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Interesting Completed Ebay Auctions - British Pipes

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  1. rdpowell

    rdpowell

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    Absolutely! But that will have to wait until I get back home on Tuesday. I have one from 1912, and it's one that I had to free up and remove the stuck tenon from the mortise. I don't remember if I re-glued that tenon or not, but if not, I'll unscrew it and give you pix of it on and off. It's not all that uncommon an occurrence. As for the thinness of the shank walls, I've got a couple of pipes from the 1920's with damned near tissue thin walls, and they're perfectly sound. I may throw in a picture or two of those. One is a Kaywoodie and the other is a Comoy.

    Great, I'll be looking forward to seeing that. And yes, I do agree there are some pipes out there with TOO thin of shanks as far as the size of the mortise to the side of the shank but, I don't believe it would have been standard practice by any means.

    Posted 11 months ago #
  2. pitchfork

    pitchfork

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    I can't speak to the Barling issue specifically, but thin mortises were pretty common back then. Here are two square-shanked BBB's of mine (one a straight bulldog and the other a bent billiard). The mortise of the bent billiard is cracked, but there was a flaw in the briar. The straight bulldog mortise (on the right) has some partial hairline cracks, but is otherwise still intact.

    Posted 11 months ago #
  3. georged

    georged

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    The stuck tenon was designed to screw onto the stem---and stay on the stem---so that the pipe came apart push-style in daily use.

    If the pipe had been designed to be screwed together, the extended portion of the stem would be bone---not naked amber (which is too 'snappy" unless reinforced---and the shank would have a small threaded hole directly in the wood.

    The wall thinness of the mortise isn't/wasn't a worry because the band reinforces it. And drilling wasn't a delicate operation because it was drilled first and shaped/thinned second.

    In short, as usual, Jesse knows his stuff.

    Dogs live such short lives... and spend most it waiting for us to come home
    Posted 11 months ago #
  4. rdpowell

    rdpowell

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    I can't speak to the Barling issue specifically, but thin mortises were pretty common back then. Here are two square-shanked BBB's of mine (one a straight bulldog and the other a bent billiard). The mortise of the bent billiard is cracked, but there was a flaw in the briar. The straight bulldog mortise (on the right) has some partial hairline cracks, but is otherwise still intact.

    Yes PF, I too have 1 or 2 that have very thin walls and are cracked. But, I think in the instance of Barling (if that is really a secondary tenon as said) they may have put a sleeve in the shank to make it easier to a line the (most likely) pre-made amber stem with bone screw tenon when tightened. This way they could tighten the sleeve onto the bone screw apply adhesive to the shank and insert it into the shank at the exact point to a line with the shank and, being the adhesive has not cured, will spin in the shank till they were happy with the fit. I do fairly the same thing when replacing a bone screw tenon just opposite. I tight the bone screw first into the shank and then apply adhesive to the mortise of the stem, tighten it till it's flush and a lined. Of course you can't be sloppy with the adhesive.
    But, this is my thought on it because I don't believe reputable manufactures like Barling are going to want pipes coming back because of faulty manufacturing practices nor a bad rep for themselves. This is just my feelings on it.

    Posted 11 months ago #
  5. rdpowell

    rdpowell

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    The stuck tenon was designed to screw onto the stem---and stay on the stem---so that the pipe came apart push-style in daily use.

    If the pipe had been designed to be screwed together, the extended portion of the stem would be bone---not naked amber (which is too 'snappy" unless reinforced---and the shank would have a small threaded hole directly in the wood.

    The wall thinness of the mortise isn't/wasn't a worry because the band reinforces it. And drilling wasn't a delicate operation because it was drilled first and shaped/thinned second.

    In short, as usual, Jesse knows his stuff. [:puffy:]

    Ah, But, it is a Bone Screw sir. Look at the photo on the previous page I posted.

    Posted 11 months ago #
  6. georged

    georged

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    Then you just time the screw itself, as was standard procedure for the period. No need to deal with extra labor, complexity, and components (fussy ones at that) to achieve the same end.

    Posted 11 months ago #
  7. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

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    Like I said, I'll post the tenon/amber assembly that Barling used during this period when I return on Tuesday. Simply put - because I have fixed this problem and have actual experience with this, and collect Barlings from this period as well as other periods, a collection spanning a century - that is a vulcanite tenon stuck in the mortise. It has become unscrewed from its connector which in turn attached the vulcanite tenon to an amber stem. Whether that is a bone connector or not I can't tell, and it doesn't matter, but I can tell you that the connector doesn't look like any Barling bone connector that i've seen that was intended as the sole connector. And I'll show you what that obsolete joinery looked like since I have an 1896 Barling pipe made for JB that has a bone connector intended as the only connector. George is correct.

    Then if you all want to continue to debate this, have at it but I'll be done with it. Life's too short.

    It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt. - Mark Twain

    It is pointless to argue with a fanatic since a dim bulb can't be converted into a searchlight. - Jesse Silver
    Posted 11 months ago #
  8. rdpowell

    rdpowell

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    Jesse, I understand, I just have a hard time with it, doesn't make sense to me and I certainly don't want to make this a big debate either sir. Hopefully your photo's will clear this up for me. And thank you for taking the time to provide them for me.

    Posted 11 months ago #
  9. ssjones

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    I thought this one would be fun to pick up at $50-couple bucks....
    https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.com%2Fulk%2Fitm%2F273248061898

    Al

    Posted 11 months ago #
  10. dmcmtk

    dmcmtk

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    I thought this one would be fun to pick up at $50-couple bucks....

    Al, I had that one in my watch list, I didn't check the final price!

    Dave
    Duke Street Irregular
    Posted 11 months ago #
  11. wyfbane

    wyfbane

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    I have always loved Charatans, and lately have been going through a bulldog phase. I saw this auction for a 38 and it went reasonable. I jumped.

    Charatan 38 auction

    Posted 11 months ago #
  12. dmcmtk

    dmcmtk

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    wyfbane, nice looking Special.

    Posted 11 months ago #
  13. wyfbane

    wyfbane

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    Thank you! Yet another stem to polish tho... ha ha

    Posted 11 months ago #
  14. kenbarnes

    kenbarnes

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    I love this cased Barling Bulldog (made for John Brumfit, Holborn, London). Yes, the tenon sleeve remains in the countersink. I think this happened quite often as people were used to unscrewing the bone thread anti-clockwise whilst this newer approach required the smoker to detach the push-in tenon by turning it clockwise. I adore this hand-cut amber mouthpiece. This pipe, in my opinion, had many hours spent on it as well as hand-cutting the case from a block of wood. I do know that at this time, Weingot and Brumfit were the top shops to sell to in London and the manufactures 'favourites'.

    The Charatan that wyfbane purchased is a great exmaple of a 38 Bulldog. I think this one is quite early (mid 1960s?) as later on they were fitted with a DC mouthpiece (as I recall).

    Posted 11 months ago #
  15. jaytex969

    jaytex969

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    I just watched this 7 pipe "set" jump $900 in the last 20 seconds...

    LINK

    Gunner, Black Frigate. Say "Hello" to my little friend!
    Posted 11 months ago #
  16. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    Posted 11 months ago #
  17. bnichols23

    Bill Nichols

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    I can believe that, Jay. My case of fleabay fever isn't as bad as some,thank the pipe gods, but I know I've got a terminal case of it....

    Head Black Frigate keelhauler, boss powder monkey, & troublemaker 1st class.
    Posted 11 months ago #
  18. ssjones

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    I don't see too many Ashton sets, and even less early ones, but this final surprised me a bit (one was unsmoked).
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/ASHTON-MATCHED-CASED-SET-1989-ONE-UNSMOKED-amp-ONE-MINT-/382482714485?nordt=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557&nma=true&si=y%252BVXX6waNmnkLxc2ucK3KoNfMMk%253D&orig_cvip=true

    Posted 11 months ago #
  19. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

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    Arrived home this afternoon and, as promised, here are images that I hope will explain what I was writing about with regard to the tenon of the 1910 Barling being stuck in the mortise.

    Here's the picture of the pipe in question:

    You can clearly see a circular object centered in the shank. The amber stem has a threaded connector extending from it. Were the tenon not stuck in the shank, the stem assembly would look like this:

    Barling used a threaded connector to attach a vulcanite tenon to the amber stem. When I originally bought this pipe, the tenon was stuck in the mortise and I released it, cleaned it and the mortise, and screwed the tenon back onto the threaded connector. I would have unscrewed it to take another picture, but it didn't want to budge and I'm not going to force it. It seems to be happy to be back in place.

    The reason for this construction was to provide a stronger and more durable join than either using an amber tenon or a bone tenon, both of which are fragile. Barling was pretty early in using this solution at a time when other makers were still using bone screw connectors. Vulcanite has more tensile strength than amber, which is brittle. This pipe dates to 1912. Here's a picture of the pipe:

    It's a nice looking pipe with very fine straight grain going 360˚ around the bowl.

    Besides, who in their right mind would deliberately cut a bone connector, as the sole connector, that looked like the one showing on the 1910 pipe? All those threads? You would be turning and turning and turning the stem many many times to get it seated. That's a lot of stress to apply repeatedly to a fragile connector.

    So what would an actual bone connector have looked like? Well here's an earlier Barling from 1896, coincidentally also made for JB, and it has a bone connector that is quite similar to many others that I've seen.

    Here are a couple pictures of the pipe:

    And here's the pipe with the stem removed so that you can see the bone connector. It's threaded only at the base, where it also widens out to be a bit thicker and stronger. The tapering makes it easy to insert into the mortise. A few turns and it's seated.

    I hope that this helps clarify things.

    Posted 11 months ago #
  20. rdpowell

    rdpowell

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    I see what your saying, just seems to be double the work and cost to use such a construction of a tenon when it would have been a lot easier to just cut a Vulcanite tenon in the first place (and not so large of a diameter). Not disagreeing, I just don't understand their thinking. Reckon I'll have to research this too, although I doubt if Barling left any records about this. Thank you for taking the time and effort to show me this Jesse.

    Posted 11 months ago #
  21. bnichols23

    Bill Nichols

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    Ditto on the thanks here, Jesse. I always learn at least one something from you. Wisdom from the Bard of the Mountain!

    Posted 11 months ago #
  22. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

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    I'm not sure what they could have done differently. Two very different materials are being conjoined. Vulcanite has tensile strength that allows it to give in a way that's the opposite of brittle amber and therefore more suited to being rotated into the wooden mortise. I suppose they could have countersunk the vulcanite tenon into the amber and glued it in place, but that wouldn't have insulated the amber from stresses on the vulcanite and might very well have led to more structural failures in the amber. The threaded connector is a better join from the standpoint of isolating the amber.

    As far as records, much of the Barling records were destroyed when the factories were bombed during the Blitz. What we have is largely the fossil record provided by the pipes.

    Posted 11 months ago #
  23. carolinachurchwarden

    carolinachurchwarden

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    From what I see, I don't understand why they didn't just go ahead and make the tenon push type out of vulcanite in the first place then. Unless they were just trying to give the stem that amber look, in which case, vulcanite would be out the window as far as aesthetics are concerned. Looks to me like they could have just seated the vulcanite tenon portion up inside the amber and secured it that way, but I see how they could have even tried that method and decided threading it in made for a better connection. Just so hard to know what their methodology was back then since it's not like they all kept the most meticulous records of everything they tried that didn't work.

    "If you can't send money, send tobacco." - George Washington

    Posted 11 months ago #
  24. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    Great illustrations, Jesse. (I believed you the first time!)

    Posted 11 months ago #
  25. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

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    From what I see, I don't understand why they didn't just go ahead and make the tenon push type out of vulcanite in the first place then.

    They did make the tenon out of vulcanite. That's what I'm showing in the picture - a vulcanite tenon attached to an amber stem.

    Unless they were just trying to give the stem that amber look, in which case, vulcanite would be out the window as far as aesthetics are concerned.

    Amber stems were very much the rage at the time these pipes were made. And we're not talking about amberoid or some synthetic version. That was largely used for the cheap crap. We're talking about actual real amber. But the amber that was used was, unlike a lot of amber, quite brittle and subject to chipping or breaking if not handled with care. So the folks at Barling were trying to come up with a way to use the best material for the specific function. In this instance, using a vulcanite tenon, which has more flex and give, to make the tenon, which has to handle shearing forces against the inside of the mortise as well as providing a more durable attachment than bone connectors of the era provided.

    Looks to me like they could have just seated the vulcanite tenon portion up inside the amber and secured it that way, but I see how they could have even tried that method and decided threading it in made for a better connection.

    Correct. That's what they did. The vulcanite tenon cap also provides a shield against shearing forces torquing the connector, when butted up against the face of the amber stem. Countersinking the tenon into the amber stem would have exposed a larger face of the amber to the shearing forces. Yep, no engineering in making pipes...

    Just so hard to know what their methodology was back then since it's not like they all kept the most meticulous records of everything they tried that didn't work.

    We don't know much because the records were largely destroyed. But they, and others, clearly had a methodology for achieving what they wanted, one that could be passed on. We do know that Barling were always looking for better designs as evidenced by the surviving patents for various bit, filter, and system designs that were, or weren't, actually put into production. They were inventive little buggers.

    Posted 11 months ago #
  26. dmcmtk

    dmcmtk

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    And now you have "the rest of the story".

    Posted 11 months ago #
  27. georged

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    Nothing wasteful or mysterious going on here. Real amber was once King of the Pipeworld when it came to social status (luxury goods identifiable from a distance); and push tenons were the coming thing---easier to use than a screw, plus free of timing problems.

    Someone at Barling decided to make a pipe that offered both features simultaneously. The end.

    That the design had an inherent weakness---the tenon would get stuck and people unscrewed the stem from it---was discovered only with extended use.

    Posted 11 months ago #
  28. ssjones

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    Here's an unusual set, advertised as a 1920's Sasieni set.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/-/332724776640?nordt=true&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l10137

    Includes a "Temple Bar" model, I don't recall ever seeing that pipe. That would appear to be 1920's.

    The "Hunt" bent billiard is a mystery. It is appealingly tiny! The button looks out of place to my eye.
    And it certainly has been smoked.

    Posted 10 months ago #
  29. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    Ouch! Way under exposed images that he bumped up the shadows in PS by 3-4 stops. No detail in the paper towel- sad, sad! But the pipe loses detail, too.

    Posted 10 months ago #
  30. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    This was posted 6-9 months ago, and it raises a big question.

    Are these Barlings heavily refinished? As in coats of thick varnish or shellac? The nature of the highlights seems to indicate that to me, but bigger Barling and photography experts' opinions are wanted....If the reflections don't indicate that, what causes them to not have smoother edges?

    Posted 10 months ago #
  31. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

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    Are these Barlings heavily refinished? As in coats of thick varnish or shellac? The nature of the highlights seems to indicate that to me, but bigger Barling and photography experts' opinions are wanted....If the reflections don't indicate that, what causes them to not have smoother edges?

    I knew the seller. These pipes belonged to her father, who coated all of his pipes with some kind of oil, possibly mineral oil. I suggested that she clean the oil off, but she didn't.

    Posted 10 months ago #
  32. snagstangl

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    https://www.ebay.com/itm/-/132714317456?nordt=true&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l10137

    Unsmoked merchant Service ended at $520. I thought it would go for more considering the stupid prices stuff has brought lately.

    Posted 10 months ago #
  33. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

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    Two bidders locked in a duel, one of whom buys all kinds of crap, is a good recipe for a high price.

    Posted 10 months ago #
  34. ssjones

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    This pipe has it's own thread here, an unusual shape number (498, should be 499?) and Blue Riband stamping. The oddities didn't help the final price it seems.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/-/113158075599?nordt=true&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l10137

    Posted 9 months ago #
  35. ssjones

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    Another fun auction, for an unsmoked Ashton Magnum. Two heavy hitters made swings for the fence in the final minute, doubling the standing bid. I wonder if we'll see this one in Rich Esserman's next article for The Pipe Collector?

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/-/372364030415?nordt=true&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l10137

    Posted 9 months ago #
  36. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

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    Gotta love those last second stratospheric snipes. So rewarding to the seller. One of the heavy hitters is more a generalist than a pipe collector, another typical ingredient in spectacular final prices.

    Posted 9 months ago #
  37. irishearl

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    I admit I don't peruse the estate market much, but the final bid on that magnum was ridiculous.

    Posted 9 months ago #
  38. bluegrassbrian

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    Yowza. Unsmoked for over 30 years.. it was worth it for someone.
    Makes me glad I only smoke smaller pipes.

    Tobacco's a help because it clears the mind
    But like all your friends it is vilified
    They always say, the right amount's fine
    Posted 9 months ago #
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    I've had four Ashton Magnum, and sold them all. Although it was 15 yrs ago or so, and Bill was still alive, I was only able to get about $500 each at the Richmond Pipe Show. By that time Bill had quit making Magnums because they were not selling in the US. Bill had about a dozen boxes of unfinished Magnums just sitting around the shop, and I picked out some nice ones and he finished them off for me. Believe it or not, I paid less than $150 per pipe. Those were good days with a fine man.

    Posted 9 months ago #
  40. dmcmtk

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    I'd say a fair price (if not a little high) for Blue Riband 498. The grain completely falls apart on the right hand side of the pipe, the left hand side is only "ok". The finish looks a little "off" for a BR, I would tend to question the level of its originality.

    Posted 9 months ago #
  41. ssjones

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    @ Hagley - you hung out with Bill at his shop? That sounds like a thread starter to me!

    Posted 9 months ago #
  42. ssjones

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    Unsmoked, bone tenon GBD (advertise as from 1877 to 1900). A 2nd one was just listed, also unsmoked.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/-/362381796652?nordt=true&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l10137

    Posted 9 months ago #
  43. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

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    From John Fabris' collection. One of my favorite experiences was an afternoon I spent at John's home, looking at one amazing piece of history after another. The most astonishing pipe collection I will ever see.

    Posted 9 months ago #
  44. bluegrassbrian

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    Al, that GBD broke my heart.
    I was going to bid on it, forgot about it until about 2 minutes after it closed.

    Posted 9 months ago #
  45. snagstangl

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  46. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    And here they are:

    "Judd's Lot of 3 Briar Pipe Bowls - Dunhill Comoy's Blue Riband & Barling's"

    Posted 9 months ago #
  47. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

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    Might not be the worst deal. The winner could have hand made stems made and for about $500 he'll have three nice pipes. The Dunhill patent is an early one and the blast is pretty crisp. The rims on all three bowls look very clean.

    Posted 9 months ago #
  48. sablebrush52

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    There have been some stellar auctions of museum quality pipes on eBay in the past couple of weeks, due to the auctioning off of John Fabris' collection. John's may have been the finest collection of 19th and 20th century pipes ever assembled.

    Here's a particularly rare BBB. It's a magnum, listed as a churchwarden. It did reasonably well in auction. Imgur is having some issues with uploading, so you will have be content with the link.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/ENGLISH-ESTATE-PIPE-BBB-11-LONG-BULLDOG-CHURCHWARDEN-c-1900-/362403151428?nordt=true&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.m43663.l10137

    The condition is really fine. The only issue I can see is the stuck push tenon that has become disconnected from its stem. This is a not uncommon problem with very old pipes. The connecting screw is protruding from the shank.

    There are a number of superb Brit pipes up for auction on the Bay.

    Posted 8 months ago #
  49. jpmcwjr

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    This photo is from the eBay site.

    Imgur is up and working as of a half hour ago.

    Posted 8 months ago #
  50. ssjones

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    I never quite acclimated to this one, so I sold it on Ebay as a BIN. Treasurepipes picked up, reworked the bowl top, and and made it a quick flip. This one could have already been topped previously, so I never wanted to take any more off.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/SASIENI-HENDON-FISH-TALE-LOGO-PATENT-PIPE-SQUAT-BULLDOG/382548626235

    Posted 8 months ago #
  51. jpmcwjr

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    Was the stem rounded off where it joins the shank, or is that an artifact of the photo?

    Posted 8 months ago #
  52. sablebrush52

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    Was the stem rounded off where it joins the shank, or is that an artifact of the photo?

    It's an artifact of using a buffer as a weapon of pipe destruction. The stem was removed for buffing separately, possibly to remove oxidation. It's a rookie move. This invariably results in rounding of the edges where it meets the shank.

    Posted 8 months ago #
  53. ssjones

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    @jcpmcwjr - that's not the pipe from the link above. Now, on closed Ebay auctions, it gives you an active auction, versus the one no longer available.

    That One Dot does look abused!

    Here's the Hendon Four Dot.

    Posted 8 months ago #
  54. jpmcwjr

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    Another view.

    I saw the Sasieni above and had a question, but no, it wasn't the one you referred to.

    Posted 8 months ago #
  55. ssjones

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    Bowl top when I sold it.

    Posted 8 months ago #
  56. sablebrush52

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    I can see why you think the pipe has been further topped. Not only does the rim's edge appear to be visibly crisper, the grain pattern has shifted slightly at about 2:30.

    Posted 8 months ago #
  57. dmcmtk

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    What a Hendon should look like pre-surgery,

    Sasieni never made a pipe with a rim that thick!

    Posted 8 months ago #
  58. sablebrush52

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    It's been a very good week for eBay auctions on British pipes. Consider the following:

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/LOEWE-L-Co-CASED-SILVER-MOUNTED-READING-PIPE-BONE-1895-/302855734348?nordt=true&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.m43663.l10137

    It's a very nice cased library pipe that ended in a very spectacular price for this brand, $1400. I have to admit that I was quite surprised and I took a peek at the bid history. As expected, an iceberg was waiting for the Titanic to hit it. I sure hope that the sniper is serious about the last second bid he made, since the pipe jumped about $1000 after he made it. Another example of why last second sniping in the stratosphere is not the brightest strategy. Unless, of course, the bidder really thinks that the object is really worth all that moolah to him.

    Posted 8 months ago #
  59. sablebrush52

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    Nest up is this cased BBB library pipe with albatross bone extension:

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/BBB-CASED-EARLY-SILVER-MOUNTED-ALBATROSS-BONE-READING-PIPE-/302855726714?nordt=true&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.m43663.l10137

    The final price seems more in line with market values. I just wonder if the winner was aware that the albatross extension is split. BTW, the winner is the same bidder who paid $1400 for the Loewe above.

    Once again, two bidders make financially stratospheric snipes, colliding at the last second, sending the price up about $630 in that last second.

    Fun times!

    Posted 8 months ago #
  60. ashdigger

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    Not to mention the 7 day cased set is back. Refusing to pay is always a problem with stratospheric bidding.

    Ubi Ignis Est?
    Posted 8 months ago #
  61. sablebrush52

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    Last but not lease, a very nice example of a Barling 249. I have one of these and it's a superb smoking pipe. Just love it.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/BARLINGS-MAKE-249-EXEL-EBWB-SILVER-MOUNTED-PIPE-PRE-TRANSITION-/302855860716?nordt=true&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.m43663.l10137

    The final price is in line with other auctions of this model, in this condition, that I've followed on eBay. I like this price. It's almost twice what I paid for mine, and mine is a higher grade.

    Posted 8 months ago #
  62. jpmcwjr

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    Holy underexposed photos! Must have been shot at least 3 stops under, pushed back up in post so some detail of grain is shown. A bit over 400 clams.

    Posted 8 months ago #
  63. sablebrush52

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    Not to mention the 7 day cased set is back. Refusing to pay is always a problem with stratospheric bidding.

    Yes, and eBay doesn't penalize them for breaking their contract. Really, these guys who refuse to honor their commitments should be banned, at least for a few months if not for good.

    Posted 8 months ago #
  64. User has not uploaded an avatar

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    Interesting Dunhill. I'm no expert, but something felt just a bit off.

    ebay Dunhill

    Posted 8 months ago #
  65. jpmcwjr

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    This one? Looks like it spent a decade a the bottom of a creek. And, and, and. Is there anything right about this one?

    Once your photos are on a photo hosting site (such as Imgur.com; Postimage; Dropbox, etc. Photobucket), or on virtually any site, (including this site's album) such as eBay, Amazon, you-name-it, select the full sized image, then Control-click (Mac) or Right-click (Windows) on the image itself, then choose "copy image location" or similar words. Now paste that URL (the full web address, which should end in .jpg or .png) into the IMG box in the reply window of the thread you're posting to.

    Posted 8 months ago #
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    osiris01

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    Yes, that one. Sorry, I didn't post the image because it has been relisted. I love the splinter hanging off the shank/stem. Apologies for lowering the tone of the thread, but it did make me laugh. Can't see a white dot!

    Posted 8 months ago #
  67. georged

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  68. sablebrush52

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    Here's the Loewe set:

    It is a beauty!

    John had the most fabulous collection I've ever seen.

    Posted 8 months ago #
  69. snagstangl

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    https://www.ebay.com/itm/1919-Silver-039-BARLINGS-MAKE-039-amp-a-Barling-TVF-2-Estate-Pipes-for-Bowl-Repair-/253864550169?_trksid=p2047675.l2557&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&nma=true&si=Haa%252BwIex05WBsjtoDtjZ8jz8EIw%253D&orig_cvip=true&nordt=true&rt=nc

    I figured I would be ahead, even if I had to top it significantly. I wanted a strongly bent barling, but finding one that doesnt go into the stratosphere. I wanted a smoker, which i think i can make this one. The stem doesn't have the barling cross on it but , the tenon looks alot like the one added to the amber stem in posts months ago.

    Posted 8 months ago #
  70. peckinpahhombre

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    Not an auction, but a very hefty BIN for this interesting Barling meer with silver cap:

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/ENGLISH-ESTATE-PIPE-BARLING-MEERSCHAUM-w-AMBER-SILVER-DOMED-WINDCAP-1909/372423955495?hash=item56b6329427:g:RRMAAOSwXl9bdu5t:sc:USPSPriority!14092!US!-1

    Posted 8 months ago #

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