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Briar Quality in Dunhill

(87 posts)
  • Started 1 year ago by psperrytops
  • Latest reply from ssjones
  1. psperrytops

    psperrytops

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    I have read a lot about briar quality in Dunhill, and I know some fans prefer the older Dunhills to the newer ones. But my question is more related to briar supply. I understand there are basically three sources for briar: Italy, Algeria and Greece. Italian briar as I understand can only be supplied to Italian pipe makers leaving the other two available for international distribution. As I understand it, Dunhill is very selective with their briar, taking only the finest, regardless of source. My question relates to availability of this finest briar to independent custom pipe makers, whether in Europe or the United States. There are some very high priced one of a kinds made by custom pipe makers that even exceed the price of the higher end Dunhill (root briar, for example). Do these pipe makers have access to the same sources, which I presume they do, but does Dunhill, and possibly even Castello in Italy, get first pick because of their greater volume and position/presence in the market? Does Dunhill get first pick before other pipe makers because of their volume and luxury branding?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  2. kenbarnes

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    Hi psperrytops.
    Historically, We (James Upshall) bought plateaux briar from the Arta Company, Arta, Greece and Achaiki, Patras, Greece. The sizes that we bought were Extra Extra quality Large plateaux, Extra Extra PLSLL (Large Large PLS) PLSL (Large PLS). PLS which is the smallest plateaux normally went to Stanwell, Preben Holm and other Danish makers. Dunhill bought ebauchon blocks from the same saw mills which are smaller size blocks and normally cross-grain.For large Extra Extra Plateaux a bag would contain 9 dozen blocks. For approximately the same price, a bag of ebauchon blocks could contain 24 dozen - 50 dozen blocks in a bag. Dunhill used these ebauchon blocks for machine turning their catalogue shapes whilst we used the most expensive blocks for hand-turning. I know that in the 1970-1980s Dunhill would also source AB bowls (clean bowls or bowls with small sandspots) from some French manufacturers and others.
    Today I buy finest quality plateaux blocks from two sources in Italy and Achaiki in Patras has also offered to supply me with plateaux. I live in the U.K. I hope this helps.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  3. jpmcwjr

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    Psp- You've heard from one who really knows, having been there, done that, and is doing it again. (Hooray!)

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  4. mso489

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    Are briar blocks sold at auction, by contract, or wholesale at set prices? Is briar only available the places you mentioned, or is it the labor force that is lacking at other locations? Harvesting briar seems like incredibly heavy work.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  5. lightmybriar

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    Great question, great answer. Superb information!

    On a pipe adventure
    Steve
    Posted 1 year ago #
  6. sasquatch

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    Briar "quality" is very subjective. Naturally if every Dunhill piece was perfect physically, there would be no need for sandblasting. In fact every one would be a "DR". Such is not the case.

    Quality briar comes in many forms - smoking quality is one thing (probably based on curing process as well as region). Looks are another.

    There's lots and lots of very good briar - I just bought some yesterday at the Chicago show, with help from the cutter even. If you have the money, honey, they have the goods.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  7. kenbarnes

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    Are briar blocks sold at auction, by contract, or wholesale at set prices? Is briar only available the places you mentioned, or is it the labor force that is lacking at other locations? Harvesting briar seems like incredibly heavy work.

    Hi mso489
    blocks come at a more or less standard price. There are some batches that are ok and some that are beautiful. Extra Extra (that's the quality)Large Plateaux costs between $40 -80 per block. I usually by the biggest blocks, not to make big pipes, to have 'enough room' to find the grain and bring it out.
    In the 1980s I remember contacting a saw mill in Corte, Corsica asking if they could supply me with top quality briar and they replied that the saw mill was closed down although they could open it again if I wanted to buy some briar.
    The whole process is, to my mind, exhausting. I once tried to dig out a burl of briar in the foothills of Arta. I was pretty fit in those days and boy was it exhausting! Once the burls arrive at the saw mill, a lot more work is required to produce one block of high grade plateaux briar. The other day, a briar cutter sent me a breakdown of the yield he gets at his saw mill, which I found fascinating.

    "we cut more or less from 90,000 to 120,000 kg a year of fresh briar and only 30% will be blocks for pipes (70% wood for fire); of these 30% of blocks yielded, 70% will be ebouchons for factory production (small blocks for making catalogue shapes – ‘series turning’) and 30% plateaux in 3 grading: the 30% plateaux yield is: TOP level I super 10%; II grade good 30%: III grade for sandblast 60%.
    If I consider only the top level plateaux (10% of the total plateaux) 90% are for brandy (apple) and Dublin shapes and free-style and perhaps only 10% for billiards and if the shank is long only a few blocks a year for a Canadian. On the low grade you have more possibility to find a Canadian and a billiard shape but the quality of the wood is not as nice as the first grade."

    Posted 1 year ago #
  8. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

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    Ken,

    This is great information! Thank you!

    It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt. - Mark Twain

    It is pointless to argue with a fanatic since a dim bulb can't be converted into a searchlight. - Jesse Silver
    Posted 1 year ago #
  9. seacaptain

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    Great info kb, thanks for taking the time to post!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  10. folanator

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    Amazing insight here. Thanks so much.
    Q: Why is it harder to find a block suitable for a top grade Canadian?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  11. jvnshr

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    Why is it harder to find a block suitable for a top grade Canadian?

    Probably because the length of the shank in a Canadian shape is longer than in any other shape.

    Javan
    Posted 1 year ago #
  12. folanator

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    Probably because the length of the shank in a Canadian shape is longer than in any other shape.

    I understand that.

    Just don't get why a flaw would be more critical for a shank as opposed to the bowl. They both are similar surface areas.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  13. warren

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    Shank is more fragile than the bowl. Ergo, any weakness in the shank deserves more consideration than one in the bowl. That's my guess.

    A man without a shillelagh is a man without an expedient.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  14. sasquatch

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    There's lots of big briar, and lots of perfect briar. Perfect big briar is ... pretty rare.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  15. civilwar

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    Great thread, thanks for the info!!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  16. crashthegrey

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    Best thread in months.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  17. saltedplug

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    The wood. The wood. The wood. One maker uses Triple XXX briar from the famed heath trees in outer Saskatoon, and then oil cures it and air cures it for another 20 years. Castello air cures for 10 years. The wood. The wood. The wood. But I ask you, if you have any favorite woods, just what did they do for you?

    "Oh, I find the Triple XXX oil-cured consistently gives me a rounder smoke."
    "Oh? What do you mean by "rounder" and how would you describe it?"
    "Oh, can't rightly say."

    Now there may indeed be something to what you say. But until it can be measured and the pipe community can find that same roundness, it has no reliability and is just another selective perception used to market pipes.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  18. sasquatch

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    Bit more to it than that, salted.

    Maybe Ken will play a game with us: three blocks here Ken, which one do you want?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  19. saltedplug

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    Hark! Yonder the call of a larch (a pipe maker who knows something).

    Posted 1 year ago #
  20. jpmcwjr

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    Just for a lark, I'll play: the one on the right....

    Posted 1 year ago #
  21. kenbarnes

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    Maybe Ken will play a game with us: three blocks here Ken, which one do you want?

    I'll play!
    The block on the right hand side has quite wide grain although, sometimes this wide grain can be depicted as 'angel hair' which, if stained and finished well, can look quite nice. This type of block can sometimes be pretty clean when cutting it i.e. not many flaws coming up.
    The block in the middle probably has some nice grain on the 'front' of the block i.e. on the right hand side but staggered grain on the left. I would suspect that it has much tighter grain than the first one. In order to produce a straight grain from this block, I would need to tilt the block when cutting it in order to 'straighten up the grain'. You can see that the grain runs diagonally/at an angle. This block requires some cutting skill to bring the best grain out.
    The block on the left is most probably the finest of the three. It may well have some really nice tight grain on the left side and nice tight grain on the right side too. It may need some subtle tilting to pull back/align the grain still further ready for turning. I would cut this block slightly 'off the grain' so that when it is turned the grain would return in a spectacular way. This type of high grade block can be fraught with danger (flaws running through the block along the grain, and needs some real attention when cutting it. Whilst all three blocks have the potential to be finely grained pipes if cut well, this block could be something really special.
    Did you want me to say which saw mill supplied which blocks?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  22. saltedplug

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    I asked a pipe guy about "reading" grain from the surface of the block and he replied emphatically that this wasn't possible. But in the back of my mind I thought that this must be possible as the maker is going to want to get the best from the block, and even if uncut, he would find trying to read it irresistible. Why can't the outer be at least in some sense predictive of the inner?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  23. sasquatch

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    Completely impossible to read a block from the top, it can only be that Ken's got lucky so far.

    Here's the side reveal, where we learn that indeed, the left block is tighter than the others, the right block showing only big whispy streaks of grain, and the middle, while having reasonably good grain, is cut pretty crooked with respect to it.

    The bottom of the blocks shows all this even more:

    The right block is the best cut, nearly perfect, but not the tightest grain for a smooth - it will blast impeccably. The middle block will make an interesting pipe and with work still possibly a well-oriented one, but it will take a bit of trickery. The left block is a nice cut but the growth is a little twistier - still the block of choice and ought to make a very fine looking piece. But almost all this info was available at a glance at the crust, to someone with experience.

    Continue if you will Ken - I'll give you a hint too - each of the three is from a different mill. Where are the blocks from??

    Posted 1 year ago #
  24. sasquatch

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    Frontal too.... again bearing out everything Ken saw at a glance.

    Ken and I haven't colluded in any way here, he could have stayed quiet, but the truth is, he knew exactly what he was looking at and his assessment was a low risk thing.

    So far we have talked about grain. Actual physical density is another thing, and tiny little flavor nuances another.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  25. dmcmtk

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    Sas and Ken, this is great, just sitting back and reading the back and forth!

    Dave
    Duke Street Irregular
    Posted 1 year ago #
  26. kenbarnes

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    I think I was sort of joking about which saw mill each came from and I doubt that I will get it.
    The left one (the nicest prime cut one) possibly a 'Super block' from Mimmo? The middle one from Jaume Hom and the one on the right from Manno

    Posted 1 year ago #
  27. bluegrassbrian

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    I like this game.

    Tobacco's a help because it clears the mind
    But like all your friends it is vilified
    They always say, the right amount's fine
    Posted 1 year ago #
  28. sablebrush52

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    Thread of the decade! Why am I not surprised that Ken can see in the dark? I mean, his father ran Charatan and Ken grew up in the pipe making business. He's been widely acknowledged as one of the finest cutters ever to grace the field and he co-founded Upshall. What would he know about reading blocks?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  29. civilwar

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    I agree, "Best thread in months". I've read the posts several times.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  30. crashthegrey

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    Suddenly I won't be surprised if the mills are correct as well.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  31. sasquatch

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    Well reasoned and very close, Ken. Left Block is from Carlo at Calabria, middle is Jaume, right is a Mimmo grade 3.

    I wasn't kidding when I earlier said that if you have the money, the cutters have the goods - I happened to get that block from Carlo, I could have got it from Mimmo or Makis too. And it's about a 50 dollar block from any of those guys.

    Mimmo grades a little differently than some, he has a super grade, a very good grade, a blast grade, and a "try your luck" grade. The block pictured is a #3 Blast grade, and it is cut just perfectly as many of Mimmo's are. Grain density isn't there, so the grade is lower. Usually the rings on this low-density wood are spread out more too, so the blasting depth is better than on a really tight growth.

    How will it smoke?

    In my experience, all these vendors have wood that smokes fine. I might.... might... be able to guess a mill or a region on a 1st smoke of a pipe. Sometimes the greek blocks have an earthiness that the Italian ones tend not to. But after 5 smokes? I couldn't telly you a thing. I've got pipes that are very dense/heavy and which smoke great, and I've got pipes which are very light for their size and which... smoke great. I tend to think that briar is NOT the biggest factor in how a pipe will smoke. Lots of high-grade guys will offer the mantra "The stem is the pipe." Certainly true in the case of the old British makes - Dunhill, Sasieni, Barling, GBD etc... all superior stem internals, and all terrific smokers. But the idea that Dunhill or anyone has a block-smelling dog or some kind of x-ray machine or that they twirl the blocks above their head at midnight to make them smoke better (at least in the northern hemisphere) is all goofy. It's briar, some is good, some is full of pits and holes and sand and spots of washy grain etc.

    What would Dunhill make with the blocks I posted? A DR, a Root, and a Shell, in that order, most likely. But any of them could be firewood half way through, and the Grade 3 block might render a nice smooth all the same (it did, if I remember right).

    Posted 1 year ago #
  32. warren

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    A fascinating exhibition! Thank you gentlemen.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  33. rmpeeps

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    All in all this thread has great information and I appreciate that it comes from professionals.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  34. sablebrush52

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    So, I have a question for the pros. After you buy your briar, how long do you season it before shaping, and do you go through more than one seasoning pass before you finish the pipe? The reason I'm asking this is that it used to be part of the process that some makers used. This is an image of Barling's bowl seasoning and storage room. The bowls have been turned, but not finished.

    My understanding, from talking with some of the old timers, was that the successive seasonings were thought to benefit dimensional stability despite changes in environment. Think of it as, the fit between the stem and shank will remain stable through use, and a shank crack is not likely to develop. As has been pointed out, there's wood. But there's also process, and that can make a difference in how well the wood performs.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  35. jvnshr

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    Ken and sasquatch no matter what, you two are going to heaven for sure. Thanks for the great thread.

    Other than that, I had to edit out some posts from this thread (the posts that has been removed either were 'unnecessary' or related to those 'unnecessary' posts). Let's leave our personal preferences aside and enjoy this legendary thread.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  36. User has not uploaded an avatar

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    just wanted to add my thanks to Ken & Sas
    thanks for a great thread

    Posted 1 year ago #
  37. jvnshr

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    Watching Ken talking about pipes/briar is like watching Ronnie O'Sullivan playing snooker.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  38. sasquatch

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    Let's start with what works - I have explored the pipe world in earnest for about 10 years, hunting that ultimate smoking experience. Learned a bit, I think, at fairly large cost over the years. I'll cut to the chase - the best smoker you can just go out and buy off the rack is a Castello. Time and time again. So that's air cured Italian briar. Can you subject a pipe to any number of processes during construction? Yeah, you could soak it, boil it, put it on a shelf, put it in the dryer... I don't care, it won't be a better smoker than that Castello. I've had oil-cured Shells, you name it. It's all bullshit, all gimmicks. Good wood, good construction, good pipe.

    If you think back to some of these curing processes, some of them started as ways to hurry the air-cure, or ways to treat otherwise inferior briar (reading Alf's old Shell patent documents, that's the feeling I was left with - he had some briar he didn't like so much). If you are moving 400,000 pipes a year, you are buying a lot of wood, and no one, NO one, ever sat on 10 wearhouses of 1000000 blocks each for 30 years or any of that silly crap. Wood gets dumped off the truck, zipped into pipes and sold. So any process that might unify, expidite or in some other way help (say, by finding bowls that are prone to cracking before they are sold) is going to be implemented.

    An artisan pipe is inspected, hand held, 10" from the guy's face, for 10 hours. If the briar isn't good, he'll know. I had a block once, I cut it, smelled like a swamp. Bluck. I kid not. I threw it out! Big factory makes that into a pipe and sells it.

    To answer the question directly, I try to let my blocks sit 2 years - this is Mimmo's recommendation as being the steepest part of the curve, and I agree with him. The wood seems more stable, harder, etc. Seems to smoke uniformally well. So new wood just goes into drawers or onto the shelf at my place. There is lots of older wood available - some is great, some is not so great, but I have some on hand for those who want it. But again, I don't think after 3 smokes anyone could tell the difference between 3 year old Ligurian briar and 10 year old Tuscan. And I'm happy to make and sell a pair of pipes to anyone who wants to explore this.

    Good wood (non-swamp), good drilling, good stem work (clean airway), good smoker. It really is that simple, but we LOVE our myths, we love the midnight briar, we love the magic dip, the secret rights, the provenance of pipery. It's hard to shake out.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  39. sablebrush52

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    Thanks for the info!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  40. cosmicfolklore

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    If you are moving 400,000 pipes a year, you are buying a lot of wood

    Is this an actual number from a particular year? Or, just hyperbole for the sake of dialog? I didn't think that even Savinelli was moving that many pipes a year.

    Michael
    Posted 1 year ago #
  41. jpberg

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    I’ll stretch way out on the thin limb and assume it’s hyperbole. 4,000, 40,000, 400,000. Does the number of zeros change the crux of the post?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  42. jvnshr

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    The Missouri Meerschaum Company's factory currently produces 3,500 pipes per day and ships these pipes to every U.S. state and several foreign countries.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  43. jaytex969

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    Cobs grow in 100 days, not 100 years....

    Gunner, Black Frigate. Say "Hello" to my little friend!
    Posted 1 year ago #
  44. sasquatch

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    I'll have to check, but I didn't mean for the 400,000 number to be hyperbole, it's a number I have in my head with regard to yearly production in the heyday of one of the big houses, but I can't remember which, why, or where I got the number.

    Castello makes 4000 pipes a year with 6 guys on the floor. Mechanize it more and put 60 guys on the floor, I don't think 100,000 is hard, I suspect Peterson still does something like that in a year.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  45. sasquatch

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    Again, just quickly here, from pipedia:

    "More recentely Gubbels got known as producer of the Porsche¹ and Bugatti design pipes. Elbert Gubbels & Zonen B.V. is one of the worldwide biggest pipe producers today. Annually 250,000 - 300,000 pipes are made by ca. 60 employees. More than 70% of the production is exported."

    Posted 1 year ago #
  46. npod

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    Fantastic thread. I’ve been following since it started. I’ve nothing to add, but letting y’all know it’s being followed.

    Neal
    Posted 1 year ago #
  47. beefeater33

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    This is a wonderful thread! Lot's of good information. FWIW, there's an article on smokingpipes.com about Dunhill which states that in 1924 Dunhill was selling 240,000 pipes a year through its Duke St. store.............. I can only wager that the number grew quite a bit by the 1950's-60's.........

    "We are the music makers, and we are the dreamers of the dream..."
    Willy Wonka
    Posted 1 year ago #
  48. saltedplug

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    Good wood (non-swamp), good drilling, good stem work (clean airway), good smoker. It really is that simple, but we LOVE our myths, we love the midnight briar, we love the magic dip, the secret rights, the provenance of pipery. It's hard to shake out.

    I'm with you exactly. It's hard for me to know my feelings about pipe quality. When I was young in the addiction, I read with avidity the opinions of my elders who said superior pipes had one or another quality making them so: the wood, the "engineering," (a completely inflated term for drilling a straight channel that enters the chamber bottom-center), the stem, etc. In my smoking only the drilling was important, though I did come to appreciate a comfortable stem.

    I was told that Ashtons, Castellois, .etc., were superior, and given that the prices of artisan pipes range from expensive to stratospheric, surely they must smoke better. But they just don't, though I wish they did. Wouldn't it be grand if you could own and enjoy such a pipe?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  49. sasquatch

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    Better than what, a basket pipe with a pinched stem and a rough tenon?

    I'll put my money on the Castello. (In fact I do once in awhile.)

    Posted 1 year ago #
  50. sablebrush52

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    So, there's no value to how the parts fit together along the airway, or how a stem is shaped? It may be a high falutin' term to refer to "engineering" when talking about pipes, but I'll accept it, considering the variable approaches that different carvers take.

    Still, there's a bit of the unknown in all of this. You can produce a pipe by the numbers and one will smoke better than its mate. Briar doesn't arrive prefabricated.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  51. warren

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    Didn't we go through this discussion with regard to the use of the term "engineering" some time ago? POd some degreed engineers we did.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  52. psperrytops

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    I want to thank all of you for the wonderful responses. I have learned more about briar reading this thread than I could have gleaned in a hundred years of internet searches (perhaps an exaggeration). Ken's insights and knowledge are phenomenal. I am definitely going to explore Upshall when it comes to my next purchase, and I see from their website that they are just becoming available in the US. Still blown away by the amazing discussion here. I am thrilled the discussion moved into aging briar as that would have been my next question. Thanks, everybody.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  53. kenbarnes

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    I am definitely going to explore Upshall when it comes to my next purchase, and I see from their website that they are just becoming available in the US

    Hi psperrytops. I started James Upshall in 1978 with craftsman Barry Jones (from Charatan). They first became available in the U.S. in 1979. Regrettably the factory closed down some years ago.
    Today, I spent the day with Barry Jones at the factory, looking for more stuff I can save before it gets 'binned'.
    We had a great day today and I brought eight of my new pipes along for his inspection. He thought that they were 1st class! I told him that I had the best teacher ever - a really top flight craftsman who had such amazing patience with me in the very early days at Charatan (1974-1975) and the next phase of our journey at James Upshall. We have had lots of laughs today and, on leaving, I felt quite sad that the factory looked so run down and... it's the end of an era.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  54. User has not uploaded an avatar

    gnarlybriar

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    I too learned a LOT from this post! Thank you Ken and Sas!
    Just an aside: At one of the CORPS Expos years ago, we hosted a "pipe makers' forum" for the audience to "learn what pipe makers (attending) did to their briar, how they picked what would be good smokes, etc.

    We got responses such as: I (the pipemaker) lick the briar - if it tastes sweet, it will be a sweet smoking pipe! Another was "sand a little off of the sides of the block - snort the sawdust slightly as if it were snuff - and if it is dry and reminds me of bread, it will smoke great!" Another was "turn a straight grain block on it's side, create a pipe with as much birdseye as possible - that will make the best smoker." These responses were from, at the time, revered US pipe makers!

    Funny, neither Sas or Ken mentioned any of those.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  55. sasquatch

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    Rainer Barbi would tell about having blocks that smelled like baking bread when he cut them, and he swore that these always made remarkable pipes, pipes that the customer would rave about.

    I'm convinced he was utterly full of crap, and intentionally so - a shyster (scheisster in this case!). A very German style of joke actually. How many star-struck pipesters asked that question, over and over.... I'm convinced he made up an ingenuous sounding answer that was completely unproveable (unfalsifiable too) and laughed his ass off. Eventually these "rumors" must have gone through all of pipedom, and anyone ever to cut a block of briar would be smelling away, hoping for that bready smell. They all smell like that, really, when you cut 'em.

    It's good fun.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  56. warren

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    Wow! You got a couple of carvers to cough up secrets not normally shared with even other carvers. I'm impressed!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  57. mso489

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    Thanks kenbarnes for all the inside info from one who has dug briar by hand himself. It looks like heavy heavy labor and if the briar harvesters had leverage on their price, pipes would cost a lot more. It looks like a job for the very young and fit. Just getting to the product is a trek.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  58. weezell

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    Very nice and informative thread! Thanks to all...

    "the weez"...
    Posted 1 year ago #
  59. bonanzadriver

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    Great thread.

    Thanks to all who participated.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  60. orlandofurioso

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    Just read this amazing thread . Thank you distinguished gentlemen !
    This is the kind of thread we thrive on.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  61. sasquatch

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    I've cut 2/3 of my posted blocks, and quite likely will cut the third today... once I have pics of all the pipes I'll post 'em up for fun.

    Interestingly, I've been reading Dunhill's "About Smoke", the 1928 version, and there's quite a bit of talk about Alfred's preference for the tight, hard Calabrian briar (mentioned by name) over the softer Algerian, and how the Shell pipe came about as a way to toughen (and frankly use up) the Algerian briar he had on hand. Pretty fascinating stuff. (And again, no mention of oil curing the smooth pipes - only the Shells).

    Posted 4 months ago #
  62. cosmicfolklore

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    Great thread. I have enjoyed reading and re-reading it as it has progressed. Sasquatch, I seem to be the only one who doesn't know your work. Do you mind telling me/us who you work for or what name to look for your pipes under?

    Posted 4 months ago #
  63. orlandofurioso

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    Yes Sas, please tell us

    Again, the US Dunhill patents concerning oil curing and blasting, very interesting read :

    https://www.folloder.com/pdf/1341418.pdf

    Posted 4 months ago #
  64. rdavid

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    Hey Cosmic. For your info: BST Pipes

    Think that's the right place... From the Scott Piersel eat's puppies thread.

    "May my last breath be drawn through a pipe, and exhaled in a jest." Charles Lamb
    Posted 4 months ago #
  65. cosmicfolklore

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    Thanks, for some reason I was getting mixed up on the Sasquatch Instagram member who posts pipes and the guy at Cupofjoes and here. So many Sasquatches.
    Hmmm, ...eats puppies. Did I miss one this weekend?

    Posted 4 months ago #
  66. rdavid

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    Hmmm, ...eats puppies. Did I miss one this weekend?

    Yeah, it was last week sometime. Trying to find it but search reveals nothing. Pretty funny thread. Maybe it was deleted?

    Posted 4 months ago #
  67. rdavid

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    Scottie Piersel eats puppies

    Posted 4 months ago #
  68. orlandofurioso

    orlandofurioso

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    Bringing old ( really interesting ) threads back to life is getting the better of me.
    Should I quit ?

    Posted 4 months ago #
  69. rdavid

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    Bringing old ( really interesting ) threads back to life is getting the better of me.
    Should I quit ?

    Heck no... I missed that one. Absolutely fascinating read. Now I want an Upshall, a Castello and defininately a Squatch pipe.

    Posted 4 months ago #
  70. orlandofurioso

    orlandofurioso

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    Not yet a clue bout Squatch pipes, but some of my best smokers are Castello's ( the virgin briar ones are heaven ) and JU's !
    Are the Squatch yours Sas ? The website is terrific.

    Posted 4 months ago #

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