Pipes Magazine » General Discussion

Search Forums  
   
Tags:   

Anyone Own Horses?

(95 posts)
  • Started 1 year ago by hunter185
  • Latest reply from sdcowboy
  1. sdcowboy

    sdcowboy

    Junior Member
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 99

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Yup. Sturgis is VERY crazy during the rally. I stay as far away as possible during that time. Rapid City is nuts too. Sturgis is a town of 7,000 people. It is the heart of the rally, but the swarms of people spill over into the neighboring towns. Sturgis is actually part of the Rapid City metro area.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  2. hunter185

    hunter185

    Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 219

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    If you guys really want to get away during the rally, come ride here! We've got thousands of miles of mountain trails. We could pack 20 miles back in the bush; you'll forget bikes even exist lol!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  3. sdcowboy

    sdcowboy

    Junior Member
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 99

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    If you guys really want to get away during the rally, come ride here! We've got thousands of miles of mountain trails. We could pack 20 miles back in the bush; you'll forget bikes even exist lol!

    Hunter, I'd love to get away and come up there. I think circumstances would prevent a long trip that time of year. My wife doesn't mind an occasional weekend camping trip with the guys, but I think she might object to a week long riding trip without her! She likes to camp and ride as well. Your offer is tempting...I could smuggle some tobacco over the border for you, too.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  4. freakiefrog

    freakiefrog

    Junior Member
    Joined: Dec 2012
    Posts: 93

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    We have two having beef cows we need the horses from time to time to work the cows, one is a 10 year old mare we named Dixie. She is 1/2 Quarter horse and 1/2 Mustang, she is short stocky and can go from standing to WOOO D*&* IT in .0001 seconds. The other is a 5 year old gelding Arabian named Eco. He is the cow chaser of the group and flat out he's as smooth as a zipper to ride, his brakes are what you have to watch for..Dixie is my two year old's buddy. Every time she sees him she stands at the fence nickering and pawing the ground till we come and speak.

    I have some friends, some honest friends, and honest friends are few; My pipe of briar, my open fire, A book that's not too new.
    Robert W. Service
    Posted 1 year ago #
  5. sdcowboy

    sdcowboy

    Junior Member
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 99

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    We have two having beef cows we need the horses from time to time to work the cows, one is a 10 year old mare we named Dixie. She is 1/2 Quarter horse and 1/2 Mustang, she is short stocky and can go from standing to WOOO D*&* IT in .0001 seconds. The other is a 5 year old gelding Arabian named Eco. He is the cow chaser of the group and flat out he's as smooth as a zipper to ride, his brakes are what you have to watch for..Dixie is my two year old's buddy. Every time she sees him she stands at the fence nickering and pawing the ground till we come and speak.

    Frog, those sound like good horses. Eco sounds a lot like my paint, Dillon. He can be a bit of a handful to ride at times. He seems to have some loose skin on his belly, so I have to be careful cinching him up. If I don't work the skin folds out of the cinch area before I step on I can have a rodeo. He's never dumped me, but I don't bounce as well as I used to. I also like horses that go from standing to WOOOO D*&* IT in .0001 seconds. It makes life interesting.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  6. hunter185

    hunter185

    Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 219

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Hey Frog, post some pictures! My mare is mostly thoroughbred, so she can go from zero to 60 in .001 s, and we both love that, but she's really relaxed since her first kid. The rest of the herd is fairly calm. Tons of hours of ground work.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  7. hunter185

    hunter185

    Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 219

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    So, sd, plan a week here and bring the wife! Have extra horses, pack gear, etc. Would be awesome giving a tour of our mountains! Oh, I like the 'tobacco over the border' idea too! I'm still waiting for a pre Christmas TAD order...loosing hope that it snuck by the authorities. Autumn Evening was in the order on your recommendation lol!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  8. freakiefrog

    freakiefrog

    Junior Member
    Joined: Dec 2012
    Posts: 93

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Hey hunter I'll get some this weekend along our dumptruck of a bull Valentino. Here are some from back this spring
    My son and sister-in-law walking with the calved heifers. the white faced one is ubber heavy with calf in this shot.

    More cows.

    and my son doing it right. Bareback on Dixie (that's his horse..just as him)

    Posted 1 year ago #
  9. sdcowboy

    sdcowboy

    Junior Member
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 99

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Frog, your son is starting out right. Bareback is a lot of fun. Avoiding hitting the ground is a great motivator to develop your seat. That ground isn't as soft as it used to be!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  10. peckinpahhombre

    peckinpahhombre

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2012
    Posts: 5,061

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I own 4 horses. They are race horses. I don't ride any of them. The guys that do ride them are about 150 lbs lighter and about 2 feet shorter than me.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  11. sdcowboy

    sdcowboy

    Junior Member
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 99

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    So, sd, plan a week here and bring the wife! Have extra horses, pack gear, etc. Would be awesome giving a tour of our mountains! Oh, I like the 'tobacco over the border' idea too! I'm still waiting for a pre Christmas TAD order...loosing hope that it snuck by the authorities. Autumn Evening was in the order on your recommendation lol!

    You give me some interesting food for thought! Honestly it wouldn't work this summer. I just started a new business venture, and my wife just went into private law practice after 17 years as the county public defender. I'm afraid our new enterprises won't allow for a week away just yet. We could figure out the tobacco thing...plain package of "potpourri" and "hobby supplies".

    Posted 1 year ago #
  12. sdcowboy

    sdcowboy

    Junior Member
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 99

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Peckinpah, do you ever get the urge to climb on? Riding is a true rush!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  13. peckinpahhombre

    peckinpahhombre

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2012
    Posts: 5,061

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Not really. I never grew up around horses or large animals. When I visit them at the stable or in the paddock before a race, it truthfully freaks me out a bit. Maybe that's just thoroughbred race horses, but they always seem a tad bit too much "on edge" for my liking.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  14. hunter185

    hunter185

    Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 219

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Hey Frog, great picture. I had a friend bring her 4 and 6 year old over the other day. The horses loved it and they rode around bareback. The horses got it figured out: when the person on their back doesnt know how to ride, they just follow me!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  15. hunter185

    hunter185

    Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 219

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Hey pekinpah, I know a few people with 'off the track' thoroughbreds. Once they realize they don't have to 'work' anymore, they settle down and are great horses. My mare is a thoroughbred (closest one in pic below) and I wouldn't trade her for the world.

    So winter happened last night.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  16. hunter185

    hunter185

    Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 219

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Hey sd,
    Sounds like a busy year for you. I'm starting a couple new ventures as well, so it's going to be a busy one too. But I checked the mail today and my TAD order arrived, unaccosted! Yeehaw! I'd like to put SD on my list of horse travel destinations tho...just have to finalize a land purchase, house sale, then can go LQ trailer shoppin!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  17. sdcowboy

    sdcowboy

    Junior Member
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 99

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    But I checked the mail today and my TAD order arrived, unaccosted! Yeehaw! I'd like to put SD on my list of horse travel destinations tho...just have to finalize a land purchase, house sale, then can go LQ trailer shoppin!

    Woo Hoo! You can breathe out again after getting your TAD order. Sounds like you have a lot of irons in the fire as well. I'm in Texas getting ready to fly back home. We had a great meeting which will result in more business for my new venture!

    I enjoyed my LQ trailer shopping. Mine has a lot of scars after 8 years, but I can't find a better deal than what I have. It truly is our home away from home.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  18. hunter185

    hunter185

    Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 219

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I ordered Autumn Evening and a 4Noggins blend: Essence of Vermont. It has a really enticing pouch aroma, and got good reviews. Maybe today if its warm enough. -27C last night, but supposed to be +10 next week. Maybe a trip to the mountains is in order.
    Just working on a 20ac land purchase, house, barn, all set up for horses. I want to turn the upper part of the barn into a 2 story apartment, with a west facing balcony. Then I can sit out there on a nice evening with a good pipe and watch the horses and sunset!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  19. sdcowboy

    sdcowboy

    Junior Member
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 99

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Today is a good day to bump this thread up. Yesterday I continued the process of breaking my wife's 4 year old Friesian, Dirk. Here are a series of pictures that capture the moment. For those of you who have not done this before, there is a system that many trainers follow. You start on the ground to prepare the horse for the first ride.

    1. Ground Work--In this photo, I'm working Dirk in the round pen to get him relaxed and ready to work.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  20. sdcowboy

    sdcowboy

    Junior Member
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 99

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    2. Putting pressure in the stirrup and on his back--I've stepped up on the stirrup, and I'm balancing myself over his back from the "near" or left side. This is the side that horses are trained to be mounted from.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  21. sdcowboy

    sdcowboy

    Junior Member
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 99

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    3. Now its time to do the same thing on the other side. This is important so that he is accustomed to people mounting from either side.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  22. sdcowboy

    sdcowboy

    Junior Member
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 99

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    4. First time on his back! After working from the ground and putting pressure on either side, Dirk was ready for someone to sit on his back. He didn't fuss or offer to buck or anything like that.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  23. sdcowboy

    sdcowboy

    Junior Member
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 99

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    5. Last Photo! After switching to a bosal hackamore bridle, it was time for the first ride. I mounted up without incident, and we went for a nice ride around the round pen. He walked and trotted without incident. My wife then climbed aboard for her first ride on him. We have decided that Friesians are the Labradors of the horse world. They only want to please their owner/master. This is the second one I've broke, and this one was even easier than the first. He is a lot of fun!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  24. hunter185

    hunter185

    Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 219

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Right on! He looks like a pretty easy going feller! How tall is Dirk? I like your round pen. No legs getting caught in that! How long have you had him?

    I got on my colt today too - he's just shy of 3. He's 15hh now and still growin. Dad is 15.2 and Mom is 16. It's been a few weeks since I was on him. Just bareback with a halter...I was lazy.
    I do tons of groundwork with the new guys - but very little round pen or lunge line stuff. Mostly giving(relaxing) to pressure, and yielding to my space at different gaits. It's a great way to find their 'holes' and fix little things. Then getting on them is usually anti-climactic, which disappoints onlookers but is really nice for the rider LOL! I have a video of the first time I saddled and got on this colt...will have to find the link, it's on YouTube.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  25. sdcowboy

    sdcowboy

    Junior Member
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 99

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Hunter,

    Dirk is around 15.2 hands. We have had him for a little over a year. With Friesians, they mature slowly. If he was a quarter horse he would have been broke almost 2 years ago. He is 4 years old this year. Since Friesians mature slower, it is recommended that they are not ridden until they are 4.

    You're right, he is pretty easy going. He wants to please, and he acts like a big friendly dog. The breed tends to bond closely with the people in their lives.

    I think our groundwork philosphies are similar. Dirk has had a ton of groundwork both inside the round pen and outside. Most of it has been outside. On Saturday we worked primarily in the round pen because that is where I like to take a first ride. This way we can keep him moving in a circle without coming to a square corner.

    Forward movement can be an issue with Friesians. They are not buckers at all. The breed is somewhat lazy, and it can be hard to get them out of first gear. Dirk moves better than most that I've seen. He is also quite a bit smoother than my wife's mare (broke her 5 years ago).

    I agree about the onlookers. Most of them have a vision of horsebreaking that they've learned on TV and through movies. I'm too old to take a hard fall anymore, so I'm a nut about groundwork and preparation. The onlookers on Saturday were somewhat disappointed that he didn't buck at all. You're right about the anti-climax thought. If the groundwork is done gently with logical progression, the actual first ride is somewhat anti climactic.

    Posted 1 year ago #

Reply

You must log in to post.

 

 

    Back To Top  | Back to Forum Home Page

   Members Online Now
   pitchfork, dermotfahy, elpfeife, bulletsnbriars, woodsroad, dmcmtk, grouchydog, cmdrmcbragg, decigar, papajoe, derfargin, ericthered, tslex, natibo, mattsem, cosmicfolklore