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1901 Kinnear Restoration

(23 posts)
  1. zack24

    zack24

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    Picked up a 1901 Silver Mounted Kinnear stummel a couple of weeks ago missing a stem. When this came in, I figured it would be a good chance to stretch my comfort zone on repairs a bit. The original plan called for converting the screw thread to a push tenon, but I got lucky- not only were the threads in good shape, but it was a 1/4 20 thread...so I bought a 1/4 tap and die, ordered some tortoise amber rod from Steve Norse and some 1/4" white delrin for the tenon. I'm pretty happy with it- the faceted stems are a big challenge and I learned a lot about working down the edges of the stem to a fairly irregular silver mounted diamond shank- here are a few pics...






    Posted 1 year ago #
  2. mikethompson

    mikethompson

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    Very nice!

    I love seeing people who know what they're doing do what they know.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  3. danielplainview

    dave g

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    Well done sir. That’s a beaut. Nice choice going with tortoise. Looks great.

    Make aromatics great again.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  4. beefeater33

    beefeater33

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    Nice Job Zach......... I love these kind of threads......... Great choice on the stem too, fits that old classic to a "T"!!........

    "We are the music makers, and we are the dreamers of the dream..."
    Willy Wonka
    Posted 1 year ago #
  5. ssjones

    ssjones

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    Very nice! That amber stem color was a great choice, enjoy that one!

    Al

    Posted 1 year ago #
  6. usrkain47

    usrkain47

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    Yes fine work! Beautifully matched stem!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  7. tslex

    tslex

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    Lovely work. Perfect selection of materials.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  8. huntertrw

    huntertrw

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    zack24:

    That pipe is beautiful, and made all the more so by your tender ministrations with regard to the replacement stem. I do have a question, though: Wouldn't a pipe manufactured in 1901 have had an orific bit? Just curious. Regardless, I hope that it proves to be a good smoker.

    My guess is that the maker was the British firm of Kinnear & Whitwham, the same company that manufactured the Bingley and Bingo brands, and which was also a distributor of the Dr. Plumb brand of pipes. Perhaps jguss will see this thread, as I am certain that he could confirm this (or not) and provide additional information.

    Love Me, Love My Pipe
    Posted 1 year ago #
  9. huntertrw

    huntertrw

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    ...I figured it would be a good chance to stretch my comfort zone on repairs a bit.

    Oh, look, a pun!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  10. huntertrw

    huntertrw

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    Jguss was kind enough to point out to me that he had already addressed the probable provenance of this pipe in his post to a Forums thread started some three weeks ago by zack24 and titled "1901 Kirwan - Need Some Information." Mr. Guss stated:

    Zack,

    Great looking pipe; I'm excited to see what you do with it. And with an unusually obscure pedigree!

    For what it's worth I'm skeptical that the silverwork is by Kirwan & Co. The key photo is much too blurry (even on the original eBay listing) for me to really see the details of the hallmarks, but I believe the seller's assumption is off. If you're really interested about Kirwan I can tell you a fair bit about its founder, John William Kirwan (~1844-1919), and his business. But as far as I can find out despite a background as a jeweler/silversmith/goldsmith, Kirwan was never involved in the tobacco trade. Moreover his shops and his hallmark registries were in Birmingham and London, not Chester.

    I think a much better candidate is Charles Maxwell Kinnear (b. Edinburgh 1872, d. Liverpool 1939), who's involvement in the tobacco trade was a) documented, b) encompassing exactly the right time period (all his hallmarks were registered in 1901-1902), and c) at the right place (his hallmarks were registered in Chester). See: http://www.silvercollection.it/DICTIONARYTOBACCONISTK.html.

    The Wikipedia entry for Kinnear's father (a famous architect; see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Kinnear) states that his son Charles became a tobacco manufacturer, and this was clearly true for at least 14 years. As a young man in 1891 the census lists him as apprenticed to his maternal uncle, an "american produce merchant". What exactly that means is unclear. But by 1896 Kinnear pops up in Manchester trading as Leon Marcus & Co, a cigarette and tobacco manufacturer. He bought the business about that time from its founders, Leon Marcus Sogolowitch (1860-1919; a man who was a travelling salesman in the cigar and cigarette business both before and after his brief foray as a manufacturer), and Joseph V Lester. By 1900 Kinnear had relocated to Liverpool and was doing business under his own name as Kinnear Ltd at 49-57 Park Lane West.

    About a decade later Kinnear left the tobacco business to enter into partnership in an enterprise called Dorn, Harding & Co, effective January 1, 1911. They were rubber brokers and merchants. This evidently failed since by the end of that same year the partnership was dissolved. What happened to Kinnear over the next 28 years before dying outside Liverpool at the age of 66 in 1939 is unknown to me.

    Jon

    Posted 1 year ago #
  11. zack24

    zack24

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    Wouldn't a pipe manufactured in 1901 have had an orific bit?

    I'm sure it would...I definitely made some adaptations in the interests of smokability- the bite zone is 4.5mm- less than the original amber would have been and a little thicker than the 4mm I use on cumberland. Draft is wide open in the stem- I didn't touch the stummel...and I thought about threading a bone rod, but delrin is so much more durable....

    A fun exercise for sure....I have a couple of other oldies coming in over the next couple of days- figuring on a nice cleanup and will use one of them as a design inspiration for a pipe I've been thinking about...

    Posted 1 year ago #
  12. philobeddoe

    Philo Beddoe

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    Nice work Zack, that stem looks like it was always there. I really love it when these old soldiers are brought back into smoking rotations!

    "So it goes." - K.V.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  13. zack24

    zack24

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    Nice work Zack, that stem looks like it was always there. I really love it when these old soldiers are brought back into smoking rotations!

    Probably won't be smoking these...I'll have maybe 10 that I've restored at Chicago along with maybe 20 pipes I'll have made by then...I do have a really old meer that's arriving this weekend I may keep for myself...

    Posted 1 year ago #
  14. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    All righty! Nicely, nicely done.

    I hope to catch your table at Pheasant Run before all the flock has flown....

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  15. saltedplug

    saltedplug

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    Fantastic work and rescued a fine old pipe.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  16. piffyr

    piffyr

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    Great looking pipe, Zack! Working with facets is always a challenge because you can't make adjustments to one face without affecting the others, which comes back around 360 degrees to affect the face that you originally modified. I've noticed that most factory pipes with faceted features almost always have one face where all the errors from the others are collected. On stummels, it's usually the back of the bowl.

    RESPECT THE PIPE!
    Posted 1 year ago #
  17. theloniousmonkfish

    theloniousmonkfish

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    Dig the stem choice and fine work, that's a good looking pipe.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  18. uperepik

    uperepik

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    What kind of tape is the you use to protect the shank

    -
    "A pipe gives a wise man time to think and a fool something to stick in his mouth."
    C.S Lewis
    Posted 1 year ago #
  19. zack24

    zack24

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    What kind of tape is the you use to protect the shank

    It’s a vinyl tape- very blast resistant and doesn’t leave a residue. I use it for lots of stuff in the shop. It’s on the shelf at Ace Hardware...

    Posted 1 year ago #
  20. weezell

    weezell

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    I do have a really old meer that's arriving this weekend I may keep for myself...
    Oh really....wouldn't happen to be a Meer Cutty would it! (cue the scary music)Well would IT!!!! BUUUWAAaaaaa

    "the weez"...
    Posted 1 year ago #
  21. georged

    georged

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    Working with facets is always a challenge because you can't make adjustments to one face without affecting the others, which comes back around 360 degrees to affect the face that you originally modified.

    Indeed.

    And that's just on the "equatorial" axis (so to speak). Facets will bite you lengthwise as well.

    The line break along the top is because Zack didn't know the original stem's width at the button, so had to guess, and what looked right in his 21st century mind's eye was significantly wider than was normal/average 116 years ago.

    Or, put the other way around, if the stem was exactly the right amount of narrower at the button, the top line would be level.

    You sure jumped in the deep end of the repair pool, Mr. Z.

    Faceted shanks and stems always bring to mind that old joke where one guy asks another why he's hitting himself over the head with a hammer, and he answers "Because it feels good when I stop."

    .

    Dogs live such short lives... and spend most it waiting for us to come home
    Posted 1 year ago #
  22. georged

    georged

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    PS --

    Here's a pipe from the same historical period. Notice how the stem follows the line of the shank without any flare (aka "fishtail"). I've never seen an exception. That's just how pipes were made back then.

    The only way the faceted stem for Zack's pipe could maintain a straight top line AND have a modern fishtail is if was made into a severely pinched-waist shape, like the bottom pic.

    Aren't facets fun?

    .


    Posted 1 year ago #
  23. zack24

    zack24

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    You sure jumped in the deep end of the repair pool, Mr. Z

    I usually learn more from my failures than my successes...and I have learned sooo much in the past year...:) ...I had no idea that the damn things had a constant taper from shank to stem, but it very obvious when I see the lines- thanks George!. The good news is learning to scrape nice crisp facets with a blade will help the rest of my work, because I have this wierd sense of enjoyment from doing things that have no logical justification for the amount of time required to accomplish them.... Should help tremendously because I'll be making quite a few bulldogs this year...

    Posted 1 year ago #

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