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1966 Dunhill LBS

(50 posts)
  • Started 1 year ago by cigrmaster
  • Latest reply from usrkain47
  1. cigrmaster

    cigrmaster

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    I decided that I needed to smoke a Dunhill from the era that is supposed to be one of the best. With help from Jesse I decided to go after this one. It is supposed to be in excellent condition and the nomenclature is also crisp. It happened to be from a guy who knows George so I was confident in purchasing the pipe after speaking with him.

    After I purchased it, I showed it to Al and he told me that it is a fairly rare edition because of the saddle stem. I love the classic looks of this pipe and am excited to see how it smokes.



    Harris
    Posted 1 year ago #
  2. thomasw

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    Harris, I like the bowl thickness on that pipe! Some Dunhills don't have very thick bowls but yours is suited for sipping flakes! What's the length? TW

    After some time he felt for his pipe. It was not broken, and that was something. Then he felt for his pouch, and there was some tobacco in it, and that was something more. Then he felt for matches and he could not find any at all, and that shattered his hopes completely.

    The Hobbit
    Posted 1 year ago #
  3. cigrmaster

    cigrmaster

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    Thom, I totally agree about the wall thickness. It is why I bought this particular pipe. I also see tons of Dunhills with very thin walls, that I know are going to be hot smokers. Here are the pipe stats.
    * Length: 5 5/8”

    * Height: 2”

    * Chamber Diameter: 7/8”

    * Chamber Depth: 1 3/4"

    * Weight: 1.7 oz/48 g

    Posted 1 year ago #
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    derekflint

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    Congrats, bet it's going to be a great smoker....

    Posted 1 year ago #
  5. cigrmaster

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    derek, thanks. I am hoping it will be. If it is a great smoker, look out Dunhill collectors, you will have a little more competition.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  6. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

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    look out Dunhill collectors, you will have a little more competition

    Heh, heh! That will take some pressure off the Barling market. My evil plan has worked!

    It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt. - Mark Twain

    It is pointless to argue with a fanatic since a dim bulb can't be converted into a searchlight. - Jesse Silver
    Posted 1 year ago #
  7. cigrmaster

    cigrmaster

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    Jesse, you should know better than that. I am a good multitask er and can buy both Dunhill and Pre Trans Barlings with either hand. Your Barlings are not safe.

    Posted 1 year ago #
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    Anonymous

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    I'm not trying to be a smart ass, but you do realize it is a 6LB, and not an LBS?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  9. ssjones

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    I did tell Harris I'm no LB/S expert!

    Good point Hagley. It appears that the 6 designated the Saddle stem, which makes sense.

    Al

    Posted 1 year ago #
  10. doctorbob

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    I think you are better off with an LB over and LBS anyway. The LBS shape always strikes me as slightly clunky and unbalanced.

    I dig the blast on your new acquisition!

    Doc

    Posted 1 year ago #
  11. cigrmaster

    cigrmaster

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    hagley, no I did not know it is an LB and not an LBS. I didn't know there is a difference. I just liked the shape so I bought it.

    doctor, thanks.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  12. echambers

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    1966! That's my birth year and hence, that pipe (or one from the same year) is my unicorn!

    "There's something that doesn't make sense. Let's go poke it with a stick."
    Posted 1 year ago #
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    Anonymous

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    doctor bob, me thinks you do not know the difference between an LB and LBS. The LB is the chunky billiard, and the LBS is a slimmer shank/bowl version of the LB.

    Posted 1 year ago #
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    Anonymous

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    cigarmaster, that is all that is important.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  15. chasingembers

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    I've had three strikes from Dunhill. A straight Ruby Bark Billiard from '94 that wouldn't pass a pipe cleaner. A Shell Briar LB '74 that is now a bonsai container, and a Shell Briar '74 Zulu that's a glove box pipe. Wish you well with that one, but Dunhill has become less than a basket pipe from my experiences.

    Damnation seize my soul if I give you quarters, or take any from you.
    -Edward Teach
    Posted 1 year ago #
  16. doctorbob

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    doctor bob, me thinks you do not know the difference between an LB and LBS. The LB is the chunky billiard, and the LBS is a slimmer shank/bowl version of the LB.

    I do know the difference :), to me the LB carries the chunky shape to an aesthetic conclusion, although Dunhill's tendency to apply a straight taper stem on occasion does somewhat ruin the effect. The LBS, in my opinion, looks like the shaper was going for a LB but lost his nerve.

    Doc

    Posted 1 year ago #
  17. doctorbob

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    I've had three strikes from Dunhill. A straight Ruby Bark Billiard from '94 that wouldn't pass a pipe cleaner. A Shell Briar LB '74 that is now a bonsai container, and a Shell Briar '74 Zulu that's a glove box pipe. Wish you well with that one, but Dunhill has become less than a basket pipe from my experiences.

    The above doesn't have much to do with Harris's new pipe, but to balance- I have a 1920, two '23's, a '33, a '44 and a '50 that are all outstanding pipes. The '50 LB shell and the '23 Bruyere 151, in particular, measure well against any pipe I have ever experienced, by any maker, from any era. Of course, these are earlier pipes, and times do change.

    Doc

    Posted 1 year ago #
  18. cigrmaster

    cigrmaster

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    Chasing, way to dump a cold bucket of water on my Dunhill. lol

    I owned 2 2000 Bruyeres and one 70's shelll. I got rid of them all. I am hopeful that this era of alleged Dunhill brilliance will transfer to my 1966. If it doesn't I am going to chase Chasing down and make him smoke bowl after bowl of Mixture 79, so there.

    Doc, thanks for sticking up for my 66, he appreciates it.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  19. sablebrush52

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    The above doesn't have much to do with Harris's new pipe, but to balance- I have a 1920, two '23's, a '33, a '44 and a '50 that are all outstanding pipes. The '50 LB shell and the '23 Bruyere 151, in particular, measure well against any pipe I have ever experienced, by any maker, from any era. Of course, these are earlier pipes, and times do change.

    A lot of Dunhill collectors consider the period from 1958 thru 1968 to be a high water mark.

    This is because Dunhill outsourced all of their remaining in-house manufacturing to Barling.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  20. cigrmaster

    cigrmaster

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    Jesse, Where did the wood come from back in that period? Is it the oil curing that made them so sought after?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  21. doctorbob

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    A lot of Dunhill collectors consider the period from 1958 thru 1968 to be a high water mark.

    This is because Dunhill outsourced all of their remaining in-house manufacturing to Barling.

    I have a '64 that I have not smoked yet, it is a funky 'scandinavian bulldog' that has a very narrow, tall chamber. I am not terribly impressed with the bit, either. I'll give it a go tonight though, and see how she deals with ERR. Most of my collecting has trended towards earlier, classic Britwood marques limiting my exposure to the later efforts of those companies.

    Doc

    Posted 1 year ago #
  22. thomasw

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    So Harris ... have you put that LB through its paces yet? Cool, dry smokes or steamy, moist and hot smokes; what is the story? Another thing that I like about your pipe is the stem; first in that it is straight (I find unbent stems easier to clean and pass through the pipe-cleaners) and second in that it is saddle shaped, which I find slightly more comfortable to clench than a straight tapered stem. Let us know the deal... Or perhaps you don't have it in hand yet?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  23. sablebrush52

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    Jesse, Where did the wood come from back in that period? Is it the oil curing that made them so sought after?

    My memory is turning to shit so all I can recall at the moment is that Dunhill came into some great briar that they used in that period, and they were still doing a lot of hand crafting. The briar used they would have bought on the market, like everyone else at that time. The countries they sourced from also changed as the Algerian briar that they ahd used for blasts, became unavailable. I can't remember where I put the info on sourcing, so I can't be more helpful. Sardinia, Calabria? Damn. They were sought after because they were good pipes that were very heavily promoted.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  24. cigrmaster

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    Thomas, don't have the pipe yet, tracking says Friday?

    Jesse, what do you mean you don't know? That is no answer, I expect you to know what country the briar is from and who picked it out of the ground. Now get back at it and find me the answers.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  25. chasingembers

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    If it doesn't I am going to chase Chasing down and make him smoke bowl after bowl of Mixture 79, so there.

    You do realize that I go through a couple of pounds of Mixture 79 per year, right?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  26. cigrmaster

    cigrmaster

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    chasing, I did not know that. I just got a pouch of 79 in as I have never tried it. One of my grandfathers smoked it so I decided I needed to try it. Will it ghost a pipe at all?

    Posted 1 year ago #
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    doctorbob, I think LBS resulted from a larger billiard that was intended to be a shape 59. The shape 127 is a small LB. The 127 is probably my favorite Dunhill shape.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  28. chasingembers

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    Will it ghost a pipe at all?

    Oh yes, it will certainly ghost. Seems like an American take on Lakelands. It is definitely a polarizing blend, but a few on here have found they like it. I buy it in bulk now.

    http://pipesmagazine.com/forums/topic/ah-crap-i-like-mixture-79

    Posted 1 year ago #
  29. doctorbob

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    Hagley, that is a very interesting observation. I love this forum.

    Doc

    Posted 1 year ago #
  30. chasingembers

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    The '50 LB shell and the '23 Bruyere 151, in particular, measure well against any pipe I have ever experienced, by any maker, from any era. Of course, these are earlier pipes, and times do change.

    What happened after the '60s? I've not experienced a good Dunhill pipe.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  31. cigrmaster

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    chasing, thanks for the warning on the 79, now what pipe do I pick to take the hit?

    After 1969 from what I was told, Dunhill stopped oil curing their briar and the pipes weren't the same.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  32. chasingembers

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    chasing, thanks for the warning on the 79, now what pipe do I pick to take the hit?

    I would say try a cob to see if you like it first.

    After 1969 from what I was told, Dunhill stopped oil curing their briar and the pipes weren't the same.

    Now that makes a lot of sense. All of mine have been post '70, and not much to talk about.

    Posted 1 year ago #
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    I have 5 or 6 LBS, and really like them. All of mine are the longer shank versions, which really come close to being a Liverpool. All LBS are the same length, so the ones with longer shanks have shorter stems. The same is true with LB-they are all the same length, and differences in shank length are offset by the length of the stem.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  34. cigrmaster

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    hagley, are any of yours from 69 and earlier and how do they smoke? I like the LB because of the thickness of the walls, do yours smoke nice and cool?

    Posted 1 year ago #
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    Cigarmaster, let's be careful when talking about LB and LBS. If it were not so difficult to post photos to this forum, I would post an LB and an LBS. The LBS is a slimmed down version of an LB with a smaller bowl and a smaller shank. The majority of my Dunhills are pre 1965, and they are all delightful smokes. Some of the LB are like Snicker Bars, which is the way an old friend of mine described great smoking pipes. This collector was a friend of Dan Merriman, who knows exactly what I mean.

    To answer your question, my LB are a joy to smoke. I might add that I have a few ODA from the 1970s, and they are great too.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  36. cigrmaster

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    hagley, thanks for the info. My pipe is scheduled to be here tomorrow so hopefully I will be reporting on how it smokes then. I have picked 2007 Stonehaven for it's maiden voyage. I am quit familiar with that blend so we shall see how the Dunhill performs. Is there a difference in pipes made after 1965? Is my 1966 or a 1967 going to be that different from a 65 and older? I read that the oil curing stopped after 1969.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  37. chasingembers

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    My '74 LB just after cleaning it up. Just couldn't get a good smoke out of it.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  38. cigrmaster

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    My pipe arrived and I am done with a bowl of 2007 Stonehaven. The pipe performed really well. It burned cool and bone dry and the tobacco tasted very nice. The pipe is in pristine condition as advertised. The stem is a tad thicker than my artisan made pipes but not so much that is uncomfortable. I am very happy I bought this and am looking forward to getting my next LB, I really love this shape.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  39. leatherman

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    That's a really sharp pipe, and I'm glad to hear it meets your expectations. I'm fascinated by the finish. In the photos, it looks black, but in the last photo, it looks more reddish by the nomenclature. Is that just the lighting?

    Posted 1 year ago #
  40. cigrmaster

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    leatherman, thanks. Yes it is more reddish at the nomenclature and it is kind of cool looking.

    Posted 1 year ago #
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    oldgeezersmoker

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    @hagley, I am sure there are differences of opinion and not to knock the really old pre WW
    II examples, but for me the immediate postwar patent number LB's were among the best pipes I ever smoked. Maybe for most of the rest of the 1950's, but I only had a few of those. 60's examples were just not that magic. They did indeed smoke sweeter than a Snickers Bar - and drier than a popcorn fart. I never considered myself that much of a Dunhill guy, but I loved those 40's and 50's LB's.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  42. saltedplug

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    When I began the pipe I was overwhelmed with the hundreds of blends and pipes, and as I read the forums I was very happy to learn that this member loved Petersons and that member Ashtons, claiming to have had superlative experiences smoking them. But I was always curious to know in what way their favorite pipe delivered those superb smokes, and I still am, but find that such claims cannot be substantiated by them or by me, having smoked my share of better pipes.

    To be blunt, I find no difference from one pipe to another. Since we are inevitably mind and body, no event can be claimed to be experienced by one or the other. In the same way the pipe experience begins from the moment I decide to smoke through the time when I choose the pipe and tobacco, through loading, lighting and smoking it. The subjective in this enters by my palate and continues to the pipe cradling the tobacco and the place where I am smoking. The experience is inner and outer, subjective and objective. As the two are inextricably mixed, there is no way to declare whether the smoking experience can be attributed to both or either.

    Things are as we think they are and cannot be other. The observer of an experiment influences the outcome. Thinking that pipes do or do not significantly influence the pipe experience makes it so. Since my mind says they do not, they do not; but this is what my studied experience tells me.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  43. usrkain47

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    I do love the profile of a good LBS. Though as someone else noted the first pictured pipe in the original post is a 6LB due to the saddle stem you really can't go wrong with that classic chunky english billiard. Here is my own 1957 LBS and definitely one of my prizes.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  44. leatherman

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    Saltedplug, very well said! Did you study philosophy? While I agree with everything you've said, I think one factor that plays into our experiences with pipe smoking is the quality and pedigree of the pipe itself. Like a beautiful vintage car, or the latest Mercedes, a high quality briar pipe holds value that a less expensive pipe can't hold. And if it adds to the enjoyment of the smoker, all the better. We all have different taste, and that's what makes life interesting.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  45. georged

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    Here is my own 1957 LBS

    That's either a Redbark (meaning it was made after 1971/72); your camera's color balance is way off; or it's a '57 Shell that was refinished in red.

    Can you post a pic of the stamping? The Baker Street Irregulars will be in agony until you do.

    Dogs live such short lives... and spend most it waiting for us to come home
    Posted 1 year ago #
  46. huntertrw

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    The Baker Street Irregulars will be in agony until you do.




    Love Me, Love My Pipe
    Posted 1 year ago #
  47. usrkain47

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    I’ll be happy to. Let me get up and moving. =]

    Posted 1 year ago #
  48. usrkain47

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    The pictures with the much better lighting are from the gentleman I purchased her from. The first picture is as I'm making my morning cup of coffee next to the stove. Haha. I have some rather appalling lighting in the house here. She is not as red in person so there is definitely some saturation in the photos. Unfortunately as I stated previously my own in house lighting leaves much to be desired. Haha.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  49. georged

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    Looks to be a convergence of a reddish-tinged Tanshell (I have seen a few---must be something about the wood), and the color balance being off somewhere in the digital signal chain. Together they make your pipe look exactly like an early production Redbark.

    Not that it matters, of course, Dunhillers (and Barlingers and Comoy'sers) love production-related mysteries, is all. Thanks for playing.

    It's a damn nice pipe in any event. Quite a catch.

    For those interested, here's Dunhill's typical/normal Tanshell shade for comparison:

    .

    Posted 1 year ago #
  50. usrkain47

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    Thanks! And it is definitely a bit outside of that typical Tanshell. I’m incredibly lucky to have caught that pipe. The gentleman I do a great deal of pipe business with let me talk him out of it. Oh and it smokes every ounce as good as it looks.

    Posted 1 year ago #

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