Pipes Magazine » Pipe Talk

Search Forums  
   
Tags:  No tags yet. 

Estate Pipe Collectors

(50 posts)
  • Started 5 months ago by mikethompson
  • Latest reply from gatorlope
  1. mikethompson

    mikethompson

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2016
    Posts: 3,780

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I was browsing ebay and the usual suspects this morning, and I thought about the appeal of estate pipes, more specifically, older estate pipes. There is a certain draw to me to an older pipe, a pipe decades older than myself. Part of what gets me interested in these old pipes is imagining the life they had before me, and the stories they could tell. But another part of me likes estates because they are so much cheaper than new.

    So for you guys that have estates in your rotation, is the appeal to you more financial or nostalgic/romantic?

    Posted 5 months ago #
  2. danielplainview

    dave g

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2014
    Posts: 2,940

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Nostalgia for sure.

    They don’t make em like they use to.

    Make aromatics great again.
    Posted 5 months ago #
  3. davet

    davet

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2015
    Posts: 3,807

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Newer estates for the value but older, much older estates for the rarity / nostalgia and like dave g says

    They don’t make em like they use to.

    I prefer the older estates

    Posted 5 months ago #
  4. scloyd

    scloyd

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2018
    Posts: 1,675

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I have five estates that I picked up cheap at local antique shops. They're all in good condition and I've cleaned them and removed some chatter. I still need to polish them. I haven't smoked any of them yet but I do like the nostalgia of them.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  5. haparnold

    Hap

    Senior Member
    Joined: Aug 2018
    Posts: 967

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Nostalgia + Economy. A perfect combination in my book!

    De Gustibus Non Est Disputandum
    Posted 5 months ago #
  6. saltedplug

    saltedplug

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2016
    Posts: 1,913

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I used to think of estates as doubling my money. I couldn't afford new what quality I wanted, but estate I could. This culminated in a Savinelli autograph blast, group 5 or 6, with a wonderfully shaped, elongate bowl for which I paid ~$250.00.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  7. judcasper

    judcasper

    Senior Member
    Joined: Jan 2019
    Posts: 306

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I'm still waiting to pick up my first estate, but they're extremely thin on the ground in my part of the world. On the rare occasion I find a likely establishment and go in to ask, I always get the same response: "Pipes?? Nooo, we never get any pipes in I'm afraid."

    There's ebay, of course, but even the estates on there tend to be out of my price range.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  8. raevans

    raevans

    Member
    Joined: Apr 2013
    Posts: 273

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    the appeal to you more financial or nostalgic/romantic

    Yes to all. But as of late when I pick-up an estate, it's more about pipes that will never be produced again either because the pipe maker is no longer with us or has retired. My last few finds have been a Sam Learned horn series, a Bob Hayes panel, a Clarence Mickles full bent, and one that is on its way, Steve Weiner blast.

    I knew all of these makers, sat next to them and shot the shit at many a pipe show. Now when I see one of there creations it's hard to resist. So financial yes, but maybe a bit more towards nostalgic/romantic.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  9. seanv

    seanv

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 913

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I agree with everything mike has in his first post. I would love to own a pre ww1 pipe. I cannot even begin to imagine the life that thing would have seen.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  10. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2015
    Posts: 13,355

    online

    Login to Send PM

    Value; all ready broken in; nostalgia for me.

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    Posted 5 months ago #
  11. pappymac

    pappymac

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2015
    Posts: 1,832

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    In my opinion:

    A technical definition of estate pipe, is a pipe which previously belonged to someone else and is sold as part of that persons estate after they have died.

    I call them "Rescued Pipes" because I have rescued them from places like flea markets, street fairs and antique shops and malls. At one time I was just buying old pipes because I was teaching myself how to restore pipes and didn't want to practice on anything valuable. Now a pipe has to be either really old or something that wasn't sold in a drugstore. I have passed on a number of Dr. Grabow's being sold and priced as antiques because I can still find Dr. Grabows at some of the local drugstores.

    My latest finds were a Preben Holms and two Ben Wades that were carved during the Preben Holms era.

    I am glad we have a good admin and responsible moderators.

    Heave to you dark colored ship under sail! Prepare to be boarded!
    Posted 5 months ago #
  12. scloyd

    scloyd

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2018
    Posts: 1,675

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    At one time I was just buying old pipes because I was teaching myself how to restore pipes and didn't want to practice on anything valuable.

    This is me now. I don't mind spending $5-$10 on estate pipes from antique shops to "practice" my restoration skills.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  13. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2015
    Posts: 13,355

    online

    Login to Send PM

    A technical definition of estate pipe, is a pipe which previously belonged to someone else and is sold as part of that persons estate after they have died.

    True dat. Unfortunately, it now seems to mean any pipe that has been previously owned, smoked or unsmoked. I'd guess half of my pipes fall into that category.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  14. rdavid

    Panhandler

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2018
    Posts: 679

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    It’s kinda funny because as a fairly new piper, I was always turned away from estates. Smoking somebody else’s previously owned pipe just didn’t appeal to me at all.

    Now that I own a couple, it’s amazing how my attitude has changed. I always wonder who owned it prior to me and what it’s been through etc. I actually ordered a Savinelli Punto Oro Gold estate by accident thinking it was new until I got it. I noticed the chamber was darkened from smoking and went back to check my order. Sure enough, I did order an estate. Also saved a bunch as I compared it to a new one. This pipe literally looks brand new except for the slight chamber darkening and I’d be surprised if this was smoked more than once. Makes me think the previous owner tried pipes and didn’t like them? Who knows but the wondering always adds to the experience.

    Now I have a pre transition Barling’s Make on the way and will be my first attempt at a very careful restoration. Can’t wait!

    "May my last breath be drawn through a pipe, and exhaled in a jest." Charles Lamb
    Posted 5 months ago #
  15. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

    The Bard Of Barlings
    Joined: Jun 2013
    Posts: 9,650

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Initially it was simply a matter of economics. Buying an estate pipe cost far less than buying a new one. While I occasionally splurged on a lower end new pipe I could buy a higher graded used pipe for about the same money. As I became more knowledgeable about pipes I grew to appreciate estates for more than their price point and began to see their value. Price and value are very different things.

    I became interested in the history attached to pipes and tobaccos, which eventually led to me collecting, in an extremely modest fashion, Barlings and other fine Britwood. Perhaps there is a little bit of appreciation of the romance of it, old wood, Algerian briar, etc, etc. I certainly love the older shapings and stylings. Not much in the way of nostalgia as I'm not of the rose colored glasses sort.

    I've certainly been rewarded with many hours of pleasure at hunting down information, taking dips in the river and trying to make connections. And I've met some kindred spirits along the way, and that's been priceless.

    I'm pretty much done with the buying, both in pipes and tobaccos. I'm still looking for clues and will probably do one more revision to my Pipedia article. It's time to get rid of stuff, not accumulate more.

    It's little bits of history like this:

    that you can only find with estate pipes.

    It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt. - Mark Twain

    It is pointless to argue with a fanatic since a dim bulb can't be converted into a searchlight. - Jesse Silver
    Posted 5 months ago #
  16. mikethompson

    mikethompson

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2016
    Posts: 3,780

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Nice replies so far, I think we are all in the same boat.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  17. newbroom

    newbroom

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2014
    Posts: 5,590

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Initially, pipe smoking was about my eliminating paper while I used tobacco. Once I got started and began to investigate the subject, I became enthralled with learning and trying out new stuff. I had only dabbled with ebay previously, but, once I began to 'win' pipe auctions, my 'collection' was off and running.
    That my new hobby coincided nicely with my retirement, this became a favorite pastime.
    I haven't bought a pipe in more than a year, and don't plan to either. In fact, I will be divesting of many if possible.
    I would be quite happy with a few MM Prides.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  18. tschiraldi

    tschiraldi

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2015
    Posts: 1,167

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    For me, it's quality. I think the Brits of old really knew how to hand make a pipe. Great Briar, beautiful shaping, a perfect draw, and the comfort of hand made ebonite stems (or comfortable acrylic from Castello). The history is also a draw for me. I love the stories about the old shops and their origins and progressions.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  19. User has not uploaded an avatar

    hoppes

    Member
    Joined: Mar 2017
    Posts: 136

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I began smoking a pipe in college many years ago. Had only one pipe since I couldn't afford more than that at the time. Over the years I managed to find 45-50 pipes that included Castello's, Ascorti's, Barlings,Dunhills, Savinelli's' Petersons, etc.You could find them in various stores and websites for very low prices compared to today. 2-3 years ago I dragged out the collection since I had given up pipes for many years. They weren't being used so sold the entire collection.Unfortunately, I found I didn't have a hobby particularly during the cold, rainy months of winter when one cannot get outside. So, I started buying the worst condition pipes I could find and learned how to resuscitate them. I love to work with my hands especially with a beautiful piece of old briar. It is very satisfying to recreate a 50-60 year old pipe and bring it back to life. I now have another 50 or so pipes that have been resurrected-- a good number of which are not well known. I need to get rid of about 40 of them and start the cycle over. The other thing I love is the history that one can learn from research and the experts on this site. It also allows one to find the pipes that suit ones taste and gives the best smoke. Nice hobby to have ! Hoppes
    Here's a History Question: Do you remember this pipe? OK, who's the gentleman in the picture?




    Very good!

    Posted 5 months ago #
  20. pianopuffer

    pianopuffer

    Senior Member
    Joined: Jul 2017
    Posts: 419

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I love the estate market. Either a flea market find that needs some TLC or a cleaned and ready to go pipe on SP or other online vendors, they're all good in my book.

    The added bonus is the history that these pipes bring with them. The stories they could tell!

    Posted 5 months ago #
  21. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

    The Bard Of Barlings
    Joined: Jun 2013
    Posts: 9,650

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    OK, who's the gentleman in the picture?

    Looks like George C Marshall

    Posted 5 months ago #
  22. mikethompson

    mikethompson

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2016
    Posts: 3,780

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I like that the poster suggests pipes based on the size and shape of your face.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  23. chasingembers

    Embers

    Captain Of The Black Frigate
    Joined: Nov 2014
    Posts: 15,430

    online

    Login to Send PM

    Neither financial, nostalgic, or romantic. After cleaning them up, no break in period.

    Damnation seize my soul if I give you quarters, or take any from you.
    -Edward Teach
    Posted 5 months ago #
  24. mtwaller

    mtwaller

    Senior Member
    Joined: Nov 2018
    Posts: 338

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Estates are definitely nostalgic for me. I only have one, a Barling from the early-mid 60’s. I won’t lie, it was cheap which is great. But I’m a history buff and it’s humbling to interact with or own objects that have already lived previous lives. It gives you a sense of perspective on the fleeting nature of the here and now, thinking about somebody else being a young man or woman half a century ago on another continent, smoking the very pipe you hold in your hands now. That’s why I like them, anyway. To each their own.

    “There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the proportion”.
    Posted 5 months ago #
  25. User has not uploaded an avatar

    bent1

    Member
    Joined: Jan 2015
    Posts: 239

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I like the sizing & classical shapes of pipes from 20”s or 1960’s.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  26. mikethompson

    mikethompson

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2016
    Posts: 3,780

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    But I’m a history buff and it’s humbling to interact with or own objects that have already lived previous lives. It gives you a sense of perspective on the fleeting nature of the here and now, thinking about somebody else being a young man or woman half a century ago on another continent, smoking the very pipe you hold in your hands now.

    Well said. Then I think about the pipes that I have bought new and where they will end up in 60 or 70 plus years.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  27. addamsruspipe

    addamsruspipe

    Senior Member
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 384

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    My first pipe and first estate pipe belonged to my wife's father. It went from Santa Fe to San Francisco to Hawaii to Korea and back again during the Korean war. Every estate pipe I get I spend a little time wondering who owned it and the travels it has made.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  28. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 18,163

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I collect estate pipes, because I am in to finding and collecting rare diseases, and pipes are great for that, because the tobacco tars help mutate diseases and germs into super powered invisible death machines. Of course, after I have taken my samples from the pipes, I toss the pipes in the garbage. I wouldn't want anyone actually putting one of them things in their mouths.
    JK

    Michael
    Posted 5 months ago #
  29. rdavid

    Panhandler

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2018
    Posts: 679

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Well said. Then I think about the pipes that I have bought new and where they will end up in 60 or 70 plus years.

    I do think of this often myself. Might just do what Cosmic is going to do with his collection... Leave a couple behind for family and/friends then burn the rest with me!

    Posted 5 months ago #
  30. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 18,163

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Posted 5 months ago #
  31. bnichols23

    Bill Nichols

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 2,593

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    On the guy in the pic, definitely George C. Marshall. Quite a guy; very few more highly respected in the dot-mil community.

    appeal to you more financial or nostalgic/romantic

    Both. (And you thought you wouldn't get a straight answer out of me!) Tschiraldi's got it right on quality too, esp. when it comes to GBDs/Comoys. BITD pre-Cadogan other than those two there were no finer British pipes other than BBB & Barling. (And yes, I *deliberately* EXclude D*nh*ll, even though I had one.) But back to the query...

    A lot I buy for bang for the buck, but some I definitely do for nostalgia. In particular there was a Hilson Unicorn I couldn't believe my luck on. It just popped up when I was hunting for something else, & is EXACTLY like one I had when I worked for Tinder Box in the '70s. I had to bid to $75 but it was worth every cent to me to get the thing "back." I'd given the old one to a new smoker in the 80s & regretted it ever since. It was & IS one of my most favorite smokes.

    And a double-plus on what pappy said re Preben Holms & PH-era Ben Wades. Yeah, everybody knows about my thing for PHs, but I've got 3 of his & counting, *plus* 5-6 Ben Wades I could never have afforded back then. Living in the past? You bet, & lovin' every rising-smoke minute of it!

    Head Black Frigate keelhauler, boss powder monkey, & troublemaker 1st class.
    Posted 5 months ago #
  32. bnichols23

    Bill Nichols

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 2,593

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    wouldn't want anyone actually putting one of them things in their mouths

    Nut.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  33. crashthegrey

    crashthegrey

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2015
    Posts: 2,830

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Combination nostalgia and function. I have many Kaywoodie estates. My first from the thirties made me realize how nicely aged briar well broken in smokes. So while I have some for nostalgia just to have all different sorts of Kaywoodie pipes, I also look for those which are made prior to 1950 especially, as they just smoke so nicely.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  34. puffermark

    puffermark

    Junior Member
    Joined: Feb 2015
    Posts: 81

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    When I started smoking pipes again after a long hiatus (about 4-5 years ago) I bought a new Stanwell. On an absolute whim, I searched a local auction site for smoking pipes and scored an estate little pre-republic Pete. In researching it, I discovered forums such as this, and the fact that it dated to 1947 - 1949. I was intrigued with the history and the rest is, well. . . history. A new hobby was born. I love researching manufacturers, dating etc.

    I now have a collection of about 60-odd, of which 80%+ are estates. Oldest is an 1898 silver mounted Charles Maas Ooom Paul. A huge thing, it's one of my best smokers.

    So yep, history, nostalgia, often no break-in and best of all value for $.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  35. mtwaller

    mtwaller

    Senior Member
    Joined: Nov 2018
    Posts: 338

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    puffermark that sounds like a nice collection. I hope to one day have such an army of pipes at my disposal. I’m obsessed with Peterson, for better or worse, so I imagine my collection will be about 50% Pete’s and 50% Estates. I’d love to have some old straight billiards, I’m a sucker for classic shapes. Gotta love the price and no break in! Maybe I should buy another estate pipe right now...

    Posted 5 months ago #
  36. pappymac

    pappymac

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2015
    Posts: 1,832

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I started out just buying junk pipes so I could teach myself how to clean and restore them. That evolved to where I only buy pipes that are, in my opinion, rare, old or pipes that were considered high value when new. I also like older pipes which have some historical significance in my mind. For example, I have a Linkman Hollycourt Special from the late 1930s to early 1940s. I bought it because Linkman became Dr. Grabow in the 40s. I have an early 1950s Kirsten that is a transition model between the original design and what came out in the early 60s.

    My oldest pipe is a Salmon & Gluckstein with a silver band hallmarked for 1896. Salmon & Gluckstein was the largest tobacconist in England with over 100 shops until they were sold around 1915.

    I also have a Soren freehand, an original Mauro de Armellini Cavalier and a large meerschaum carved into a lighthouse.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  37. donjgiles

    donjgiles

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Apr 2018
    Posts: 802

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I enjoy saving old pipes from the scrap heap. Most estates I buy are pretty beat up and neglected, I try to bring them back to life. Most of the time I leave the battle scars and work more on the preservation side as opposed to total restoration. I have an example of an old English Bulldog I have been working on, I will post images tonight when I am home. The poor thing was trashed! The chamber rim has been hacked pretty hard with some sort of knife and I am debating whether to leave the scars or sand it to make it more "perfect"

    I would be interested in hearing other folks talk about this subject of preservation verses total restoration. I should note that I am a history guy and work for a Historical Commission / Museum so my views may be much different than others.

    Don

    Posted 5 months ago #
  38. pappymac

    pappymac

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2015
    Posts: 1,832

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I would be interested in hearing other folks talk about this subject of preservation verses total restoration. I should note that I am a history guy and work for a Historical Commission / Museum so my views may be much different than others.

    @Don - I do have a couple of the Hunter style pipes that I found and did very little restoration on simply because I don't like the stems but liked the looks. I have this one and another one that is a sitter.

    Here are the two meerschaum I mentioned earlier.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  39. donjgiles

    donjgiles

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Apr 2018
    Posts: 802

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Wow Pappy,
    Beautiful pipes! Thank you.

    Don

    Posted 5 months ago #
  40. bnichols23

    Bill Nichols

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 2,593

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Salmon & Gluckstein with a silver band hallmarked for 1896.

    Yeah, I remember that S&G of yous, pappy. Really intrigued me since I hadn't known of them before. Quite a score on that one!

    Sorens, be still my beating heart. I lost out on a SON on fleabay recently; I was going to go $100+ for it but got sniped by a guy who went 150 in one beat. I've got enough of them for now, I suppose -- 3, but I'm sure I'll get the bug again if a nice one comes up. Going on a boat for a few days late next week & one of mine's already in the case packed to go. Nostalgia? You bet. The PHs are all staying home, which should tell you something.

    Bill

    Posted 5 months ago #
  41. pappymac

    pappymac

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2015
    Posts: 1,832

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Donjgiles clued me into what I was looking at with the Soren. The junktique shop I found mine in had a couple other Sorens and I gave the information to Don and he bought what they had. In hindsight, I probably should have bought another one myself.

    When I go fishing with my son-in-law, I take a couple of Missouri Meerschaum. If I drop one and can't fish it out of the water, I smoke the other one.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  42. gatorlope

    gatorlope

    Member
    Joined: Feb 2019
    Posts: 310

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Probably my favorite find is a nineteenth century ladies’ meerschaum that I found in an antique shop on Grand Cayman.
    The $300+ that they were asking for it was more than I had ever spent on a pipe, but it is exquisite! No regrets!
    I haven’t managed posting pictures to the chat yet, so I’ll just have to describe it.
    It is meerschaum, nicely colored in from years of smoking, with an amber mouthpiece and a silver band separating them.
    The case has an internal latch that you release by pushing a button and stamped inside in gold is a pair of gryphons rampant bracing a monogrammed shield with a crown on top of it.
    It is the smallest and most delicate of all my meerschaums and the internal measurement of the bowl is only half an inch.
    It’s unsigned and that’s a shame, because the quality of the carving would put even Yanik to shame as a fumble fingered idiot!
    The shape of the pipe is the bust of a slender necked young lady with her hair piled high on top of her head, exposing a matched necklace and ear rings.
    She’s wearing a ribboned straw hat on top of her hair and the very thin ribbons cascade from her hat’s brim to the pipestem below.
    The straw hat is a masterwork in itself as you can see the weave and details of its’ construction.

    That’s a pipe that could tell some stories!

    Posted 5 months ago #
  43. paulie66scandinavian

    Paul

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2016
    Posts: 3,099

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I don't have time to restore so when it comes to estate market I'd buy refurbished and because of this fact those English made ones weren't that affordable finds, nonetheless even with the faded finishes of those few I'm still quite surprised how well and effortlessly these do smoke, moreover,I have soft spot for those strictly classical English shapes so no wonder I find myself often looking at English made estates.

    Paul The Scandinavian'
    Posted 5 months ago #
  44. woodsroad

    woodsroad

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 8,497

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I like to cogitate over how many dead men once used my pipes.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  45. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 18,163

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    You guys are silly, I have never ever seen a dead man smoking a pipe.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  46. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2015
    Posts: 13,355

    online

    Login to Send PM

    I bet some were buried with their favorite pipe!

    Reminds me to add a pipe to my pyre (someone else will have to do it as I will be out of commission). Who says you can't take it with you?!

    Posted 5 months ago #
  47. cigrmaster

    cigrmaster

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 13,707

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I buy estate pipes for financial reasons. Over the years I have gotten some great deals. I bought a Castello Collection Occio Di Pernice that retails for 630.00 for 184.00 delivered. I have a Stephen Downie Apple I paid a 125.00 for. I have all kinds Rad Davis and Brian Ruthenbergs I paid 175.00 -225.00. Why pay 400.00 plus when you can pay half that for a nice estate?

    I do like some history and have half a dozen Pre Transition Barlings that are pretty cool. There are tons of good deals out there if you know what you are doing and are patient.

    Harris
    Posted 5 months ago #
  48. hoosierpipeguy

    hoosierpipeguy

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jan 2018
    Posts: 1,857

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I buy some new and some estate. If the estate is in really good condition, I clean it myself and start smoking. Otherwise, I just sent 4 off to Briarworks to be repaired/refurbished.

    The moment you take possession of a pipe, it technically becomes an estate. The first time you smoke it, there's no technically about it, it is definitely an estate. If you are patient and a bit knowledgeable, there are some excellent deals on the estate market.

    Posted 5 months ago #
  49. lordofthepiperings

    lordofthepiperings

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2010
    Posts: 6,462

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    For me estates are a way to get some really good pipes at a lower price point. I picked up two Pete Prevost estates that are really nice. One of them is one of his earliest workings with bamboo. Got a Silver Gray blasted hawkbill with fig shaped bowl for a really good price. Picked up a Sam Adebayo blasted horn that was at a really good price.

    I suggest using SmokingPipes. Their restoration team is incredible and they price the pipes pretty fairly, plus they do run discounts on estates from time to time (10-15% sometimes on a random weekend just because).

    "The thinking man always smokes a Peterson." -Peterson of Dublin
    Posted 5 months ago #
  50. gatorlope

    gatorlope

    Member
    Joined: Feb 2019
    Posts: 310

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Nice meerschaums, Pappy!

    Posted 3 months ago #

Reply

You must log in to post.

 

 

    Back To Top  | Back to Forum Home Page

   Members Online Now
   ben88, sholto, josephcross, jiminks, tnfan, jpmcwjr, loadclear, monkeylyf, chasingembers, craig61a, loneredtree, alaskanpiper, danimalia, thefishguy, ashdigger