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Danish School?

(58 posts)
  1. tobefrank

    tobefrank

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    I’m mainly attracted to American and Danish pipes. My favourite two pipes are a sandblasted Bruce Weaver lovat and a Sixten Ivarsson design Stanwell lovat shape 124 that I bought as an estate.

    It is often mentioned that a pipe is designed or shaped according to the ‘Danish School’. This made me wonder: what are the characteristics of the Danish School of pipe making?

    I’d be interested about peoples’ thoughts on this.

    Posted 3 days ago #
  2. sasquatch

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    There are at least 5 "schools" but of course they are growing and blending all the time. Pipes started out as a factory thing, you have a template of things like billiards and bulldogs, shapes that take to being machined out. There is always lots of "hand work" on any pipe but the idea on these pipes is that in a sense, they all come out the same.

    In the 60s, some crazy Danes got the idea that maybe pipes didn't have to be so boring, and starting making shapes that were unique, and more than that, shapes where the grain of the wood was not just a random circumstance. Sixten Ivarsson is probably the first guy that people look at in this regard. But this blossoms into an aesthetic school where curves are very careful and mathematical, shapes are often sparse (certain ones like the Blowfish have become more complicated) and even severe at times.

    If you contrast this with Japanese pipes, for example, you see a huge difference in proportions and goals.... Japanese pipes feature little nods to nature, assymetry, more mixed finishes, additions of traditional decorations - generally it's really easy to tell a Japanese pipe from a Danish one, and sometimes the easiest way to learn about this stuff is to go look at a hundred examples. Look at Tokutomi and Satau for examples.

    There may be an American school at this point, where ideas from the other schools are understood and applied, but the shaping is a little more traditional. Rad Davis and Ryan Alden would be good examples, as would Roush and Butera I guess. Myself too if I think about it, having been taught mostly by Americans, I have embraced most of those ideas, even if I mostly make factory-ish shapes now. Airway construction, internal setup is paramount in this school too, where some of those old Danish pipes are pretty poor inside (again corrected, these schools affect each other).

    I'll stick the Italain neo-classicism in here - you see pipes that are almost parodies of the traditional factory pipes - ballooned out, elongated, squashed. Playful shapes. Fun pipes. But far less care in terms of those exacting Danish curves, right, like... close enough will usually do on these. The very best examples are indeed very well and carefully made pipes. The difficulty everyone else seems to have in making a Castello 55 shape properly is proof.

    Look again at Russian pipes - lots of crazy shaping, a little more organic than Danish ones but less than Japanese - almost a mechanized them in some of them, like if you drew a cartoon of an animal, made it a robot, and then made it a pipe... lots of little details and shapes, anything goes as long as it's interesting. Yashtylov and Revyagin are great examples.

    Posted 3 days ago #
  3. jpmcwjr

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    tobefrank. Photos? They'd be appreciated.

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    Posted 3 days ago #
  4. sablebrush52

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    Probably the chief characteristic I've both seen and heard discussed by Danish carvers is the idea of following the grain and shaping for it, unlike the traditional British and French schools who had developed a canon of classical shapes that adhered to fairly exacting ratios while generally ignoring the grain of the wood.
    The result of the Danish School - often attributed as having been created by Sixten Ivarsson - is a more flowing and organic reinterpretation of the classical canon and the introduction of new shapes and freehands. There is still a lot of mathematical precision in the shaping, just as there is with the classical shapes, but its expression takes on a more flowing form and is affected by the grain patterns of the block being shaped.

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    Posted 3 days ago #
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    mau1

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    Great topic and input. Thanks guys!

    “I've been treating you with courtesy and respect because that's the way I choose to treat everyone. But never, ever mistake kindness with weakness.”
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    Posted 3 days ago #
  6. mso489

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    Thank you, sas' and sable'. I've become familiar with Danish style visually, but I had never heard it verbalized before. I have several good representations of freehands from Nording, Johs, and an anonymous Thompson Cigar House pipe (stamped West Germany!). I have a Stanwell pot, the squashed tomato look not cylindrical, designed for them by Sixten Iversson. But this discussion clarifies my ideas about the Danish school(s). Freehands gave rise to an infinite number of poorly designed pipes from off-brands, but imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.

    Posted 3 days ago #
  7. jfred

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    The Stanwell 124 lovat was also one of my first pipes. Now, many new pipes later, it's still one of my favorite smokers.

    Posted 3 days ago #
  8. dmcmtk

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    Danish School, a good place to start is to look at the late 1950's - early 1960's catalogs of Stanwell (Sixten Ivarsson), W.O. Larsen (Sven Knudsen), and PipeDan (Gert Holbek) to get a good sense of what I would call the "Early Danish Modern".

    http://www.danishpipemakers.com/pdf/stanwell2.pdf
    http://www.danishpipemakers.com/pdf/wo1.pdf
    http://www.danishpipemakers.com/pdf/pibedan_61_62.pdf

    Another pipe maker to look at from this period is Svend Axel Celius,

    https://pipedia.org/wiki/Celius

    What came next is what I would call the "Fancy Freehand" period, just look at pipes by Preben Holm etc. Even Holm's pipes in the early ~ mid 1960's were rooted in the shaping of the "Early Danish Modern".

    The pipedia entry on Sixten Ivarsson is quite good,

    https://pipedia.org/wiki/Ivarsson,_Sixten

    Dave
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    Posted 3 days ago #
  9. cigrmaster

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    For my tastes the Danes make some very cool Dublins, Apples and Brandy's. I own a number of Rad Davis pipes and some of them pay homage to the Danes. I like the way the Danes get their pipes to flow in a cool and unique way.

    Harris
    Posted 3 days ago #
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    mau1

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    Funny this topic should come up. A couple of days ago I asked if it would be possible to have a Danish Pipes section created under Pipe Talk. I'm a fan and would like to see all discussions/pictures in one place.

    Posted 3 days ago #
  11. sablebrush52

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    The idea of an American school is interesting. I honestly don't know if it exists in any identifiable form. There are a number of American carvers who produce Danish influenced carvings, like J Alan, and others who produce shapes that are very much based on the classical French/English canon, like Scottie Piersel, and still others who have created a very personal approach to carving, like Lee Von Erck. Maybe the American school is that there is no school.

    Posted 3 days ago #
  12. cigrmaster

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    Jesse, I think the American school could be a bang for the buck type thing. When it comes to smoking properties, my 52 No American artisan pipes smoke as good if not better in many cases than the higher priced Danes and Scandinavians I owned in the past.

    I have 2 other artisan made pipes, one is a Jose Rubio from Spain and a Simone Gilli from Italy. The Rubio smokes great and the Gilli is still a work in progress. The Gilli has a hot spot I am hoping more cake will cure it.

    Posted 3 days ago #
  13. npod

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    Danish School?!? After chasing pipes for years and looking/touching/trading, the "schools" become something you just know when you see it.

    The phrase "I know it when I see it" is a colloquial expression by which a speaker attempts to categorize an observable fact or event, although the category is subjective or lacks clearly defined parameters.

    Quote from the famous Justice Steward: I shall not today attempt further to define the kinds of material I understand to be embraced within that shorthand description ["hard-core pornography"], and perhaps I could never succeed in intelligibly doing so. But I know it when I see it, and the motion picture involved in this case is not that.

    Variations on a similar pipe shape:

    Danish (Eltang, yep, that's Danish School)

    American (Polman, yep, that's American Style, note I didn't say School)

    Italian (Castello, yep, that's Italian School)

    Japanese (Tokutomi, yep, that's Japanese Style/School)

    Chinese (XuHai, yep, that's Chinese School/School)

    Neal
    Posted 3 days ago #
  14. cigrmaster

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    Neal, great pics, thanks for posting them. That Eltang I could have picked from a line up. It is so him and his Danish roots. The flow, shape and the stain are dead giveaways.

    Here is an American artisan named Jerry Crawford. His take on the Danish Egg is this pipe and the price is of course a lot different than the Eltang( if it is a Snail grade it is around 1500.00)
    https://www.blueroombriars.com/collections/crawford-pipes/products/jerry-crawford-pipe-smooth-danish-egg

    Posted 3 days ago #
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    mau1

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    My contribution...

    Posted 3 days ago #
  16. dmcmtk

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    From the Early Danish Modern,

    more here,

    http://pipesmagazine.com/forums/topic/larsen-handicraft-de-luxe

    and,

    see,

    http://pipesmagazine.com/forums/topic/larsen-copenhagen-special

    and,

    I could go on, and on, and...

    Posted 3 days ago #
  17. dmcmtk

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    And since I also mentioned Celius,


    Posted 3 days ago #
  18. cigrmaster

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    mau and dc, great picks guys. Here is a lousy pic of a great pipe. It is one of only a couple I wish I had never sold.
    It is a Former and had incredible straight grain.

    Posted 3 days ago #
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    mau1

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    Those are beautiful pipes, guys.

    Posted 3 days ago #
  20. dmcmtk

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    What came next is what I would call the "Fancy Freehand" period, just look at pipes by Preben Holm etc. Even Holm's pipes in the early ~ mid 1960's were rooted in the shaping of the "Early Danish Modern".

    Two early (early ~ mid '60's) Preben Holm stummels to illustrate my point,


    and some later Preben Holm "Fancy Freehands",

    Posted 3 days ago #
  21. fusion

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    I odered my first Danish pipe just today, a Neerup

    Posted 3 days ago #
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    mau1

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    I couldn't resist posting another pic...Preben Holm. I call this one "A Whale of a Tail".

    Posted 3 days ago #
  23. georged

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    The second post in this thread should be made a sticky, I think.

    (I don't know how that creature even types, never mind comes up with succinct, articulate thoughts, but there you go. Some things ya just gotta accept.)

    .

    Dogs live such short lives... and spend most it waiting for us to come home
    Posted 2 days ago #
  24. sasquatch

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    Ha. You know me George, I put a LOT of thought into this stuff, and the resulting distillate is sometimes worthwhile - sometimes not!

    But of course, you read it knowing that stuff, and having ideas about it in your head which line up very well with the ones in mine, so you read it and think "EXACTLY!" but I think this stuff is hard to come to grips with, it was for me.

    Posted 2 days ago #
  25. lonestar

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    You could find a number of different explanations to explain the different schools of Pipe Making, but I don't think you could find a better expression of the ideas than in Sasquatches post above. Very well said.

    To elaborate a bit with my own thoughts, It's a bit difficult to define each style because they all flow from one another and borrow from one another. The Grandfather of it all of course is the French style of Pipe Making, which more or less invented the ideas that make up the modern pipe. The English took the entire French style and mostly added marketing, but added a bit stylistically and in some cases elevated the quality of construction with a focus on factory style hand made pipes over sheer mass production numbers.

    The Danish style evolved from the sort of stodgy British style as described by Sasquatch.
    The Japanese school *is* an extension of the Danish school that found it's own voice for expression.
    The Italian school (schools) are well described by Sas. There are several styles under the "Italian" banner though. They mostly stem from the individual visions of a handful of pioneers, and are continued today inside the different artisan factories they each created.
    The Russians, I don't know where they get it. Somehow "if you drew a cartoon of an animal, made it a robot, and then made it a pipe" is a better explanation than anything I could come up with !

    To my mind, the American school is a complete Osmosis of all these different styles, often in the same pipe. My favorite shape is a Lovat. My favorite way to make a Lovat is with a Classically English shaped bowl, with somewhat Italian proportions, and the domed Top and crisp short saddle stem of a Danish billiard. If I want to make a truly classic English shape, I have to consciously change the details I would normally add to a Billiard like the rim of the pipe, the taper of the shank etc. If I want to make a classic Danish shape, I have to consciously change the shape of the bowl and the shank.
    I think Americans sort of take what we like best from all the different schools, and make that.

    -Ryan Alden
    Posted 2 days ago #
  26. sasquatch

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    Sable - try this on for size: There is a definite American School. But not every American carver performs inside the tenets of that school - Piersel and Erck would be good examples. Ernie Markle is American but makes Danish pipes, outright - that was his goal.

    But there is an American School and it blends Danish and English traditions, it seeks proper proportion without being stodgy. It does NOT seek for crazy stuff like reverse bumblebee tunafish like the Russians, as a counterpoint. And finishing. Finishing finishing finishing (something the Russians are less careful with).

    I'd put Mycah Cryder and Todd Johnson at the far end of the shape exploration spectrum (TJ being highly influenced by both Danish and Japanese, but having healthy respect for English), a guy like Abe Herbaugh is not quite as far out there, Ryan Alden and Rad when he was carving are more traditional yet, and again, I'll argue that a pipe like this here is an "American School" pipe even if it's made in Canada. Tight, tight shaping, the pipe is "right", but the color scheme isn't English, neither are the curves.

    Contrast this with a really "Italian" version - more color, more chin, utterly arrogant shaping. More curves!

    Here's a more "English" Oom Paul - stem is not quite as severely shouldered, cut is tight but the blast is deep enough to "unshape" it a bit - a faux pas in the Danish school.

    So it's not just that I live in Canada so I carve in the Canadian School. There are recognizeable, distinct elements in pipe shaping/finishing.

    Posted 2 days ago #
  27. dmcmtk

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    Two pipes from two American (Old) School pipe makers. These two pipes completely changed the way I thought about pipes. I bought these about ten years ago, up until that time I had mostly traditional shapes. These two pipes revealed to me the sculptural potential of a pipe. The sitter is a Mark Tinsky Pristine 6 One Star, the bent is an eight sided Paneled Dublin carved by Curt Rollar in 1982.


    Posted 2 days ago #
  28. georged

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    As long as we're diving in, my overriding sentiment concerning this school business has nothing to do with style, but execution.

    What does execution have to do with school or style, you ask?

    Good question. It SHOULDN'T have anything to do with either... but sloppy, rushed-looking execution---primarily with regard to shaping (as opposed to finish)---is so commonly found on Italian pipes that it has BECOME a de facto component of the style.

    Some Italian marques are better than others in this respect, but all of them suffer from it to some degree, and sometimes it is flat-out egregious, such as with the following example.

    (NOTE: There are still a number of line problems with the overlaid "fix"... the markings only serve to point out the "Are you shitting me?" stuff on the existing not-so-hot overall shape.)

    .

    Posted 2 days ago #
  29. tobefrank

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    Thanks so much for all the great responses and discussion, especially Sasquatch and Sablebrush.

    I guess I have seen a lot of the different ‘schools’ of pipe making by browsing the smokingpipes.com website, but I’ve never seen the differences and characteristics put into words this well.

    I think I have finally worked out how to post photos, so here photos of my two favourite pipes. Both lovats, but both very different.

    Bruce Weaver

    Stanwell 124

    Posted 2 days ago #
  30. tobefrank

    tobefrank

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    Second try:

    Posted 2 days ago #
  31. workman

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    Yeah tough isn't it? Once you learn how to post a picture, you have have truly mastered the art of pipesmoking.

    Smoking is one of the leading causes of all statistics.
    Posted 2 days ago #
  32. dmcmtk

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    Bruce Weaver

    Stanwell 124

    Posted 2 days ago #
  33. bnichols23

    Bill Nichols

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    George, I hate having to say it, much as I love Italian pipes (Lorenzo, Sav, & Brebbia mainly) but you're right -- the bowl radiusing & threw-a-couple-of-darts-maybe? stem shaping on that one are just dear-Lord-heinous.

    Tell the tuth, I really hadn't *thought* much about it at all, although I of course *had* noted the differences between early & late Holm. I much prefer the wilder ones, like mau's whale tail; maybe it's just because they're more abstract & out there.

    TBH, the stuff Preben did on the Ben Wade name never really did much for me, swoopy as they were. I think it was because after a while they just all looked alike, know what I mean?

    Bill

    Head Black Frigate keelhauler, boss powder monkey, & troublemaker 1st class.
    Posted 2 days ago #
  34. sasquatch

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    So that Weaver lovat has elements of Danish - the bowl shape being jowl-heavy rather than sort of a barrel proper is a very Danish approach to billiard bowls, for example. I would suggest it's cut with the bowl at 90 degrees which is very Italian, and neither English nor Danish. Shank is heavier than an English/French cut, and frankly the stem work is 100% better than either as well, so to me, that's an American school pipe. An intentional blend of a bunch of ideas.

    The Stanwell is Danish in design and execution, flared long curves on the shank (matching the curvy ideas of the bowl), a playful stretch of the shank and a reflection of that in the foreshortened stem, where all the recurve happens in a 1/2"! Visual balance added by that heavy saddle, so the pipe is aesthetically really pleasing and balanced.

    Bill, I think lots of stuff got stamped "Preben Holm" or done under Ben Wade stamping where Preben was maybe ... in the factory somewhere, but not maybe making those specific pipes by the truckload every day. If I peruse eBay and look at Preben Holm stuff, about 1 in 20 or 1 in 50 strike me as being really, really good freehands - organic and interesting, balanced and intentional, rather than just a sort of organ-shaped lump, and I assume those are actual Preben-made pieces.

    Posted 2 days ago #
  35. cigrmaster

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    Sas, what would you consider these Lovats to be school wise.

    Posted 2 days ago #
  36. dmcmtk

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    Bruce Weaver,

    Larsen Copenhagen 78 Super (mid '60's),

    Posted 2 days ago #
  37. sasquatch

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    Harris, let's run through the visual, stem to bowl - the stem is really well cut, fine shouldering, good looking buttons. The adornment is pretty big on that barrel, but it's a pretty large diameter and I think it's not TOO big, which is to say it adds some visual definition against the bowl size (and the smooth rim which also attracts the eye). Shanks look pretty straight (not seeing taper in either direction really, but it's hard to tell on blasts).

    The bowl on the black pipe is...not as good as on the red. The chin is over cut lending a Dublin-ish look to what is really a billiard shape. The red pipe is chubbier, looks like a better billiard shape to me. And really this is just to say that it's easier to slightly miss a billiard shape than to get it.

    They're not factory pipes, they're not Danish because the shaping frankly isn't quite good enough and the blast is too good, as it were. Stem work is good and the shanks maybe just a hair heavy, so to me these are American School pipes, if Rad made them I wouldn't be surprised, but a guy like Wayne Teipen comes to mind too.

    These are fusion-pipes, right? English stem material, Danish bowl treatment, English Blasting ideals, that tamarind or spalted birch detail on the stem is.. a bit busy for most Danish makers. But the whole pipe for the most part is excellently constructed, so I call American.

    Posted 2 days ago #
  38. sasquatch

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    And for what it's worth, to anyone listening, this stuff gets strange: the two guys I learned probably the most about pipe making from are Rad and Todd Johnson, and I don't especially like most of the pipes either of those guys made. I see that they are good pipes, but my own personal aesthetic doesn't match theirs, even if they taught me pipe aesthetics. So the idea that we are trying to make one homogenous thing here by rote is not applicable - it's not that there's some single set of rules, it's more, as I think George said earlier, a set of ideas, a "feeling" that is portrayed through execution.

    Posted 2 days ago #
  39. cigrmaster

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    Sas, you are right they are both Rads, great eye. I am amazed at how you so easily explain why one thing is good and another not so good. I have never looked at a pipe with that kind of detail. My eye sees a couple of nice looking pipes that I figure should smoke great because of who made them.

    Posted 2 days ago #
  40. sasquatch

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    When I was getting going, I had a choice about my pipes. I could make whatever thing I imagined, and do it just "my way" and basically it would be an ugly piece of crap. If I took that ugly piece of crap and asked Rad or Todd or Mark Tinsky or whoever the hell would talk to me, and if I did what they said to do... the pipe sold. So these guys knew some kind of magic formula, they had some power that I didn't have and couldn't understand - all I saw everywhere I looked was nice pipes.

    Guys like George and Rad and Bruce helped me learn what made a pipe "right". I could drill them, make a stem, whatever, but that final touch of "and now people will line up to buy these" was missing for me, and I had to struggle to understand the aesthetics of beauty in general, and in pipes in specific. Along that path, I looked hard at the various schools, what makes something Japanese-y for example, and I looked hard at the difference between something badly done and something done well that I don't particularly like, and that's really slippery stuff when it comes to pipes. But the end result, for me, is that I can now see "good work" even if it's not something I find I would want to own. And the aesthetic(s) that I build my pipes with may not appeal to certain folk - but it's been a long time since anyone's had genuine aesthetic criticism for me (possibly because my pipes are so stripped down at this point there's just nothing left to change).

    Posted 2 days ago #
  41. georged

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    Sas, you are right they are both Rads, great eye. I am amazed at how you so easily explain why one thing is good and another not so good. I have never looked at a pipe with that kind of detail. My eye sees a couple of nice looking pipes that I figure should smoke great because of who made them.

    The fun is only beginning.

    The brain-study folks have known for a long time that humans can't see things until they're pointed out and named. Sounds weird, but is literally true. Mother Nature then doubles down... after you HAVE seen and neurologically cataloged the whatever-it-is, you always will from that point on. You can never "un-see" it.

    It's much of the reason most pipe collectors buy everything they can afford early on, then become increasingly particular and go through "purge" periods in subsequent years. What once looked good disappoints after a while.

    It happens on the other side of the fence as well. Any significantly accomplished carver can tell you all about it. (I know several who buy up their OWN early pieces when possible to "erase" them from the public record)

    Posted 2 days ago #
  42. dmcmtk

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    Todd, as long as you don't start eating puppies!

    Posted 2 days ago #
  43. sasquatch

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    Sure, would love to have about 100 pipes back for immediate disposal, whaddya do?

    Check out this lovat I made last year - dead plain, no adornment, and just ... made it, didn't look at other pictures, just made a pipe I thought looked "right".

    But just compare the ... general feel... to Rad's, and it's... basically the same proportions etc, just distilled simpler yet.

    Here's another "American" pipe, and strangely, you can compare it directly to Rad's black lovat, even though it's a bent.

    Black blast, relieved at the rim with an eye-catching (and practical) smooth bevel. We need another point of visual balance, so that brass ring between the black/black works pretty well. And the lines are smooooth. And the proportions just... just... a little chubbier than ye olde Englande pipe. But not as flubbery as a Castello. Heck no. So as much as that's an amalgam of Danish, English, and Italian ideas.... well, yeah, that's the American School.

    Posted 2 days ago #
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    laniromee

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    I just wanted to weigh in on the American School debate:
    Smokingpipes.com has a video on Alan Brothers pipes in which Jeff Gracick kinda suggests that the "American School" may be defined with a particular type of aesthetics: muscular, stout, forward heavy and compact. Maybe there's something to it? I believe that description fits a lot of american pipemakers body of work and also american made factory pipes .

    Here's the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uTBB6RlGAdw

    Posted 2 days ago #
  45. chasingembers

    Embers

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    Though being a big Dunhill collector himself, I would say that Bruce was heavily inspired by Danish design.

    Damnation seize my soul if I give you quarters, or take any from you.
    -Edward Teach
    Posted 2 days ago #
  46. dmcmtk

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    A good article about American artisan pipemaking. Like all the different aesthetics, I'd say the "American School" has evolved. We see the early influences in the 1960's ~ '70's of several European styles, and some very creative pipemakers/designers; Ed Burak, Andrew Marks, Eliott Nachwalter, Jack Weinberger, Mike Butera etc.

    Go West

    https://pipedia.org/wiki/Go_West

    Posted 2 days ago #
  47. bnichols23

    Bill Nichols

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    Thanks for all the incredible in-depth, Sas'! On the BW stuff, yeah, I'm almost dead certain of it. BW put out so many pipes during that timeframe that for them to all be crafted by Holm he'd have had to have been at least 100 clones of himself! I'd never commit heresy & say they were [gasp!] "machine made," but I'd put real money on there having been at least 15-20 master forms that were used as models by the subordinate carvers.

    Over the years, first behind the counter & then from the user side, I saw so many that with dang nearly identical elements (high frontal swoop with a deep vee in the middle, etc.) that I can't think it was any other way. There being only so many creative ways you can put those together, no surprise that so many would be genetic duplicates!

    B

    Posted 1 day ago #
  48. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

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    My personal tastes with regard to American carvers tends to favor those with a very personal style. So I have pipes like these:

    Paul Tatum:

    Trever Talbert:

    Lee Von Erck:

    Piersel:

    Cannoy:

    That don't adhere to any orthodoxy except smoking well.

    Even my one remaining Holm:

    is crazy strange.

    This stands in stark contrast to the English pipes I have that are largely classical and traditional.

    Posted 1 day ago #
  49. chasingembers

    Embers

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    Holm he'd have had to have been at least 100 clones of himself!

    Holm had many talented carvers working under him in his workshop. Among them was his foreman of operations, Poul Winslow.

    Posted 1 day ago #
  50. tobefrank

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    Thanks for posting the photos for me, dmcmtk. I guess I haven’t quite worked out the ins and outs of posting photos on this forum.

    Thanks also for the comments on the pipes, sasquatch. I had a feeling that there was some Danish influence in the Bruce Weaver as well.

    The reason I love the Bruce Weaver is that the design looks very minimalistic and precise to me. Probably because the bowl is angled at 90 degrees to the shank as you pointed out, and the shank is dead straight. But then it’s got this sandblast that puts a more organic feel to it, at least to my eye.

    I think one thing that is quite distinctive for the ‘American school’ is that it has taken the sandblasted finish to another level, compared to any of the other schools of pipe making.

    You are also correct about the internal engineering being much better in American pipes compared to the Danish pipes I own. A lot has to do with the Danish pipes mostly being designed for 9mm filters. I smoke the Stanwell 124 with quite an open adapter, which luckily doesn’t restrict the draw too much.

    Posted 1 day ago #
  51. bnichols23

    Bill Nichols

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    100 clones of himself!

    Holm had many talented carvers working under him in his workshop. Among them was his foreman of operations, Poul Winslow.

    Yup, that he did, during the sadly way too short time he was able to be in the business, but for the essentially mass production of BWs at least *some* standardization had to have been in place, otherwise there wouldna been so many almost identical ones in all the display cases BITD. His having the soon-to-be-famous Poul as shop boss was in fact THE main reason I'd been casting about for one of his for my collection. The one I got from SPC's a gorgeous but not *too* crazy floral in the properly wild PH tradition.

    B

    Posted 1 day ago #
  52. danish

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    You are also correct about the internal engineering being much better in American pipes compared to the Danish pipes I own. A lot has to do with the Danish pipes mostly being designed for 9mm filters. I smoke the Stanwell 124 with quite an open adapter, which luckily doesn’t restrict the draw too much.

    tobefrank, I think big 9mm filter pipes from Denmark mostly made for mainly the German market, not part of domestic Danish design, only for export, since only few Danes used filters or bought bigger pipes.

    Posted 1 day ago #
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    mau1

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    Bill, that's some nice pipe!

    Posted 1 day ago #
  54. johnmosesbrowning

    johnmosesbrowning

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    Who brought the bamboo stem into vogue?

    Posted 1 day ago #
  55. sasquatch

    sasquatch

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    Dunhill's "Whangee" is the first "modern" version I think, but I'll bet bamboo was smoked through before that, somewhere...

    Posted 1 day ago #
  56. chasingembers

    Embers

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    The one I got from SPC's a gorgeous but not *too* crazy floral in the properly wild PH tradition.

    Think my Hallmark's too crazy? I actually appears on Holm's Pipedia page, and still remains unsmoked.

    Posted 1 day ago #
  57. mso489

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    This thread will bear re-reading. I'm not sure Forums has ever delved quite this deeply into pipe design.

    Posted 1 day ago #
  58. workman

    workman

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    Ha! MSO, I was thinking the same. History is being written here. This is the most interesting thread in a long time.

    Posted 1 day ago #

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