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Coconut Pipe.

(42 posts)
  1. bienden

    bienden

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    Coconut wood, have you ever known it before?
    This is a popular wood in my country. I tried several pipes, this is a pipe I just made.




    Making a pipe is my hobby. My nickname means Black Sea. Very happy if you call me "Black Sea".
    Posted 7 months ago #
  2. cosmicfolklore

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    Beautiful!!! I would be curious as to how it smokes... or tastes.

    Michael
    Posted 7 months ago #
  3. eaglewriter1

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    The Grain itself seems to definitly lend itself to craftwork. I am curious how this one deals with the heat from Smoking, because from the looks alone this will make for some stunning pipes.

    Posted 7 months ago #
  4. georgebmcclelland

    georgebmcclelland

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    That is an absolutely gorgeous pipe. I love the juxtaposition of the lighter wood on the shank, and the black in the grain of the coconut is very well complimented by the black stem. The shape is very attractive as well, though I would also love to see a classic shape with that grain.

    I'm curious as well, with the others on their question; how does it smoke?

    Posted 7 months ago #
  5. carolinachurchwarden

    carolinachurchwarden

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    That's a beautiful pipe! I love the grain in the bowl. I can't help but be curious about how it handles moisture and heat though. It looks very nice, and would be a great piece to add to a collection if it smokes great.

    "If you can't send money, send tobacco." - George Washington

    Posted 7 months ago #
  6. folanator

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    It's unanimous. Awesome piece. Also interested in the properties of coconut. Needs to be stuffed with Luxury Twist Flake.

    Coconut timber comes from farmed plantations of old coconut palms. The coconut palm was planted as a crop in large plantations throughout the tropics in the early half of the 20th century in order to harvest the coconut fruit. The tree bears fruit until approximately 70 years of age, at which point it is considered to have reached the end of its economic life and is felled to make way for future crops. Each year, several million palms are felled throughout the tropics. Traditionally, the trunks have been wasted by-products from this process.

    Only in very recent years have people begun to explore the potential commercial uses for this vast, alternative supply of timber. This led to the commercial launch of coconut timber in a range of different products, from flooring to posts to furniture. With these products performing at equal to or even better than conventional hardwoods, coconut timber represents a viable substitute for endangered hardwoods from an ecologically-sound source.

    Characteristics

    Coconut trunk, showing typical grain of coconut wood
    Its wood is reminiscent in appearance to mahogany; however, coconut timber has a much more fibrous grain than mahogany and lacks mahogany's iridescence. Colour tones and hues range from golden to near ebony, with dark brown flecks. There are three basic colour divisions relating to the timber's density: dark brown tones (high density); medium brown tones (medium density); and light golden tones (low density).

    Coconut trees have no annual growth rings, rays, heartwood or branches, meaning that coconut timber is free from knots and other such imperfections.

    Properties
    The coconut palm is a monocotyledon. It has a smooth, slender stem that grows to a height of about 25 metres and with an average diameter of 300 mm. The hardest, densest part of the wood is found on the outer perimeter of the trunk, which gives the tree its strength, while the wood’s high silica content gives the tree elasticity. Towards the centre of the trunk, the wood gets less hard. The wood has a Janka ball hardness of 112,5 - 154,7 kgf/cm2 (1600 – 2200 psi), which is greater than that of oak (70,3 - 84,4 kgf/cm2) and Douglas-fir (35,9 kgf/cm2).

    Posted 7 months ago #
  7. carolinachurchwarden

    carolinachurchwarden

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    The wood has a Janka ball hardness of 112,5 - 154,7 kgf/cm2 (1600 – 2200 psi), which is greater than that of oak (70,3 - 84,4 kgf/cm2) and Douglas-fir (35,9 kgf/cm2).

    Wow! That hard, huh? Never would of have thought! Saw somewhere for briar:

    Briar Erica arborea 960-1138 (sometimes seen it at 2000)

    That would mean that coconut wood could be even harder than briar.

    Posted 7 months ago #
  8. scloyd

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    That's amazing. Me too...how does a coconut wood pipe smoke?

    Posted 7 months ago #
  9. trouttimes

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    Carolina, thanks for putting that in dumb speak. I love the look but was concerned with the hardness compared with briar. I want one!

    “The Road goes ever on and on Down from the door where it began.
    Now far ahead the Road has gone, I must follow if I can
    Posted 7 months ago #
  10. crashthegrey

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    Very cool. I will admit that I was hoping to see a coconut pipe, but the coconut wood makes a lot more sense.

    Posted 7 months ago #
  11. voorhees

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    Wow. Love that grain. You might be onto something everyone may want.

    Jason
    Posted 7 months ago #
  12. irishearl

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    Most definitely beautiful grain.

    Posted 7 months ago #
  13. eaglewriter1

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    Interesting, so if it is used as a substitute for hardwood, meaning it has comparable propertys, I would imagine it can handle heat rather well, looking at my Missuori Meerschaum Hardwood Pipes.^^

    Posted 7 months ago #
  14. civilwar

    civilwar

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    Beautiful Pipe

    Posted 7 months ago #
  15. npod

    npod

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    It’s Ben said already. But I have to throw in and say beautiful pipe.

    Neal
    Posted 7 months ago #
  16. chasingembers

    chasingembers

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    I would certainly buy one. Wow!

    I like coffee exceedingly.
    - H. P. Lovecraft
    Posted 7 months ago #
  17. olkofri

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    The hardest, densest part of the wood is found on the outer perimeter of the trunk, which gives the tree its strength, while the wood’s high silica content gives the tree elasticity.

    Wonder what's the diameter of the tree. Furthermore, what's the thickness of the outer perimeter. I'm wondering that because of this, greater skill would be needed to carve a pipe from coconut wood, since the carver would have to avoid introducing part of the soft portion in.

    Not the sweet, new grass with flowers is this harvesting of mine;
    Not the upland clover bloom...
    Posted 7 months ago #
  18. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    Beautiful wood! Interested in smoking properties.

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    Posted 7 months ago #
  19. anthonyrosenthal74

    anthonyrosenthal74

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    Now that's something you don't see every day! What a striking pipe. Bienden, you have been showing some wonderful pipes. I'm glad you joined this forum

    Arrrrr, shiver me timbers! International Talk Like a Pirate Day is September the 19th!!!
    Brothers Of The Black Frigate
    Posted 7 months ago #
  20. wolflarsen

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    Wow! Gorgeous pipe!

    Is it for sale?

    Posted 7 months ago #
  21. bienden

    bienden

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    Glad that you care about the coconut wood pipe.
    This is the third one I did.

    ***
    I would like to answer your questions:
    - First, why do I try Coconut wood? Because this is a benign, non-toxic wood. Vietnamese people used coconut wood to make chopsticks, spoons and other kitchen utensils. Next, coconut wood has a fibrous structure, very similar to the Briar wood veins. See link https://www.google.com/search?biw=1366&bih=697&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=3Z85XOPpJ5jmwQPBs6P4Dg&q=g%E1%BB%97+d%E1%BB%ABa&oq=g%E1%BB%97+d%E1%BB%ABa&gs_l=img.12..0l3j0i5i30l7.6594235.6596607..6603086...4.0..1.107.865.9j1......1....1..gws-wiz-img.......0i67j35i39j0i8i30.uiamt3V9fOU#imgrc=8ofzxchj55ovuM:
    - How it smokes? The taste is neutral, like you smoke a Morta wooden pipe.
    - Wood absorbs water very well, perhaps due to its structure have many fibrous grain? . Take a look at the picture, the ash is white - meaning that the tobacco have been burnt off and the bottom of the bowl is not water stagnant.

    - Contrary to my fear, this wood can withstand the heat. Perhaps due to the wood structure of hard fibers?. So far, the inside of the bowl of the two pipes I smoke still keeps its shape. They were not burned.
    ***
    But it happened a sad thing: Always appear small cracks in the mouth of the bowl as shown below.

    Fortunately, the crack did not continue to grow large. You can see the picture: the crack remains the same even though I burned it many times. I guess the reason is a thin bowl? So this third one I tried to make the bowl really thick :).
    *** Can be temporarily concluded: coconut is not the perfect wood to make pipes. Even though the taste is good, the wood is heat-resistant and absorbs water well, but no one likes their pipe with cracks (although it doesn't affect the quality), right?
    For me, carving the pipe with different types of wood is an interesting discovery. Nice to share with you

    Posted 7 months ago #
  22. bienden

    bienden

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    I'm glad you joined this forum

    Thanks anthonyrosenthal
    Is it for sale?

    I make a pipe just for use, as a hobby. Therefore, I have not thought of selling them. Sorry.
    Many thanks for your interest.

    Posted 7 months ago #
  23. bienden

    bienden

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    olkofri, Can this photo answer you?

    Posted 7 months ago #
  24. cortezattic

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    Beautiful, creative, and resourceful! Thank you for the pictures, and for broadening our horizons.

    I find myself sitting idly on the line dividing past and future,
    as if I could kill time without injuring eternity. -- Thoreau
    Posted 7 months ago #
  25. pappymac

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    @bienden - I really like the looks of the pipe in the first photo.

    As for the one with the crack, how long was the wood dried and aged before you tried carving it. I've four pipes from seasoned briar but have experimented with cherry and pecan wood. From what I've read, the best wood for pipes is boiled for hours to remove any sap and then dried and aged for years. It may be that the wood for the one that cracked wasn't aged long enough to prevent it from cracking.

    Like I said, I'm not a professional or artisan pipe carver. I've just done a few for personal use.

    I am glad we have a good admin and responsible moderators.

    Heave to you dark colored ship under sail! Prepare to be boarded!
    Posted 7 months ago #
  26. bienden

    bienden

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    As for the one with the crack, how long was the wood dried and aged before you tried carving it. I've four pipes from seasoned briar but have experimented with cherry and pecan wood. From what I've read, the best wood for pipes is boiled for hours to remove any sap and then dried and aged for years. It may be that the wood for the one that cracked wasn't aged long enough to prevent it from cracking.

    The piece of coconut wood has dried for a long time, you can see its white mold appearance. Cracking is the nature of this type of wood?
    Regarding the wood boil, I consider it unnecessary. By boiling, we have lost the "natural binder" of cellulosic layers. I experienced suffering because of following someone's "instructions", boiled and forced to throw away some precious Briar wood.They cracked.
    I believe that letting dry wood in a long time will be a way to bring quality wood. The wood is not only dry, but also removes the acrid taste of sap.

    Posted 7 months ago #
  27. crashthegrey

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    I don't think a crack is a deal breaker. It definitely makes it unique and interesting.

    Posted 7 months ago #
  28. jpmcwjr

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    As for the one with the crack, how long was the wood dried and aged before you tried carving it. I've four pipes from seasoned briar but have experimented with cherry and pecan wood. From what I've read, the best wood for pipes is boiled for hours to remove any sap and then dried and aged for years. It may be that the wood for the one that cracked wasn't aged long enough to prevent it from cracking.

    Like I said, I'm not a professional or artisan pipe carver. I've just done a few for personal use.

    Not am I and I haven't even started with a block. But whether drying or aging or a combination of both is what would help, I think it's worth exploring.

    Posted 7 months ago #
  29. olkofri

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    olkofri, Can this photo answer you?

    You bet! Thanks!

    Posted 7 months ago #
  30. craiginthecorn

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    My Marine son-in-law picked up a coconut pipe for me in Hawaii. The seller claimed it was handmade on the island. The bowl is tiny --barely bigger than a pistachio. The stem has no mouthpiece, and here's the kicker... it's labeled Key West. I will cherish the pipe as a gift, but can't help chuckle whenever I see it. It's actually pretty nice for smoking Gawith Hoggarth Dark Birdseye, which is a very strong shag cut.

    Posted 7 months ago #
  31. mso489

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    An aside, but I keep reading the thread title as Coconut Pie, probably coconut cream pie.

    Posted 7 months ago #
  32. unkleyoda

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    Coconut Pie, probably coconut cream pie.


    So you say you can drink? Well, I'm from Wisconsin. Try to keep up.
    Posted 7 months ago #
  33. artificialme

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    Just saw this today. That terrific. Excellent execution for palm wood. Shame it's not for sale.

    Adhie was here
    Posted 7 months ago #
  34. pepesdad1

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    I assume you are using the tree trunk....am I right about that?

    Posted 7 months ago #
  35. mikethompson

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    Yes, it is the timber from the coconut palm.

    Very nice looking pipes. There must be a multitude of uses for coconut timber as well. What a great addition to the forums you've been bienden.

    Posted 7 months ago #
  36. pappymac

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    Regarding the wood boil, I consider it unnecessary. By boiling, we have lost the "natural binder" of cellulosic layers. I experienced suffering because of following someone's "instructions", boiled and forced to throw away some precious Briar wood.They cracked.

    Don't tell that to some of the briar suppliers in the Mediterranean areas who have been boiling briar for over a hundred years.

    http://bouchematbriar.com/briar.html

    https://pipedia.org/wiki/Curing_%26_Treating mentions boiling the briar.

    https://woodbarter.com/threads/briar-harvesting.17804/

    Of course, what works for briar may not necessarily work for coconut wood.

    Posted 7 months ago #
  37. crashthegrey

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    I agree that boiling is necessary for briar, pappy. I am not going to do the research on coconut wood, but I would be inclined to believe the same. The cracked rim may be an indicator. But I could also be completely wrong.

    Posted 7 months ago #
  38. bienden

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    I think that boiling the wood is immediately after harvest, when the wood is fresh, then it will naturally dry.
    I believe that it is not necessary to boil wood when it has been dried for 2-30 years, even as bad as my experience.
    Ha ha ..., I think so because I only have dried Briar wood.
    Nice to discuss with you.

    Posted 6 months ago #
  39. brian64

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    Just seeing this for the first time. Those are all beautiful pipes, but that top one in the OP is really stunning! The grain is just amazing. Very nice work.

    “Bipartisan usually means some larger-than-usual deception is being carried out.” – George Carlin
    Posted 6 months ago #
  40. seanv

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    Great looking pipe Bienden. I too would like to add one to my collection. If they ever come up for sale, make sure to post them here first.

    Posted 6 months ago #
  41. raevans

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    You may have found your calling with this one Bienden, beautiful pipe. You may only be doing this as a hobby, but you have people interested and talking.

    Posted 6 months ago #
  42. bienden

    bienden

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    Thank brian64 raevans

    If they ever come up for sale, make sure to post them here first.

    Yes. Many thanks for your interest.

    Posted 6 months ago #

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