battle heroes.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  20. ashdigger

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    Thank you to all.

    I fly the flag in my front yard 24/7. I also follow federal and state protocols for flying at 1/2 staff.

    Ubi Ignis Est?
    Posted 1 month ago #
  21. sablebrush52

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    Banjo, thank you for your post. I am reminded of the bravest person I have personally known, my oldest brother, Capt Harold Paul Silver, who served in Vietnam from '67 thru '69. He was stationed at Bien Hoa. He died 25 years ago of complications due to his exposure to Agent Orange. That's what his VA doctor put on his death certificate, despite being told not to.
    Hal came back from the war, resumed his life, and rarely spoke about his experiences there. He set up Mary Kay Cosmetics' western operations and did such a good job of it that he was transferred to Dallas where he moved rapidly up the ladder. He had a great marriage, financial success, what many would consider a model life.
    Then, one day while on his way to a board meeting, he had a seizure which was followed by several others. A mass was discovered under his brain but it hadn't coalesced enough to make surgery possible and it was months before his team felt that surgery was possible. But they also felt that his odds of surviving were small. He decided to have the surgery. Fortunately, the position of the tumor wasn't centered under his brain but off to one side and they were able to remove it with clean margins.
    An avid athlete who loved to play football, baseball, basketball and to surf, the operation left him unable to walk. And equally avid and congenial conversationalist, the surgery left Hal unable to speak.
    But Hal refused to give in and undertook a strenuous course of physical therapy that restored his ability to walk and he was able to learn to speak again.
    The strain of all of this took its toll on his marriage, but he remained good friends with Lynn for the rest of his life. Mary Kay wanted to keep him on payroll, but Hal didn't want charity and he tried to make a go of it with a couple of other companies before he decided that his impairment made it impossible to continue to meet the demands of business.
    Through all of this, and in the years that stretched ahead, filled with difficulties and ailments, he never lost his basically optimistic view of life. Hal saw each day as a gift, something to be enjoyed regardless of conditions. Hal felt that complaining wasted the gift, and he made the most of each and every day. Hal never complained about the hand that he had been dealt. There was no good purpose in doing so.
    I once asked him how he managed it. Hal's response was simple. Happiness was a choice, and he chose happiness. Hal looked forward to every day and found joy in a drive along the coast highway in his rag top, capped by a meal at his favorite greasy spoon. Hal enjoyed life on life's terms.
    I once joked with him that if he could find a way to bottle what he had, he would become the richest man on earth. He replied that he was the richest man on earth and had all that he needed.
    And that's why Hal remains for me the bravest person I've ever known, and why I'm grateful for this opportunity to tell a bit of his story.

    It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt. - Mark Twain

    It is pointless to argue with a fanatic since a dim bulb can't be converted into a searchlight. - Jesse Silver
    Posted 1 month ago #
  22. haparnold

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    For those who served, every day is memorial day for missing friends and comrades.

    True words. Memorial Day is a great solemn occasion to remember friends and brothers in arms who left this life too soon. They make me proud to wear the uniform.

    De Gustibus Non Est Disputandum
    Posted 1 month ago #
  23. anthonyrosenthal74

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    Sounds like your brother was a special man indeed, Jessie.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  24. jpmcwjr

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    Jesse- That is a lovely and very moving tribute. It helps me appreciate my life more. Thank you.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  25. jpmcwjr

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    Words worth repeating, but this was the strangest double post I've ever made. One key stoke for two posts! Usually it takes ignoring the green screen "Oops you moved to fast."

    Jesse- That is a lovely and very moving tribute. It helps me appreciate my life more. Thank you.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  26. mso489

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    Fine tribute to Capt. Harold Paul Silver who seems to have been as heroic as a civilian as he was in the service, or more so.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  27. seldom

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    Fishnbanjo served our country well. Thank you and RIP.

    Seldom Seen
    Posted 1 month ago #
  28. jpmcwjr

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    Good to bring up this thread. Here's banjo's last pipe:LINK to thread.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  29. hawky454

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    I’m glad y’all bumped this thread, some of the stories in here really brought tears to my eyes. I missed this thread the first go round but I’m glad I got a chance to read it.

    Posted 1 month ago #

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