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Deep Secrets of Pipe Filters

(61 posts)
  • Started 3 years ago by mso489
  • Latest reply from nevadablue
  1. mso489

    mso489

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    Every week or two, a Forums thread is started that at least includes questions about filters in pipes. Among the many questions asked by new pipe smokers, this seems to be the subject that is most mystifying. Many other subjects seem to be covered in catalogs, web articles, youTube pieces, articles, pipe enclosures, and by other means. I often jabber away, trying to explain a little about filters, enough so a new pipe smoker can make their own decisions. I feel sure most new pipe people learn about filters by buying pipes without knowing their filter status, and figure it out from there. It's not as if three or four pipe filter systems, or the choice between using or not using a filter, or having or not having a filter on your pipe, is some kind of government or Masonic secret. My thinking is that pipe manufacturers and retailers don't want to offer too much info for fear of losing a sale, so they let the beginners learn by buying pipes. It seems like most of this could be sorted out in leaflets and enclosures, to help newbies out. Maybe I'm just being fussy more than helpful, but Forums sure gets questions on a more or less regular basis. How did you learn about filters? Is there enough info available for people starting out? Or should I just go smoke a bowl of Latakia Flake and put this out of my old head?

    Posted 3 years ago #
  2. jacks6

    jacks6

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    I learned about filters by accident. I was surprised to find that my brand new pipe was making noise! I had no idea what it was at the time... It's also a pipe I haven't smoked often so I can't say I really know much about filters even now.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  3. fmgee

    fmgee

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    Vauen has some information on the 9mm filters. There are three tabs at the tob you can click as well.

    http://www.vauen.de/en/filter-information/interesting-facts-about-filters-.aspx

    Posted 3 years ago #
  4. mcitinner1

    mcitinner1

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    About 90% of my smoking is with my 12 Lorenzetti 9mm pipes with filter.

    Stan
    Godfrey Daniels!!
    The Plenipotent Key to Cope's Correct Card of the Peerless Pilgrimage to Saint Nicotine of the Holy Herb:
    Posted 3 years ago #
  5. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    The first pipe I bought ca. 1960 had a crappy paper filter. I discovered it by accident and trashed it right away. On the other hand, a Sav and a Rossi I bought last year take the balsa filters, and occasionally I will put one in for no apparent reason, just for a difference, though there is precious little difference.

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    Posted 3 years ago #
  6. pylorns

    James Foster

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    One of my first pipes was a dr. grabow with the filter in it - I kept smoking it not knowing it was in there.. and man that started tasing rank, so I opened it and had the "wtf" moment. So then I went and bought more.. then I just gave up... fast forward 20 some odd years later, I go back and use a filter occasionally... I'm a fan of brighams rock maple inserts since they don't impeed the airflow as much.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  7. mso489

    mso489

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    I've always avoided Brighams because I don't want to keep up with yet another filter system. I either buy pipes without filters, which I like best, or with 6 mm filters I can go without or use an adaptor. Rarely I'll use a filter. No 9 mm filter pipes. I don't think this is a wonderful solution, just mine. Some 9 mm filter pipes look great. I just don't like the trial and error aspect.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  8. jndyer

    jndyer

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    I would say that there is not very much information about pipe filters for a new pipe smoker. A perfect example of this is that after nine plus years of pipe smoking I still do not know if there is a way to buy an adapter for MM pipes that are designed to be used with a filter. I do not like the filters; however, I do not like how open the draw is when one tries to smoke them without the filter.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  9. ben88

    ben88

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    an adapter for MM pipes

    I would think Savinelli adaptor should work for MM

    Lasciate ogni speranza, voi ch’entrate
    Posted 3 years ago #
  10. mso489

    mso489

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    Yup. Any pipe that takes a 6 mm filter will take a Sav adapter, including MM cobs, Dr. Grabows, and Medicos. As mentioned, you can buy packets of adaptors for a few bucks from online retailers, SP for example.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  11. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    Just ran across an adaptor that came with a Sav, and was intrigued by how closely it resembles a tiny section of 1/4" spaghetti line used in home garden irrigation. Could work for some.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  12. jndyer

    jndyer

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    Interesting about the sav adapters. I have one sav filter adapter that I tried to fit in my MM pipe and it was too big. I had thought about buy a pack of adapters and some sandpaper to make them fit. I also thought about going to Lowes and seeing what I could find that might fit.

    Posted 3 years ago #
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    shutterbugg

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    The biggest misunderstanding regarding pipe filters is that they have a different intended purpose than cigarette filters. Cigarette filters are solid tubes of fibre intended to trap tars and other particulate matter, giving the smoker a false sense of security that somehow filtered cigarettes are safer. Pipe filters are either hollow tubes of absorptive material through which the smoke passes, or an absorptive rod around which the smoke passes. They are intended to trap moisture. That they trap some tars is coincidental.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  14. mso489

    mso489

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    jndyer, I bet I misspoke on the Sav adapters fitting the MM cobs. I assumed since the Sav adapters fit my Dr. Grabow, they'd fit any stem/shank designed to accept a 6 mm filter, but perhaps the filter adapter for the Sav happens to fit the Dr. Grabow filter chamber but not the MM cob chamber. I'll stand corrected unless I try out an adapter in one of my cobs and find it fits ... at least some of them. Then I'll come back and report that, maybe in a new thread. But it sounds like it doesn't work. I learn something every time I visit Forums. On most of my cobs, I went to Forever acrylic stems which turn all MM cobs with filters into no-filter pipes.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  15. ravkesef

    ravkesef

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    +1 on what Shutterbugg said, and now permit me to add to that a bit. Most Europeans prefer a filtered pipe. Perhaps some have been frightened into using them by the warnings on the tobacco packaging, but pipe filters do a great job of trapping moisture, and several of my pipes smoke much better with a filter. Here's a bit of information: The Frank Packing method is a technique for packing a pipe that leaves an air space at the bottom. Dr. Fred Hanna has developed a variant on that technique. Let's say you don't want to spend the time mastering one of these methods; what alternatives do you have? Well, there's the Dri-Kule filter, a small conical stainless steel mesh that you place in the bottom of the bowl, and then pack your pipe as you normally would. Voilà! the Frank Method in an instant. And the good news: it gives you a very dry and cool smoke with no dottle. I find this product to be particularly useful in my large, deep-bowled pipes. Two other products deserve consideration: the Denicool and the Nording filter stones. These are small pebbles that you put a few of in the bottom of your bowl, and then pack your pipe as you normally would. These marvelous little stones, about the size of gravel absorb moisture like crazy. Result: again a very dry smoke with absolutely no dottle. You see, dottle forms when the tobacco at the bottom of the bowl becomes moisture-laden. With these little rocks to absorb the moisture, there's no strong-tasting dottle--the smoke is dry and cool. OH--and one more fringe benefit--the rocks keep you from packing the pipe too tightly. Once again you've achieved the equivalent of the Frank method in a very easy fashion. Filters? Yes, they definitely have their place. Let's not have any of this "Real men don't use filters" garbage. Try it. If you like it, you're onto something good. And you won't be branded a sissy, a communist, or what have you. I've been smoking a pipe for nearly fifty-seven years, and certain of my pipes almost always get a filter. Why? Because they just smoke better with them. That's all. And no one can tell you or me that we're not doing it right.
    And by the way, thanks to MSO, my schoolmate (Mizzou) and Navy comrade in arms for bringing up the topic. It gave me the chance to talk about the topic as I've been wanting to do for some time.

    Eric
    Posted 3 years ago #
  16. mcitinner1

    mcitinner1

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    Let's not have any of this "Real men don't use filters" garbage. Try it. If you like it, you're onto something good.

    I already knew this, but thanks for your voice of long experience Eric. My 9mm filters make for a nice dry smoke. They're very popular in Germany, and you can't beat a little German technology. After all, they make some of the best tobacco blends there are.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  17. jerwynn

    jerwynn

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    I started buying and smoking filter pipes after researching the subject... I think originally on German language web-pages that between me, my son, and google-translate, we could have a good understanding. I wish I could cite some of the exact things we found out... just about all were things that I found impressive and worthy of consideration.

    I have 50 pipes in my collection, 48 are 9mm filter pipes that I use all the time, with Design Berlin pipes accounting for at least 20 of the 50. 2 are "normal" pipes: a Boswell Swirl Wizard and a Poul Winsløw crown freehand. I vastly and much prefer using 9mm filters in my day to day smoking. I DO keep an open mind... one of the reasons I own 2 fine-smoking non-filter pipes. I revisit them maybe once a month just for a "preference check". Easier draw and breathe-ability are indeed plusses with non-filter pipes... but in my usage, not enough to discount the plusses of the filters.

    The only occasional downer is that here (USA as opposed to Germany/Europe), frequently choices are more limited with 9mm filter pipes, although I think that's been getting better the last couple years. I see SO MANY pipes here on the forum that I am greenly envious of in terms of beauty and craftsmanship, but wouldn't buy myself because of the filter issue. The other thing is that over a couple of years of trying to get commission-made pipes, several of the pipe makers I contacted are not interested in making 9mm filter pipes and don't. I'm not sure why exactly. But then that helps me to save a little money too I guess... more to spend on tobacco!

    I don't hesitate to recommend 9mm filters to noobs... we all know the truly nasty things that can happen from time to time in pipery. The few converts I've enlisted for the ranks in this regard are all still happy hobbyists in our realms! And, incidentally, I can say that I have never received a bitten tongue with my filter pipes... hundreds and hundreds of bowls into it. (Not so, 35 years ago during my first experiments in pipe-world!)

    In terms of mso's original thrust of inquiry, I believe The Truth Is Out There!! It just requires a tiny bit of digging perhaps... but now, as opposed to 35 years ago, you can research sitting at home in your skivvies with a cold beer on the side as the whole universe opens before you on your glowing screen.

    And now, I must walk the dog! He loves filters too!(for a snack, the wee gasterd!!)

    “Deep peace of the running wave to you.
 Deep peace of the flowing air to you.
 Deep peace of the quiet earth to you.
 Deep peace of the shining stars to you.
    Deep peace of the infinite peace to you." - Fiona Macleod
    Posted 3 years ago #
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    shutterbugg

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    Pipes condense moisture at the tenon, which is why that's where they put the filters. Using absorptive pebbles or a screen or the air-pocket method in the bowl won't prevent condensation at the tenon.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  19. ravkesef

    ravkesef

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    Shutterbugg said:

    Pipes condense moisture at the tenon, which is why that's where they put the filters. Using absorptive pebbles or a screen or the air-pocket method in the bowl won't prevent condensation at the tenon.

    Shutterbugg is correct. Almost. There are two reasons for situating the filter in the tenon. 1. That's where the condensation occurs. 2. Look at the construction of a pipe. The tenon is the most convenient place to put a filter, especially since all the smoke has to pass through there. By the way, pipes condense moisture at the tenon because most pipes leave a space there. A well-constructed pipe will have the tenon fitting tightly in the mortise, with no space for condensation to occur. However, when there is no filter there, using filter stones or a conical screen traps almost all the moisture before it ever gets to the tenon. I've smoked hundreds of pipes using these add-ins and seldom have I found any moisture in the tenon.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  20. jacks6

    jacks6

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    How many bowls can you smoke before changing the filter?

    Posted 3 years ago #
  21. pagan

    pagan

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    Whoa! hold on there pardner, your saying pipes have filters?

    Nowhere in the world will such a brotherly feeling of confidence be experienced as amongst those who sit together smoking their pipes
    Posted 3 years ago #
  22. jerwynn

    jerwynn

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    I change filters after each smoking "session"... about 2 to 3 contiguous bowls... no ghosting, no leftovers, and no demonic entities left. I am OCD about cleaning and "clean" and each pipe gets a thorough alcohol swabbing, degunking if needed, and wax&polish each time after it cools. I don't mind this routine with the filters at all... I don't find it "expensive", nor is it inconvenient... it's just part of my pipe ritual and provides yet more opportunity for me to enjoy my pipe's grains, finishes, shapes, what-have-you.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  23. jacks6

    jacks6

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    Thanks jerwynn. That's what I was looking for. Today was the first time I've smoked a fairly new Stanwell that came with a filter and gave my usual pipe a break. I realized I had no idea when to throw out the filter and buy more. For some reason I thought they were meant to last a while since only the 1 filter came with the pipe lol.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  24. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    Do try a few bowls without the filter at all! If tobacco is properly dried, and you don't smoke too fast, there'll be no gurgle.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  25. alexnc

    alexnc

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    I searched and searched for research. Finally I concluded that I had never wanted to put a filter on a cigar and maybe that meant something. But really, I love the 9mm balsa and put 6mm balsa in cobbs. Sav is the only one I've ever read that made any % purification claim - and the method and measure are unknown so far as I have found. I think Dr Pearl and others make generic claims. Not that I really believe much of it. But if the moisture any filter traps is laden with tars, using no filter would mean that moisture is vaporized into your smoke instead of being tossed with the filter. Right?

    Goo Goo g’joob
    Posted 3 years ago #
  26. jerwynn

    jerwynn

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    Hey jacks6, DEELIGHTED to have hit the mark for you! I'd be afraid of a filter left in there for a year or forever... I find that mine can get really nasty in just two or three bowls, especially with "wetter" tobaccos... hence the regular swap-out. One of things I now recall from some literature someplace was the figure of 97%... Probably from the indigenous Dr. Perl and/or Vauen resources. It was said that a 9mm activated charcoal filter effectively removed 97% of tars, carcinogenic irritants, etc etc etc from the smoke by the time it reaches the smoker. I think there might have be a nicotine reduction figure as well. I definitely find pipe smoking with a filter more gentle on my mouth tissues. I don't really care about nicotine... i.e. I don't "need" a hit at regular intervals. (I do care about it not throwing me to the floor and kicking my head in... which still happens from time to time, filter or not) I know many American pipe smokers have a thang about filters... but looking at the German market, there must be something to it. I'm happy!

    Oh... one other thing I thought of: I like the 9mm filters with ceramic end caps at BOTH ends best! Some, I think Dr. Perl maybe, have a blue plastic end cap and a ceramic end cap, plastic being towards the smoker. Plastics and heat don't mix well in my mind. "Blitz" filters are the one's I use the most(both ceramic end caps)... and they can be had even on Amazon... bought my last bag of 200 there for 20 some $$$. Happy puffing!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  27. alexnc

    alexnc

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    I do agree with Jerwynn. After getting used to - even balsa filters, it does seem more gentle on my mouth. More notably if I switch back and forth

    Posted 3 years ago #
  28. mso489

    mso489

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    I believe Europe's mass conversion to filter pipes came as the result of the report on smoking when people became aware of health problems with tobacco. The U.S. market also had strong, long-time contenders among filter pipes, such as Dr. Grabow's, but probably was less unanimous in going to filters. Now I harken back to the discussion on cigarettes that posited that for many cigarette smokers, the filters cut back on nicotine so significantly increased the number of cigarettes smoked. Pipe smoking may work the same for some pipe smokers, where filter pipes prompt smoking three or four bowls for what might be one bowl in an unfiltered pipe. People's habits and relationship to nicotine is so various, it's difficult to speak for individuals, but this may be one of the effects of filters. You probably have to assess your own situation and habits on this.

    Posted 3 years ago #
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    aldecaker

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    Speaking of the Savinelli 6mm adapters, I have occasionally thought of them in a slightly different light. Well, their operating concept, anyway. Since it is generally accepted that too much of a gap between the end of the tenon and the bottom of the mortise causes moisture accumulation, I have considered fabricating adapters to fill this gap in some of my unfiltered pipes. They would basically look like Sav adapters, just with a much shorter length and different outside diameters, tailored to the pipe they are to be used on. Of course, this is coming from the same nipplehead who is considering re-creating the Dr. Grabow pre-smoking machine with an air compressor, a very low PSI regulator, and an aircraft vacuum-instrument venturi, so take it in the experimental "what if" spirit!

    A man who serves his country is a patriot. A man who serves his government is an employee. The two are not always the same thing.
    Posted 3 years ago #
  30. mawnansmiff

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    "Pipe filters are either hollow tubes of absorptive material through which the smoke passes, or an absorptive rod around which the smoke passes. They are intended to trap moisture. That they trap some tars is coincidental."

    Shutterbugg, perhaps you are confusing filters with stingers? As far as I understand it is that a filter is precisely that, a method of filtering out minute particles in the smoke thereby reducing somewhat the risks associated with smoking.

    Stingers on the other hand perform a very different task, that of 'trapping' some of the moisture in the smoke by condensing it as it hits the stinger preventing it reaching the mouth.

    Am not sure what you mean by an 'absorptive rod'. I fail to see how aluminium can absorb anything!

    Or have I missed something here?

    Regards,

    Jay.

    ...take up thy stethoscope and walk...
    Posted 3 years ago #
  31. mso489

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    ...absorptive rod, maybe the Brigham tubes? Maple rock filters, whatever they're called.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  32. mawnansmiff

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    "...absorptive rod"

    MSO, I think only Shutterbugg has the answer to that one.

    Regards,

    Jay.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  33. rigmedic1

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    Through the year I have experimented with nearly every type of pipe contrivance I could find, looking for the elusive "perfect" smoke. What I have learned is that many tobaccos that I hated were wonderful in 9mm filter pipes. Others were no different, and several tobaccos that I love were absolutely terrible in a filter pipe. My first 9mm filter pipe was a Peterson Grafton 999 bent bulldog that I purchased from a man in Romania. It is still one of my favorite pipes, typically with a Big Ben filter. That's my best Virginia pipe.
    I have a Savinelli Bing's Favorite that is great with VaPers, as long as I use the balsa filter. Also, I love EMP, but it is best, for me, in an M&M cob with a paper filter.
    I encourage experiment. Only the Sith deal in absolutes.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  34. fmgee

    fmgee

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    I encourage experiment. Only the Sith deal in absolutes.

    I have found the same things as rigmedic1. Certain tobaccos that I found a little harsh around the edges are wonderful when I put them in one of my 9mm pipes. Likewise there are blends that I did not like at all in one of my 9mm pipes which suddenly sing in a non-filtered pipe (MM 965 was one of them). Generally I smoke Virginias in non-filtered pipes and heavy English blends in 9mm filtered pipes. Other blends or middle and light english it really depends on what I find best for my tastes. I don't find any change in flavour when using the balsa filters.

    I have not tried the balsa filters in a cob. I'll have to give that a try and the paper ones are not very nice but I find then draw more to my liking when they are there.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  35. jerwynn

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    [/quote] I encourage experiment. Only the Sith deal in absolutes.

    Yes! Great concept, great to try different things, great to keep an open mind. As firm and happily resolute as a filter man I am, say on the 20th pipe or so, I switch to one of my two "normal" pipes (no filters, a Boswell Swirl Wizard, and a Poul Winslow freehand) and I am almost always stunned at the freedom and effortlessness of the things! These pipes seem to breathe by themselves. And contented sipping can carry on for hours and carry me away to Happy Land!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  36. jacks6

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    What's the best replacement for a Stanwell 9mm filter? I don't even see the Stanwell ones as in stock..

    Posted 3 years ago #
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    aldecaker

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    Is it possible to try making your own with balsa stock from a hobby shop? I do that for my Sav 6mm balsa system sometimes, and also for my Grabows that take the paper filters (which I do not care for at all).

    Posted 3 years ago #
  38. jacks6

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    Not really an option. If I decide to switch to Savinelli filters will I need a Savinelli adaptor? Or will any 9mm filter do?

    Posted 3 years ago #
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    aldecaker

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    The Savinelli adapter takes the place of the filter; it is not used in conjunction with it. I am not familiar with the Stanwell 9mm setup, but if it just takes a cylindrical filter that slips into the hole in the tenon, I see no reason Sav 9mm balsas wouldn't be a plug and play replacement.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  40. rigmedic1

    rigmedic1

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    All the 9mm filters I have seen are interchangeable. I primarily use the Big Ben Brand, and the Dr. Perl by Vauen, and locally I can get the Castleford brand. I did not care for the Stanwell filters, because the draw on them was difficult. Dr. Perl filters have a blue end and a white end, and the blue end goes towards the mouthpiece.
    I have tried Savinelli 9mm balsa filters, and I felt that the 9mm charcoals served my tastebuds better. I do use the 6mm balsa filters in my Savs, in which I primarily smoke VaPer blends. There is a lot of moisture in South Louisiana, and the balsa filters soak up a bunch of it.

    Posted 3 years ago #
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    aldecaker

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    I've never owned a 9mm filter pipe, but I have a bunch of Grabows that take 6mm. While I like the balsas, I found the Grabow/Medico type paper filters to restrict the draw too much, and they seem to dull out flavors a lot. The balsas don't do either of those for me. I actually used them in Grabows long before I owned a Savinelli.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  42. stvalentine

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    Whoa! What happened to the mutual filter-bashing here on pipesmagazine? At last some understand the reason for using filter in pipes.
    Being German I´d like to make the remark that we are not overly concerned with health issues (at least us pipe smokers) and we use filters to catch the moisture and only the moisture! I personally don´t care about which kind of filter as long as it doesn´t restrict the airflow and keeps tobacco bits out of my mouth. A good filter doesn´t even impair the taste of the tobacco. Do I only smoke filter pipes? Heck, if I like a non-filter pipe enough I smoke it anyway. So no secrets or strings attached here, try it you´ll like it'!

    "Ride it like you stole it!"

    The Old Swede
    Posted 3 years ago #
  43. jerwynn

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    stvalentine: that's funny, you don't LOOK German!!!! Hahahahahahaaaaaaaa! (sorry!

    Best value I've found in 9mm filters are the Blitz filters... cheapest place yet to get them is Amazon.(Stick "blitz pipe filters" in the search field, and voila! Several options!)

    Posted 3 years ago #
  44. draco

    draco

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    Most of my pipes are estates without any provisions for filters and I genuinely enjoy smoking them filter or not. I do have a weakness for the Author shape so thus have more than one pipe that takes the 6mm filters, all are Savinelli 320s most of which are made for the 6mm filters. I smoke them with and without, with adaptor as needed. Not a great difference in taste though the Savinelli balsa filters so absorb a lot of moisture so I tend to use them for the wetter blends especially aromatics. They usually lasts a few bowls, especially if removed after use and allowed to air dry. Bought in bulk they are reasonably priced.

    I also have a few 9mm pipes and I usually use filters in those. I use absorba brand filters usually as they are inexpensive when bought in bulk and seem to work well. They contain activated charcoal and one end is white, made of porcelain for the heat which goes towards the bowl and a green plastic end that goes towards the stem. Again they absorb a lot of water and I use them for aromatics that tend to smoke hot as they seem to reduce tongue bite.

    As far as adapters I use those issued with the pipes usually. I have read above that some are interested in making their own, I would use caution as to what they are made of. Mention was made of sprinkler hose which may be maid of pic or possibly ABS or other plastics that may react badly to the heat and chemicals released by smoking tobacco. I would recommend Delrin as many makers have been using that for tenons for new stems and as fixes for broken ones.

    Much like smoking itself the use and need of a filter or not is up to the user.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  45. ravkesef

    ravkesef

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    IN my post above I noted that filters do a great job of absorbing moisture and hence eliminating dottle. These filters, the Dri-Kule, the Denicool and the Nording stones do not alter the taste of the tobacco, unless you're a dottle lover. The 9-mm filters, on the other hand, can alter the tobacco's taste, depending upon their composition: paper, activated charcoal, etc. You'll be the best judge of any effect on taste in your various pipes. But if simple moisture reduction is your goal, the three filters I've mentioned do a great job, giving you a drier, and hence cooler smoke.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  46. newbroom

    newbroom

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    I started with MM Legend and didn't realize it had a filter in it for about a week of constant cigarette style smoking some OHM Bold. I knew NOTHING.
    Here I am, 2 yrs later and I'm putting the stingers BACK into some of the estate pipes I've picked up because I've learned how to smoke a pipe.
    I think with stingers and filters, the draw is an important aspect of consideration.
    I'm finding that with a stinger in place, the venturi effect is more at play and can work to your benefit or detriment depending on your balance, cadence and pack.

    Posted 3 years ago #
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    pappap

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    I take the filter out of any pipe I buy,I use an adapter in 9mm pipes, and nothing in 6mm I prefer a pipe with no filter

    Posted 3 years ago #
  48. ben88

    ben88

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    Making mine own 6mm and 9mm from balsa wood.
    Works like a charm. A $5 piece yields about 900.
    It became a part of a pipe smoking experience.
    Making a filter right before lighting up..

    Posted 3 years ago #
  49. sunriseboy

    sunriseboy

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    Bit of a late post, but just tonight I figured out what filters suit me best. Have the Savinelli balsas and Brigham Rock Maples and the paper Medicos. Value for money the Medicos are brilliant. The Rock Maples tend to create a lot of moisture in my Wizard bits and the Savinelli's, IMO, are 50% too short. So after a year of trials, Medicos get the gig.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  50. fitzy

    fitzy

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    Hmm not sure how I missed this the first time around.

    I don't own any 9mm filter pipes and won't buy one. I do own several Sav's and generally smoke them without the filter.

    I did own a Brigham but found the draw too restrictive so I got rid of it.

    "These are ghosts that are more at home in a girdle-filled drawer than one of my pipes." Quote by Neil Archer Roan on lakeland ghosts
    Posted 2 years ago #
  51. oldmansmoking

    oldmansmoking

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    Filters are very much horses for courses. I personaly don't like them. Keeping the smoking experience to one side I had a very nice pipe almost ruined by a filter which got hot and melted to the shank on one of my silver banded pipes. Got the filter out but had to cut the shank back.
    I don't like filers and no longer use them.

    A pipe is the fountain of contemplation, the source of pleasure, the companion of the wise ☪️
    OLDMANSMOKING
    Posted 2 years ago #
  52. mcitinner1

    mcitinner1

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    I'm a 95% 9mm smoker and it's hard to imagine getting a filter that hot. For me they just get to varying stages of dampness, depending on how dry the tobacco is.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  53. snowyowl

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    Keeping the smoking experience to one side I had a very nice pipe almost ruined by a filter which got hot and melted to the shank on one of my silver banded pipes. Got the filter out but had to cut the shank back.
    I don't like filers and no longer use them.

    I have about a hundred filtered pipes... so I think I can speak to this. It is possible to melt a filter to your pipe, if you inserted the wrong end.
    While I don't use "two-tone" 9mm filters -- where one end is ceramic (white), but the other end is plastic (blue or green) -- a couple of companies, including Peterson, sell these things.
    If the user makes the error of putting the ceramic end first into the stem, then the plastic will face the fire. It can melt! So don't do that.
    On the other, if you have 9mm filters where both ends are white, then both ends are ceramic and heat resistant. Never melting.

     photo Petefilter_zps4xeykkzs.jpg

    [When you look at the pipe's stem after inserting a filter, stop -- if you see the warning color, reserve the filter; insert the stem into the pipe if you see ceramic-white.]

    "If you see something... pipe up."
    Posted 2 years ago #
  54. woodsroad

    woodsroad

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    Here is a thread from several months ago that touches on some of the same issues, but with a full autopsy of balsa pipe "filters".

    Posted 2 years ago #
  55. mso489

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    With a cob for example, or with any pipe, I think it is good if a new pipe smoker takes out the filter and tries the pipe without, just to see what that is like. Then the filter can be added back, for that experience. Then a choice can be made as one goes along, as to what is best. I think filters can be like filtered cigarettes, just a prompt to smoke twice as long to get the flavor, kind of chase it down. But it is very personal. I think a filter may be a good idea at pipe shows or clubs where you are smoking many bowls more than usual. That's when maybe you don't need the smoke full blast. I rarely use a filter, but I smoke very moderately. My humble stash of tins and jars will last me for years, though I still buy the occasional tin, bulk, or pouch.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  56. woodsroad

    woodsroad

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    My findings with the balsa absorbent "filters" are that they improve the smoking experience by removing moisture from the smoke stream. Flavor reduction was very minimal, if at all. I'm going to give pipe stones a try, too.


    Posted 2 years ago #
  57. seitz55

    seitz55

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    The biggest question I have about pipe filters is, does it take away the flavor of the tobacco?

    “After some time he felt for his pipe. It was not broken, and that was something. Then he felt for his pouch, and there was some tobacco in it, and that was something more. Then he felt for matches and he could not find any at all, and that shattered his hopes completely.”

    ― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit
    Posted 2 years ago #
  58. bluegrasspipe

    bluegrasspipe

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    I experimented with filter pipes when I first started really getting into pipes again a couple of years ago. I have (2) Vauen pipes that are 9mm, and 2 peterson 9mm filter pipes plus a MM cob paper filter. I don't find that is causes a huge loss in flavor at all..
    I was a little having trouble with tongue bite mostly the next am, (maybe steaming my tongue a bit). I really like these filtered pipes though. I will have to get a balsa type pipe next, for academic purposes only..
    That being said I do have a lot of other pipes that are filter-less, I enjoy both in their own right. I can see how smoking using the breath method with filters may hinder the draw slightly and thus be a little annoying to those that really like an open draw.
    I am also surprised that we have yet to hear someone explain the proper way to use a filter, which in these filter threads someone inevitably says to toss it over your shoulder and never use one again..

    For tho' at my simile many may joke,
    Man is but a pipe—and his life but smoke.
    Posted 2 years ago #
  59. woodsroad

    woodsroad

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    The biggest question I have about pipe filters is, does it take away the flavor of the tobacco?
    As Well, they aren't really filters, they are absorbents. But flavor reduction was very minimal, if at all.

    I am also surprised that we have yet to hear someone explain the proper way to use a filter

    I can do that:

    1. Pull stem
    2. Insert filter
    3. Reinsert stem
    4. Smoke
    5. Change filter frequently (I do it every bowl)

    Posted 2 years ago #
  60. bluegrasspipe

    bluegrasspipe

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    Woodsroad, that is a much more useful description of filter use. And I concur, after every bowl, otherwise it tastes pretty bad..

    Posted 2 years ago #
  61. nevadablue

    nevadablue

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    Thanks for this thread!

    ---
    Ken
    Posted 2 years ago #

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