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A Mauser Commercial

(58 posts)
  1. madox07

    madox07

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    Boy, was pipe smoking popular back in the day, or is the iconic huntsmen a pipe smoker?

    Sea Wolf Pipers

    "Like the mariners of old, a loner is acceptable but a pipe is best enjoyed in a pack"
    Posted 1 week ago #
  2. husky

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    When hunting it is important to keep track of the wind.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  3. mikethompson

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    Yes and yes.

    Also that bowl looks tiny in relation to his face.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  4. paulie66scandinavian

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    Didn't know Mauser pipes existed back then but those famous German Mauser rifles and pistols definitely did

    Paul The Scandinavian'
    Posted 1 week ago #
  5. ben88

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    I highly doubt it's a "pipe poster".

    Lasciate ogni speranza, voi ch’entrate
    Posted 1 week ago #
  6. mikethompson

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    Paul, I think the ad is for firearms and the pipe is just part of the hunters 'look'.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  7. mso489

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    The bowl is too small, and I think that is to de-emphasize the pipe, since it is a firearms ad. My paternal grandpa was a duck hunter and smoked a pipe. When he got too old to hike out, he stayed by the car, and on at least one occasion met the empty handed hunting party beside the car with several nice ducks he'd bagged.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  8. chilllucky

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    Husky - "When hunting it is important to keep track of the wind."

    But isn't it also important to not be smelled by your quarry?

    Posted 1 week ago #
  9. alaskanpiper

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    But isn't it also important to not be smelled by your quarry?

    This. I bring my pipe moose hunting, but only fire it up in camp at night. Part of the reason I love rope tobaccos. I can chew them in the field, and smoke them at night in camp. That and they are unspillable and can just be wiped off if dropped on the wet muskeg.

    I love these old hunting/pipe art posters, don't get me wrong, but since the man is holding an open site rifle (expecting a reasonably close shot at larger game on land) it is decidedly unrealistic that he would be actively smoking in the field if he actually plans on having any hope of harvesting any type of mammal with a nose.

    And also, as everyone else has so accurately states, that bowl belongs on a kiseru! The pipes I bring hunting are usually FAT tankards.

    "We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well that death will tremble to take us." ---Hank

    "Yeah, well, you know that's just like, uh, your opinion, man..." --- The Dude
    Posted 1 week ago #
  10. husky

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    But isn't it also important to not be smelled by your quarry?

    Yes but it depends on what type of hunt you are doing.
    In Sweden the annual moose hunt is a big thing. Primarily one takes a position
    at a known game path and wait for a moose to come by.
    It is not uncommon for a person to have the same post every year so they bring out firewood
    in advance and have a nice little campfire, boil some coffee and generally relax.
    For many people that is the main thing of moose hunting. Getting a few days on your own,
    sitting in nature and contemplate life. Like a week long bowl of tobacco...

    Alaskanpiper, I have that exact rifle, mauser 98 with open sights in 9,3x57!
    The main scandinavian moose and bear rifle from the fifties.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  11. paulie66scandinavian

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    @Husky, I know that Swedish Mauser,they manufactured this 98 in both countries Deustchland&Sweden whereas here(Finland)back in the days our Army issue was modified Mozhin & Nagan carabine 7,62 Russian mod.If You ask me I do like better this very Mauser

    Posted 1 week ago #
  12. jaytex969

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    I have the Finnish M39 Mosin variant and several Mausers.

    Don't underestimate the Finnish Mosin. The Finns refined the clunky Russian Mosins into very competent weapons.

    I'd be hard pressed to choose between the two for accuracy and reliability.

    Now, my Swiss K-31 would leave them all behind...

    You think you have enough guns.
    Then, the zombies come...

    Gunner, Black Frigate. Say "Hello" to my little friend!
    Posted 1 week ago #
  13. alaskanpiper

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    In Sweden the annual moose hunt is a big thing. Primarily one takes a position
    at a known game path and wait for a moose to come by.

    Moose here will sometimes stay in the same place for days on end. We tend to hunt them by going to known "bedding" locations and calling them out. We will try 3 or 4 locations per day until we get a response. Because we are often communicating with them, we try to avoid all scent whatsoever. If that bull has cows with him, and they catch one tiny hint that you may not actually be a moose, they will spook instantly and take the bulls with them. Sometimes all it takes for this to happen is the slightest breeze in the wrong direction, and you will never even know they were there. It still amazes me how a 1200 pound animal with 65 inch wide antlers can sprint through thick brush without making a sound.

    I can't go 5 feet in that stuff without making a racket.

    Aside from some parts of Canada, Sweden is the only place I've seen where the moose hunting culture seems to be as strong and avid as it is here in Alaska. All life revolves around it for a month. Although most of the pictures of moose I see from Sweden they look like much smaller bodied animals than the moose we take here. Not a lot of huge racks there, either eh?

    Alaskanpiper, I have that exact rifle, mauser 98 with open sights in 9,3x57!
    The main scandinavian moose and bear rifle from the fifties.

    That's awesome! I've got some pretty old stuff, mostly rugers and winchesters. I hunt now with a .300 win mag that was my father's gun, before that I used my grandfather's .30-06 from the 1940s. It has an awesome scope mount that allows you to site through the mounts to use the open sites if you are at close range. I love that old gun, but it proved a little light for a certain bear encounter. A man can only buy so many pairs of pants...

    Posted 1 week ago #
  14. husky

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    Moose in Sweden is a bit of a story.
    Yes we have a smaller subspecies than your alaskan moose and also a warmer climate resulting in smaller body size.
    In the beginning of the last century moose were very scarce, almost hunted to extinction by subsistence farmers.
    Some old people still remember when they were kids and someone in the parish had seen a moose track.
    It was a big event and everyone with a gun tried to get it. Old remington 1858 rolling blocks and later 1896 mausers
    were the common mans gun. With regulation of hunting many species started to recover.
    During the fifties we had a change of forestry practice on a national scale.
    The forests had been thinned into unproductive wastelands so all was clear cut and replanted.
    This resulted in the young stands becoming an unlimited source of food for moose and the population exploded.
    During the 80-ies we culled 120.000 moose annually and the beginning of the moose season became the largest homecoming event of the year. Sweden constitutes 2% of the global moose habitat but 50% of all moose killed during hunting are killed in Sweden.
    Now, apart from the moose being the most hunted game and an iconic national symbol it is also a traffic hazard and a major problem for forestry as the stands have now matured and there is only a fraction of the previous food available.
    The cull, as it is rather than hunt, keeps the population roughly in balance with forrest damage and risk of starvation.
    It is much more desirable to shoot a large male than a small one or a female. This has resulted in a skewed male/female ratio
    as well as genetic depletion of large individuals.
    A common method of hunting is to use one or two dogs. They do not drive the moose but, rather like sheep dogs, try to get the moose to stand still so the dog handler can sneak up close enough to take a shot. If the dogs are not able to get the moose to stand or the dog handler spooks the animal it will move away from the disturbance. This is when most are shot by the previously mentioned posted hunters. Also, in the south were land plots are too small for using dogs, driven hunts are common. By law you are required to have a trained search dog available so almost no wounded animals are lost and all meat is consumed.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  15. alaskanpiper

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    an iconic national symbol it is also a traffic hazard

    Can definitely relate to this. In Alaska hundreds and hundreds of moose are killed on the roads each year, as well as many people who collide with them (they tend to roll up and come right through the windshield). You can actually get on a list here to receive road killed moose meat.

    Sounds like quite the moose history in Sweden. We require a little bit of game management here, but most of it comes in the form of predator control (killing enough bear and wolf to keep moose populations healthy).

    It is not legal to kill cow moose here, except for the occasional "draw" hunt for which you must win a lottery. With regular tags (free for anyone) only bulls are harvested, and in most units they must have either 3 brow tines on at least one side OR a 50 inch spread OR be a small "spike/fork" with two or less tines on at least one side.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  16. taildraggin

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    A buddy has an old hunting cabin on a lake in Maine. They’re so far in the grey woods and swamps that there are very few deer, but many moose and bear. (The deer are in town, feeding on hydrangea.) Since, it’s hard to draw a moose or bear tag we go out on what are more ‘armed hiking’ excursions than true deer hunting.

    In around 50 years and not for trying, he has shot 1 deer there. That situation was much like our friend here, sitting and smoking. He sat down at a fireroad crossroad and pulled a cig. Puffing away, his Monarch of the North popped out and was dropped. That was 20 years ago. So much for tales rivaling Percival, Selby or Ruark. I go up there for the ruffs and to smoke, drink scotch, Laugh & Scratch, and fire up the old iron cooker.

    Of course, it is possible to be chased by a moose (that you can’t shoot) because your buddy has soaked himself in “Doe in Raging Estrous”.
    Friend likes custom rifles and Cabala gadgets and had the scent on and a brand new expensive designer make that weighs less than it should and has the power of a german 88. Walking back to the cabin on the 2 track, Bullwinkle pops out behind us In Love, hearts circling his head and blind as a bat. We looked at each other, spent 1/4 sec considering “fight or flight” and the moose stomped. We ran.

    We found that swamp donkeys are a lot faster and more determined than many may believe. After a few steps, coincident but independent decisions were made to chuck our rifles in order to increase our velocity. Running downhill into the cabin, we slammed the door just before Bullwinkle backpedaled into the cabin wall outside with a big thump and long skid marks... Can’t remember a time I’ve laughed harder.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  17. alaskanpiper

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    Hahaha, yes Bull moose can be a bit aggressive during the rut. Especially small ones who have had their asses kicked a few times by larger bulls. They don't like that you are not the cow you claimed to be while calling, and will often circle you, grunt, and sometimes mock charge. It is always a sphincter tightening experience.

    Of course, if they are legal, this is not a problem. You just shoot them in the brains. If they are not......it can get......fun...

    You get to weigh the $10K in fines and hunting license revocation against, well, your life and/or limbs. Nothing like having to choose between two shit options. Fortunately, I've never had to do it, usually they will piss off eventually.

    I've found whistling at them will sometimes get them to piss off. They don't like it for some reason. If that doesn't work a good old fashioned shot over the bow will usually do it, but that spooks every moose for miles, and will require you to relocate.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  18. jaytex969

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    Yes we have a smaller subspecies than your Alaskan moose and also a warmer climate resulting in smaller body size.

    That's the reaction I had upon moving to Texas. Growing up in the mid-Atlantic area, when I saw Texas wildlife, my first thought was, "It's like a deer, only smaller."

    I've never seen a moose in the wild but met some elk hiking in New Mexico. The leg of a small one was more meat than a whole white tail. I'd have to buy two freezers and get help from all my friends to harvest a moose or elk.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  19. 5star

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    Looks like my great uncle’s Mauser, the one he used to get a terrific elk one year.

    "You are remembered for the rules you break." - General Douglas MacArthur
    Posted 1 week ago #
  20. husky

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    Good story taildraggin!
    Reminds me of the legendary aboriginal Nigel.
    Nigel bear hunting

    Posted 1 week ago #
  21. alaskanpiper

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    I've never seen a moose in the wild but met some elk hiking in New Mexico. The leg of a small one was more meat than a whole white tail. I'd have to buy two freezers and get help from all my friends to harvest a moose or elk.

    A bull moose usually results in between 400 and 600lbs of meat after field dressing. The largest one I have taken so far ended up being 643 lbs of meat after processing. The Golden Rule is never shoot one more than a mile from your airplane/ATV/Boat/Vehicle. And NEVER EVER EVER EVER shoot one standing in any body of water whatsoever.

    Ironically, in Alaska we have some of the smallest North American deer as well in Sitka Blacktails. To put it in perspective, last trip to Kodiak we harvested 15 of them and it was just over 500lbs of meat. About the same as 1 average moose, hahaha. Those little buggers are super tasty though.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  22. madox07

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    Moose .. boy some of you guys are lucky to be living in such nice natural environments. In Romania a carpathian stag is the most one could wish for, and a licence to shoot one can cost an arm and a leg. They do come with wonderful trophies, not to mention that the meat tastes awesome. Smoking a pipe while stalking one bull stag, well big no no, they won't come near you especially if the wind blows from behind you. Boar on the other hand, we organize large chases, as in 100 hunters/ stand, so before the chasers get near you one can smoke a pipe without any worry. I have done it dozens of times and shot me a nice pig as well.

    The Mauser is the father of a great deal of hunting rifles here in Europe. The mauser system is used by manufacturers such as CZ, Zastava, etc. Quite a mechanism I might add, very reliable, very sturdy. I am surprised as to how many hunters on the group ... happy hunting to all you guys.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  23. alaskanpiper

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    a carpathian stag is the most one could wish for, and a licence to shoot one can cost an arm and a leg. They do come with wonderful trophies, not to mention that the meat tastes awesome.

    I got lucky enough to shoot a Tahr, Goat, and a Red Stag in New Zealand a number of years ago. Not sure if that's the same as a carpathian stag, but If I remember right they are at least somewhat similar? It was an excellent hunt and the meat was absolutely delicious. Here he is on the wall in the living room...

    Posted 1 week ago #
  24. alaskanpiper

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    And here's a few of these guys just for kicks

    Posted 1 week ago #
  25. madox07

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    Nice, very nice, man those elk antlers are grand. Below are a few pictures of the Carpathian stag (cervus elaphus) - does look similar to your naturalized trophy. First pic is taken in Iasi county, and the second is our deceased former dictator displaying his gold medal trophy at some hunting convention. These little puppies grow to be up to 300 kg for a male in its prime, an outstanding site. The route season is also interesting, sleeping at night in the woods and listening to their calls is at least a once in a life time experience.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  26. alaskanpiper

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    Both look like awesome trophies. There are definitely some real freaks out there when it comes to stags. One thing that is interesting about moose is they all remain very typical antler-wise. The occasional drop tine or “wavy palm” is about all we get for irregularity. Ive seen pics of an odd one or two, but nothing like you see in stags or other deer species. A full grown moose can weigh 1200lbs (550kg or so). The fun is over when they hit the ground, hahaha.

    Being in the woods with family and friends is really what its all about! Especially after a good steak, some scotch, a good pipe, and if youre lucky the northern lights will come out and dance for you. Doesn’t get much better than that!

    Posted 1 week ago #
  27. paulie66scandinavian

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    @JayTex,yes Sir, That one you have mentioned is kinda iconic Rifle hereby

    Posted 1 week ago #
  28. madox07

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    Paul no hunting stories, sir? I do believe you folks have some marvelous wild life in you country ...

    Posted 1 week ago #
  29. paulie66scandinavian

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    @Madox07, Yes Sir,You're right with Your assumptions,but unfortunately can give here no stories, before days I was an avid gunman and went to the shooting range almost every and each day, then some years ago the range was closed down and as a result I traded off 95% of my guns,as of Today only two pieces are remaining,a Walter Ppk 7,65mm/32Auto and then a Winchester rifle + gun laws became very strict lately and it'll take both, nerves and money if one wants to acquire a license for personal'firearms.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  30. madox07

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    Paul I feel that ... I need to renew my gun licence this month, a true hassle. Psychiatry report, ear doctor approval, eye doctor approval, heart doctor approval, neurologist approval, family doctor opinion on chronic diseases, yearly shootings in a certified range, proof of 5 hunting outings / year, a bunch o other paperwork, take the guns to the police inspectorate so they can verify series ... god I miss the times I was living in Texas, where you could buy shotgun shells and rifles from Walmart.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  31. husky

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    I thought we had among the hardest rules!
    But we are working hard to catch up.
    Mental health and no convictions required.
    If I am a certified hunter (short course, basic knowledge of wildlife and legislation,
    safe gun handling and basic shooting skills) I can get up to 6 licenses for long guns
    with specific purpose of hunting. For sport shooting I need to be an active member of a
    shooting club. No real limit to number, just purpose. I have a bench rest rifle on a hunting license
    just because there is no club near by.
    Handguns are a different story.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  32. paulie66scandinavian

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    @Madox07, sound like something similar we've gotten here lately except for that gun licenses are issued for a lifetime+it seems that easiest way to get licensed today is to apply for a gun collector license,nontheless all this involves background checks, bunch of money and written letters where one has to describe and show his knowledge in firearms and create collector's scheme where he states what sort of (military)firearms he/she is planning to acquire, apply fee is around $200(approved or not) and installation of armored)weapons locker is indispensable in this specific case. after the WW2 Finland has the highest number of firearms per citizen after the U.S, I have been always saying The State of TX is a good place to live if one happens to like guns-hunting and sport shooting)

    Posted 1 week ago #
  33. jaytex969

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    Texas is a great place for owning and shooting guns, but it's great for hunting only if you are wealthy or the owner of acreage.

    There is very little public land for hunting, relative to the size of the state. More often than not, one must shell out lots of hard earned tobacco moneys to lease a spot on private property.

    In fact, many Texans travel out of state and pay the higher out of state fees just to have more land to hunt in Colorado, New Mexico and other surrounding states.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  34. paulie66scandinavian

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    @JayTex, Thanks for this piece of information, this was news to me

    Posted 1 week ago #
  35. taildraggin

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    Madox

    The Mauser is the father of a great deal of hunting rifles here in Europe.
    . Many 20th century US military and sporting arms too...

    I got as far north as the country above Brasov. Very rich and beautiful - deep, dark woods.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  36. madox07

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    jaytex969 yeah, I remember going up for shooting red tail in Oklahoma. There was turkey close to the border with Louisiana though. Wild hog was never an issue, open season all year long, and since they are considered vermin in Texas you can shoot them for pretty cheap.

    taildraggin Brasaov is a very lovely city. It has less to do with Romanian culture though, since for most part of its history it was a German town. The nature around Brasov, Poiana Brasov, Rasnov and Bran is outstandig, the game too, but hunting big game around there is very expensive. North of Brasov you have the lower east Transylvanian plateau, what we call the former hungarian counties - Covasna and Harghita, north west you have Sighisoara (very beautifully preserved medieval town) and Targu Mures, also part of former Transylvania. How come you got to visit?

    Paul owning a gun is more difficult with each passing year in Romania. For a while now we get to have a checkup every 5 years. If you fail that you loose your guns. The requirements for the checkup though have been steepened since I have become a hunter ...

    Posted 6 days ago #
  37. taildraggin

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    Yes, it was unexpected to roll into a Teutonic city in the middle of the country. My mother’s family were poles in what is now the Ukraine and they had similar ancient German cities scattered about. I have an old Mannlicher Schonauer that would work in those woods very well.

    Posted 5 days ago #
  38. alaskanpiper

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    We are lucky in Alaska. Plenty of good public land hunting for many species of big game. After turning 18, one can walk into a store and walk out with a gun and ammunition, unless you are a felon.

    There are a few hunting units (popular ones where encountering another hunter is probable) that require you to take a hunter education course through the department of fish and game in order to hunt certain species in that unit though if you were born after........I think its 1986?

    Posted 5 days ago #
  39. lochinvar

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    I love Mauser, the 98 may be the greatest mass produced item ever.

    You guys are way ahead of me on the moose. All we have here in the Smokies are a smattering of whitetails.....of course we also have the great Black Bear in abundance, so that's a pretty good trade.

    Posted 5 days ago #
  40. alaskanpiper

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    the great Black Bear

    I friggin hate black bears. They are the ultimate Cabin/Camp pest. I have probably spent thousands patching atv tires, holes in gas tanks, duct taping down seat foam, new rubber for handlebars, occasionally a cabin wall or two, hundreds of fish, boat seats, airplane rudder cables, waders, gas cans, trailer tires, etc. from those stupid little bastards.

    It's really my fault for leaving my crap all over God's creation, but still. None of these things are food, guys. Well, except the fish.

    Not only that, but when you unfortunately have to kill one to protect your life or property, they taste like DIRT! Horrible greasy, gamey, fatty, disgusting little deadly rat-pig vandals. Especially after they get into the fish. Ugh. They are cool critters like everything else but damn they annoy me.

    Posted 5 days ago #
  41. lochinvar

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    They entertain me even if they do cost me quite a bit. And they make for a good October day out with my .35:)

    Posted 5 days ago #
  42. madox07

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    Not only that, but when you unfortunately have to kill one to protect your life or property, they taste like DIRT!

    That's odd, brown bear tastes delicious - very rich in protein, lean, and tasty (sure it tastes like game, but ... nothing a marinade or grinding for sausage cannot solve). Brown bear paws are a special delicatessen around here, a paw dish costs roughly EUR 300. Black bear, well we don't have those around here so ... I can't really say.

    I love Mauser, the 98 may be the greatest mass produced item ever.

    This shouldn't come as a surprise but the AK 47 is the most produced rifle ever, way out passing the Mauser figures.

    I have an old Mannlicher Schonauer that would work in those woods very well.

    Now the Steyer Mannlicher is another thing, state of the art weapons.

    Posted 4 days ago #
  43. husky

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    I love Mauser, the 98 may be the greatest mass produced item ever.

    The large ring mauser, controlled feed action is one of the most iconic and sought after
    gun actions, especially for dangerous game (right or wrong).
    I'll let you in on a secret. The most underrated, cheapest and least bought and used guns
    lurking at the back of most Swedish gun shops (and exported as surplus to the US)
    are Husqvarna rifles with original, FN-made Mauser 98-actions! Mostly in the original 8mm Mauser kaliber
    or a Swedish necked up version to 9,3mm. It has been called the poor man's Rigby
    and in both function and build quality there is not much difference between these and their
    Holland and Holland or Rigby counterparts.
    This is a picture of mine and the U-shaped cut out on the left side is the thumb groove
    for reloading with clips that came on FN's military actions.


    The forum won't let me choose orientation...

    Posted 4 days ago #
  44. alaskanpiper

    alaskanpiper

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    That's odd, brown bear tastes delicious - very rich in protein, lean, and tasty

    Not here! They are even worse than black bears. It is tolerable when made into sausage, but only spring bears. Once the fish come in and they get into them they start to taste horrible.

    Some people eat them, but with all the moose, caribou, blacktail deer, elk, dall sheep, salmon, halibut, ling cod, etc. to be had in the state of Alaska, it is hard to find time for bear.

    Posted 4 days ago #
  45. husky

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    There is an ecological difference between bear populations that may be the reason for your disagreement.
    In Canada and Alaska the bears get their winter fat from fish.
    Norwegian bears get a lot from domestic sheep that free range in the mountains, of which they mainly consume the fat.
    In Sweden, we ruined our salmon rivers by clearing them for timber rafting and we don't have free ranging sheep
    so the main source of energy comes from eating bilberry.
    What do the bears eat during summer/autumn in romania?

    Posted 4 days ago #
  46. alaskanpiper

    alaskanpiper

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    There is an ecological difference between bear populations that may be the reason for your disagreement.

    This certainly has a lot to do with it. The same species of animal can taste wildly different based on habitat and diet. Taste a Copper River King (Chinook) Salmon side by side with a King from the Great Lakes and that will tell you everything you need to know, hahaha. Although if you like Kings from the great lakes, don't do this, because you will never be able to eat them again.

    I imagine bears or anything else would fluctuate similarly with dietary and lifestyle changes.

    Posted 4 days ago #
  47. madox07

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    What do the bears eat during summer/autumn in romania?

    They hardly eat fish, especially now days since the trout population from mountain rivers has been decimated. During the summer they are mostly herbivorous - berries, green walnuts, stuff like that. They eat a carcass every so often, although it is less frequent for the bears to attack sheep pens during the summer time. Also they may have ants, bees - beekeepers in the mountain regions, especially after exhausting the little sunflower they have in their regions, may go up in altitude and the bear may attack the bee racks for the honey. During the winter time we have most of the trouble with them, since their population has exponentially grown over the past years. If there is a harsh winder they usually hibernate, but if the winter is mild they come out of their lairs and are desperate for food - some attack sheep enclosures, others attack peasants' life stock, and many unfortunately roam through trash dumpsters in mountainous resorts to the tourists' horror. So yea, alaskanpiper I get your point, different diet here.

    he most underrated, cheapest and least bought and used guns
    lurking at the back of most Swedish gun shops (and exported as surplus to the US)
    are Husqvarna rifles with original

    I thought Husqvarna makes professional power tools, I had no idea they made guns ...

    Posted 4 days ago #
  48. husky

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    Husqvarna gun factory
    My great grandfather worked there lathe turning pistol barrels.

    Posted 4 days ago #
  49. jaytex969

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    My most prized Mauser was manufactured by FN in Belgium for the Colombian military in the 50's as a 30.06 caliber.

    At some point, it made it to the fledgeling Israeli military and was re-chambered to 7.62 Nato (".308" * ) and was refurbed with Israeli and Nazi German parts from the parts bin.

    Some time thereafter, it made it to England, as it has British proof marks on the barrel. It eventually landed in a pawn shop in Hutto, Texas, where I snagged it.

    I only wish to some day be as well traveled as my rifle.

    * Note to the ballistics minded: I am quite aware of the dimensional and pressure differences between the two, as you see I used "quotations", only added for familiarity's sake. No need to glaze over the eyes of the disinterested with that peripheral debate here.

    Posted 4 days ago #
  50. lochinvar

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    Husky, the Magnum Mauser is one of my great loves. Mentioning names like .416 Rigby, .505 Gibbs, John Hunter or Jim Sutherland are a sure way to my heart (even better, Westey Richards drop lock double rifle in .500NE).

    I have not run across an FN/Swedeish 98, but that is a great looking rifle. . I do have one of the Swedish 96 Mausers (made by Carl Gustaf in 1918) and love it. Its a long beast but fun to shoot and the 6.5 Swede is a favorite.

    Posted 4 days ago #
  51. madox07

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    Speaking of Mauser, I remembered a story from 2010. I was just back from Texas, and obviously I couldn't bring my hunting guns with me, so I was looking for a rifle for medium to large game. Somewhere in the boonies a friend of mine, a cop in a small town called Lipova, took me in the hills in a small village where an ex forest warden wanted to sell his gun. I was stunned when I picked up the piece and to my absolut surprise I could clearly read "Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken in Berlin". I was literally holding Mauser's grandfather in my hands, this particular model being made in 1901, with Krupp steel imperial inscriptions and the whole 9 yards. I am not sure about that particular piece, but the model did see most of its action in Brazil in some rebellion and in the second Boer War. I took the piece out in the hills and I fired it, it was chambered in 7x64 ... dead accurate, the scope mounted being a 1950 Henzolt (old Zeiss factory). I ended up not buying it, it was a 100+ year old weapon ... I wonder to this day if I did not make a mistake. It could have been restored, making up for an amazing antique.

    Further down there is me in my mid 20s, I believe it was in 2009, with a 1939 make Mauser 98. My cop friend, who has now passed away, had bought it from Austria. They apparantly found a batch of these babies in 1954 in a warehouse in Austria. They never saw action during the war, and ended up being sold for hunting purposes. It was mint condition, you could even see the Nazi eagle with the swastika engraved in blued Krupp steel. The piece ended up with my friend's brother in law. I told him that if he ever should consider parting with I would pay premium for it - in remembrance of my friend.

    Posted 3 days ago #
  52. madox07

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    And one more for the Mauser lovers, just yesterday I ran across a hunting partner of ours - he restores guns, and he is finally parting with his 1980 Mauser. Below are some pics (in Romania engraved weapons are very sought after). Asking price EUR 2000, and it comes with 2 Bushnell scopes, 1.5-6x40, and 8-12x58 ... not a bad asking price, just the fast mounts for the scope being somhere north of EUR 500, although my wife will kill me if I buy a rifle, given that I use my browning maybe 5 times a year.

    Posted 3 days ago #
  53. newbroom

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    Ron White, deer hunter from Texas.
    deer hunter

    Posted 3 days ago #
  54. madox07

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    Ain't that the tater salad guy ?

    Posted 3 days ago #
  55. husky

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    Engraved guns are not my cup of tea but I do appreciate workmanship in any form.
    If I am to critique the gun that is a beautiful, rather deep cut, relief on an old FN military action.
    However the barrel looks original but unfortunately with new sights and strap mount.
    The stock and scope mounts are also new and nowhere near matching the quality of the action.

    lochinvar, the old -96 is also a great gun and the build quality on the Carl gustaf and FFV are equal to
    the Husqvarna -98. Husqvarna -96 are not (but almost) as good as it was a rush job during WWII to get more rifles out to the
    drafted men and later the equivalent of the NRA. I have one of the latter as my long range target gun.
    You just have to be aware that the -96 action was built around a black powder load and are not made for
    the pressures that can be achieved with modern smokeless powders.

    Posted 3 days ago #
  56. lochinvar

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    Husky, yes the 96 is not what the 98 is, as much as I love their super slick action, I wouldn't make it the basis of a project if rechambering was involved. That's why we have the 98 and it's children to play with. Today with original examples ticking up in price, the CZ's current modified 98 action is solid choice for me. Decent out of the box and with a little work, they are a smooth customer. The other modified 98 action that I love to use is the 1917 Enfield .30'06. It's tough as a tank and you can use it for cartridges up to the .505 Gibbs....I think even to the .577 T-Rex. Unmodified they are great, the only oddity being their cock-on-closing action.

    Posted 3 days ago #
  57. User has not uploaded an avatar

    wulfheard

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    I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the pre 1964 Winchester model 70...another modified mauser action...It's arguably one of the finest sporting bolt actions ever commerically produced. Also while we are at it, I'll put the 03 Springfield up against a mauser 98 any day of the week. Also the old Krag is another nice action...Don't let the fact that the 30-40 is a bit anemic or the fact that the side loading box mag is ugly as hell fool you. The action on a Krag is glass smooth and reliable as any. You just have to keep in mind that older Krags need mild loads but the later production Norwegian Krags can actually be rechambered and rebarreled to 30-06.

    Posted 1 day ago #
  58. husky

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    @lochinvar

    today with original examples ticking up in price, the CZ's current modified 98 action is solid choice for me.
    I had Africa dreams myself once and played a bit with heavier calibres, mostly 458WM. I actually have what may very well have been the last, new, unfired Brno 602 in 375H&H. As a project I am remaking the stock in a more classic safari fashion.
    Do you have any boomers?

    Posted 21 hours ago #

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