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Blended Scotch Suggestions

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  1. profpar

    profpar

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    During this year I have become acquainted with the "Water of Life" aka whisk(e)y. I have tried bourbon (Makers Mark and Fireball), Irish whiskey (Tullamore Dew) and now a blended Scotch (Duggans Dew). of these the blended Scotch has the most wonderful flavor. (A single-malt is not in budget). I. Am wondering what other Scotch blends I might try in the future. Any suggestions?

    Posted 4 years ago #
  2. peckinpahhombre

    peckinpahhombre

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    Famous Grouse makes a decent blended scotch. Johnny Walker Black is also quite drinkable (I would avoid JW Red). My favourite blended scotch is Chivas Regal, though it's on the pricier side for a blended whisky.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  3. weezell

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    Dewars...

    "the weez"...
    Posted 4 years ago #
  4. profpar

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    Thanks. I will be looking for these at my local beverage store going forward.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  5. davet

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    Glenfidditch is the only Scotch I buy and not often. I don't get into it very often but some things you don't scrimp on, scotch, steak and fly rods etc.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  6. peckinpahhombre

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    Interesting postscript on Famous Grouse. It was of course Margaret Thatcher's drink of choice and during production of the film The Iron Lady, the filmakers used period authentic bottles for the different time periods depicted in the film.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  7. pitchfork

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    If they still make it, Clan McGregor is definitely in your budget. Chivas Regal and Famous Grouse are better, but haven't bought them in years, so not sure how much they cost these days.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  8. beefeater33

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    Try a bottle of Old Pultaney. Its a single malt, but priced about the same as the blends........
    Its good stuff, been around a long time, and to me much better than the blended stuff in the same price range...

    "We are the music makers, and we are the dreamers of the dream..."
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    Posted 4 years ago #
  9. hugodrax

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    Buchanan's 12 is absurdly cheap and really quite good. Otherwise, it's Black Label all the way for me.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  10. mortonbriar

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    I prefer single malt, but find dewars to be quite delicous and very affordable

    I don't really care if the cup is half full or half empty, I just want something to sip on.
    Posted 4 years ago #
  11. cgrd

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    You may want to check out "Pure Malt" blends. This means it's blended from single malts, and the year indicates none of them would be aged less. For example, Glendower's Pure Malt 8 year means it's blended from single malts aged for 8 or more years. The result is a delicious whiskey that punches far above its weight for the price. A bottle of Glendower will set me back $40 in Canada, compared to the $30 a bottle of Famous Grouse would cost.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  12. philobeddoe

    Philo Beddoe

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    A bottle of Laphroaig 10 yr. costs me $40.00 at my local liquor store, most decent blends are going to run somewhere near that, so single malts may not be as highly priced as you have been led to believe. I can think of at least twenty very good single malts that can be had for less than $50.00 a bottle. You don't have to spend $100.00+ to get a wonderful single malt whisky.

    "So it goes." - K.V.
    Posted 4 years ago #
  13. alexnorth

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    The naked grouse is a decent blended but I agree with poster above, you don't need to spend a fortune to get a decent single malt. There are good blend available though, I've heard good things about monkey shoulder for example

    Posted 4 years ago #
  14. chasingembers

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    Glenlivet and Glenfidditch here.

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    - H. P. Lovecraft
    Posted 4 years ago #
  15. johnnyreb

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    Prof,

    Try Ballantine. It's at the price point you are probably looking for; you can even get it at the grocery store; and it's much better than most at that price point.

    Rebels been rebels since I don't know when
    Posted 4 years ago #
  16. jimbo44

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    Difficult to say which is best as they taste differently depending on the base malts used in the blend - White Horse uses Lagavulin, Johnny Walker uses Cardhu, for example - very different.

    I agree with Peck that Chivas Regal is one of the best (but one of the most expensive) as it is a blend of malts with less grain whisky. In UK, Famous Grouse and Teachers are also favoured.

    Try a few in all price ranges(except anything that comes in a plastics bottle!).

    Posted 4 years ago #
  17. lochinvar

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    Try Black Bottle. Its heavy on the Islay malts.

    Posted 4 years ago #
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    drunkblowhard

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    I'm new here, and EXTREMELY cautious about shooting my mouth off about anything pipe related because I'm a complete pipe rookie and I'm here to lurk and learn.

    Whisk(e)y however... That happens to be my profession.

    Some of the above posters are 100 percent right, a single malt doesn't need to cost an arm and a leg. I think the best bang for the buck single malt on the market is Deanston Virgin Oak. I don't remember if it has an age statement on the bottle or not, but it's a single malt that will run you in the neighborhood of 35 bucks. And it has the added benefit of being absolutely delicious.

    If blended is how you want to go however, then I would love to steer you towards a very small segment of the market that are called "pure malts" or "vatted malts." Without getting way too nerdy for anyone's good, these are one hundred percent blended malt whiskies, and are super delicious. Two that come to mind are called Hogshead and Sheepdip. There aren't a lot of vatted malts on the market, and they're not the easiest to find, but a little bit of legwork on your end will be greatly rewarded.

    Basically it's the same advice that I have seen the pipe community give to new pipe smokers, find a great brick-and-mortar (booze) shop with people who know what they're talking about. They will either have these gems in stock, or be willing and able to find them for you.

    Be sure to add an ice cube or a little bit of water, sit back, and enjoy!

    Cheers!

    Posted 4 years ago #
  19. agnosticpipe

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    My favorite blended scotch is White Horse, about $15 a bottle around here, but I like Black Bottle too, even though it's about $10 more. Don't let the low prices fool you, as these are very nice drinkable scotches. Once or twice a year I come up enough coin to get a bottle of single malt. I always go for something from Islay as I really love the rich, smoky flavors of them.

    The pipe smoker formerly know as agnostic pipe
    "Fried food, hard liquor, and tobacco, that's the holy trinity!"- Stacy Keach
    Posted 4 years ago #
  20. brudnic1

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    I second Hugodrax. Buchanan's excellent value.

    Doña Agatha bat Tedesco
    Posted 4 years ago #
  21. weezell

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    Grand McNish(Cheap!)...

    Posted 4 years ago #
  22. tarak

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    Johnny Walker Black is decent.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  23. yaddy306

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    I'd spend my money on Johnnie Walker Black, The Black Grouse (a peaty version of Famous Grouse) or Teachers.
    Or Chivas if my budget were larger.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  24. brass

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    Clan McGregor is drinkable, although very, very light. Good party Scotch and summer backyard scotch. But is also light on the pocketbook - probably the cheapest blend you can find that isn't gutter water.

    Famous Grouse may be the best value blended Scotch. It is the most popular Scotch sold in Scotland and I would daresay the Scots would know their whiskey best.

    When you're ready to splurge, Wine and Spirits rated the top two blended Scotches 95. One of two was priced at $2500 per bottle. The second was Buchanon 18 Year Old, which goes for about $75 per bottle. I wouldn't pay $2500 for a bottle of booze even if I had that kine of money to throw away. But the Buchanon is relatively affordable and is top, top shelf. I can't think of a blend I like better.

    Do check with your local B&M and ask them what they have in the way of vat Scotches aka single malt blends. BTW, Johnny Walker Blues is, I believe, a vat Scotch and is better than most single malts - as it should be, for $200 bucks a bottle.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  25. derfatdutchman

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    For a blended Scotch I'll cast another vote for Chivas Regal.

    "The value of tobacco is best understood when it is the last you possess, and there is no chance of getting more."
    Bismark
    Posted 4 years ago #
  26. apatim

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    I enjoy Scotch... blended or single malt. Admittedly, my palate isn't very discriminating so I find little value in spending big bucks. Famous Grouse and Dewars White Label do the trick for me.

    Johnnie Walker Black is quite good but for just a few dollars more, I prefer Double Black. Another in the same price range that I recommend is Glenmorangie The Original (a Highland Single Malt) - very smooth.

    Enjoying my days on earth.

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    Posted 4 years ago #
  27. uberam3rica

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    When I happen to find myself in a cheap bar, J&B(aka Justerini & Brooks) or Dewars White label are my go to drink. They're cheap, and not half bad in my opinion.

    As long as I got a pipe full of baccy and a nose full of snuff, I'm a happy camper
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    Posted 4 years ago #
  28. shaintiques

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    I think the best blended scotch on the market is called Monkey Shoulder. Monkey Shoulder is a mix of three different Single Malts - Glenfiddich, Balvenie and Kininvie - and is great with mixers or just on its own. Smooth, sweet and very easy to drink.

    I know what I need, smoke, I can't recall the last time I tasted it....Gandalf in the mines of Moria.

    "we shall have to share pipes, as good friends must at a pinch'....'I keep a treasure or two near my skin, as precious as rings to me. Here's one: my old wooden pipe. And here's another an unused one...He held up a small pipe with a wide flattened bowl, and handed it to Gimli. 'Does that settle the score between us', said Merry. 'Most noble hobbit, it leaves me deep in your debt."
    Posted 4 years ago #
  29. andrew

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    Dewars white label
    Teachers if you like smokey salty (it's called the poor man's Johnny Black I've heard)
    Famous grouse
    Black grouse-another good smokey bar-b-que flavor
    Those are some bottom shelf good picks in my opinion.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  30. derfargin

    derfargin

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    I'm throw another vote in for Famous Grouse. That's usually my go to for a blended Scotch.

    There are 10 types of people in this world, those who understand binary, and those who don't.
    Posted 4 years ago #
  31. profpar

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    Thank you all for your suggestions and input.. I am definitely going to be looking for the brands noted at my local beverage store. I hope they carry famouse grouse, anxious to try that blend. I also want to sample some of the other blends mentioned going forward. Like a kid in a candy shop. I am also encouraged to know that there may be single malts within range. I had not considered these because I thought that the single malt was something I could only dream about.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  32. seadogontheland

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    A little of the beaten path, but a good inexpensive blend is Canadian Club.

    Life is good...I have truly been blessed.
    Posted 4 years ago #
  33. seadogontheland

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  34. checotah

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    Blended are ok, but I find some of the single malt to be only slight higher priced, but so much better in taste. I will take Glefiddich or Bowmore 12 year olds over any blended, any day. If you were closer, I'd deliver a bottle meself, just to temp you into the good stuff.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  35. maxx

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    I'm curious to try Monkey Shoulder. Today I bought a 750ML bottle of Famous Grouse, which I used to get fairly often. It was $11 less than Monkey Shoulder. I almost got White Horse for a buck more, but wanted to reacquaint myself with FG, since it was recommended here. It tastes a bit thin. I'd like to move away from the grain whisky dilution of Scotch flavor. It seems like an alcohol filler, to my mind. Still, it's a much more pleasant drink than the Benchmark Bourbon I had a week or two ago. But I do prefer Scotch over Bourbon. Plus, it goes better on my palate with pipe tobacco.

    "Curiosity is one of the most permanent and certain characteristics of a vigorous intellect."
    ~ Samuel Johnson ~
    Posted 4 years ago #
  36. ohin3

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    No one has mentioned one of the best kept secrets when it comes to very affordable blended whisky... Find yourself a bottle of "Te Bheag" such a well made blended whisky.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  37. maxx

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    Got some White Horse this evening, "a fine matured blend containing at its heart the unique flavor of LAGAVULIN single malt whisky from the island of Islay in the Herbrides." This is as close as I'll get to Lagavulin for a while. I like this much more than Famous Grouse.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  38. profpar

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    Update. Just about finished with a bottle of Teachers Highland Cream. plan on trying famouse gross or black gross next. so many whiskies to try. Such is research.. I also had a chance to sample a single malt. I now know what I want for Christmas. I find I enjoy these whiskies best neat. My father used to mix whisky with ginger ale. while the whisky no doubt imensley improved the gingerale, it is dubious that the whisky benefited from the ginger ale.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  39. drezz01

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    I'm glad you are enjoying the scotch journey!

    Although some may call it sacrilege, a small amount of water in to neat scotch is IMHO the best way to enjoy a fine dram. The higher the proof, the more water you can add. I'm not talking much, 1/4 tsp for low proof scotches, 1/2 tsp for cask strength (though these amounts change blend by blend). A high proof scotch will anesthetize your tongue, reducing your ability to suss out the flavours. When you add a small amount you will notice the scotch will get a little bit of foggy wisps where the water and scotch meets. My understanding of this is that it is esters falling out of solution - this will improve the bouquet, and as your olfactory affects taste, your experience of the scotch will improve.

    I may be greatly misrepresenting this science, as it is beyond me, but I have been greatly enjoying my blends with a small amount of water and letting them sit for ~15min.

    There is a great synopsis on this blog post and the sources at the end expand upon it for the scientifically inclined among you.
    See Post

    Posted 4 years ago #
  40. profpar

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    Not sure why esters would come out of coalition when water is added. A ester {R-(C=O)-0-R'} is a H-bond acceptor and hence esters so,unless in alcohol should be quite soluble in a mixture of water and alcohol. Perhaps the addition of water reduces the vapor pressure of the alcohol making the vapor richer in the esters. should mention that I am a chemist.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  41. drezz01

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    Awesome! This is the abstract from the paper that the blog post linked to, make any sense to you?

    Abstract
    Equilibration of a flavour volatile between a distilled spirit and the headspace is a two-stage process. The first equilibrium occurs between the bulk solution and the headspace spirit interface, and the second between the surface layer and the headspace. The first stage is represented by the activity coefficient of the flavour volatile, which, for hydrophobic compounds, is greatly reduced by the aggregation of ethanol molecules in aqueous solution. The second equilibrium is governed by the vapour pressure of the solute and the ambient temperature and pressure. In mixed saturated solutions the composition of the surface layer and consequently the headspace is determined by the concentration and activity coefficients of the mixture components. Components of wood extract were found to act principally on the first equilibrium. Ethanol lignin acted in the same manner as high molecular weight esters and alcohols of the distillate, displacing volatile components from the surface layer. The suppressant effect of ethanol lignin was lost at 37 °C and consequently would only be important in nosing of spirit samples. Wood extract was found to decrease the critical point for the aggregation of ethanol, resulting in reduced activity coefficients for ethyl decanoate from 5 to 30% ethanol at both 25 and 37 °C. This effect would reduce the spirit–mouthspace partition coefficient with the resulting decreased release of flavour volatile in the mouth. This mechanism would explain the decreased impact of undesirable, immature aromas when wood matured spirits are consumed. © 1999 Society of Chemical Industry

    Posted 4 years ago #
  42. profpar

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    Actually it makes perfect sense. Ithe decrease in the activity coefficient refers to a drop in effective concentration. the ethyl decorate molecules must be forming associations with each other, and so decrease their volatility. Interesting.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  43. thomasmartin

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    Santori Hibiki is sublime. Although neither Scotch nor cheap.

    Thomas
    Posted 4 years ago #
  44. johnnyreb

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    Although some may call it sacrilege, a small amount of water in to neat scotch is IMHO the best way to enjoy a fine dram. The higher the proof, the more water you can add. I'm not talking much, 1/4 tsp for low proof scotches, 1/2 tsp for cask strength (though these amounts change blend by blend). A high proof scotch will anesthetize your tongue, reducing your ability to suss out the flavours. When you add a small amount you will notice the scotch will get a little bit of foggy wisps where the water and scotch meets. My understanding of this is that it is esters falling out of solution - this will improve the bouquet, and as your olfactory affects taste, your experience of the scotch will improve.

    The best way to adjust neat scotch to your liking is with a glass of ice chips served on the side. Spoon in a few ice chips and allow them to melt; repeat as needed. It is much easier to adjust and not over-water your drink than it is by adding water or ice cubes. As you say it doesn't take much.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  45. wyfbane

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    @ johnnyreb: That's how I was taught, as well.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  46. drezz01

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    Actually it makes perfect sense

    Could you provide a layman's explanation of all of that Greek for us less chemistry-minded?

    The best way to adjust neat scotch to your liking is with a glass of ice chips served on the side

    That's a pretty good idea! I have been using an old ornate spoon (from my mothers spoon collection which I convinced her to give to me as a child) and a small glass of water but it's not the most precise and not easily modulated.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  47. tslex

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    @drunkblowhard:

    Welcome to the forum.

    Your comment fascinated me. What part of the industry are you in?

    For many years I was a drinker of indiscriminate bourbons and Tennessee whiskeys. Then, about a dozen years ago, i started to dedicate myself to learning more about whiskey (and whisky) when I became partners with a bunch of guys who are oenophiles (latin for "insufferable wine snobs") and I decided that if I were to hold up my non-wine-drinking end of things, I'd better get some knowledge.

    In the years since I've become fairly studied on the subject, and expanded my palate substantially. My wife tells hosts and friends: "Brown whiskey. He drinks anything brown." Well, not quite, but Irish whiskey, single malt scotch and -- more latterly -- now find happy congress with all the corn liquor in my cabinets.

    A partner of the wine variety recently said thank you to me for a favor with a bottle of Lagavulin 16 and I knew my work here was -- if not done -- at least well begun. (Oh but I do love Islays, Lag 16 most of all.)

    So that's my amateur whiskey student story. Now tell me/us about you.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  48. tslex

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    @profpar Let me add my +1 to the suggestion of Deanston as a very affordable single malt that tastes way above its pay grade.

    While you're experimenting, note that there is a tremendous renaissance in ryes right now. I like mine on ice and the peppery spice of the best ones is a pleasure. (Manhattan and Bulleit are nice.) One nifty thing about rye? It's what our dads drank. (Well mine, who was born in 1920. But you know. . . .)

    @drezz01 I think the rule is, "It's your fookin Scotch. drink it as you like."

    And yes, a small drop of water is a fine thing to add. The chemistry majors above seem to have detailed explanations that make sense (orgo was 35 years ago, Lord help me). I have this nifty little pitcher from which I am able to pour the littlest bit of water. I don't do that with every dram, but it can make a difference.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  49. johnnyreb

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    That's a pretty good idea! I have been using an old ornate spoon (from my mothers spoon collection which I convinced her to give to me as a child)

    I usually have a double dram and spoon in a quarter to a half teaspoon of ice chips. Let it sit for a few minutes to let it breathe & the ice chips will melt quickly without cooling down the scotch much. Otherwise for me it's too easy to over water the flavor profile. If you pour a bigger scotch (Scotch on the Rocks) with ice cube(s) it takes a while for the bigger ice cube(s) to melt, they will cool the scotch too much & over water when they do finally melt if you can wait that long.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  50. monty55

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    The only blended scotch I've had that I liked at all was Johnny Walker Blue Label. It's a step above the Black label.

    Posted 4 years ago #

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