you tube rocks

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

seanz

Preferred Member
May 8, 2011
651
0
Southland NZ
Making a Rope of Baccy

I just found this while looking at how to make rope tobacco.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Sqhu11WjC4&feature=youtu.be
Edit: I hope you don't mind that I have worked on your post.

I found this fascinating. So now we know where the term Perique come from.

I couldn't get the link to work, so I just posted it with a simpler method.

and edited the comments... Lawrence

 

ace57

Preferred Member
Jun 21, 2011
2,148
0
I liked that, never seen that done befor, thanks. :clap:

 

kcvet67

Preferred Member
Jul 6, 2010
968
0
Great video. Making Perique is a different process though:

http://pipesmagazine.com/blog/put-that-in-your-pipe/the-mystique-of-perique/

 

pstlpkr

Preferred Member
Dec 14, 2009
9,739
0
Birmingham, AL
Kc, while the Perique we all know and love comes from Louisiana, and that process is an adaptation from those native to that region.

The video is a demonstration purported to be the process used by sailors to produce the rolls we all know that sailors used to use... They say the word Perique is what they say the sailors used to call the end product, being what we might call Navy Rolls or Ropes. e.g. Escudo Navy De Luxe (granted this comes in coins cut from a roll, and probably much better tasting.)

The roll/rope/compression/process demonstrated in the video could very well be where those in Louisiana got the name... referring to the fermentation of tobacco under high pressure for an extended period of time.
Just thinking out loud... as it were.

 

kcvet67

Preferred Member
Jul 6, 2010
968
0
Lawrence, I have no doubt that the video shows a very accurate recreation of how sailors made their rolls, it fits everything that I've ever heard or read.
I've never seen an explanation of the name "Perique" that was very convincing. The most commonly cited explanation is that it's a Cajun variation of the word "prick" which always struck me as a little bogus. From the spelling of the word, it's obviously French in origin which would fit with the Acadian influence in the St. James area.
One of the singular features of the process of making Perique is that the pressure ISN'T constant. Several times a year the pressure is removed, the leaves are reversed in order and pressure is again applied. The mixture is actively fermented, while the fermentation of rolls, cobs and plugs is more passive. The process is similar to that in wine making and may be why Perique has such unique characteristics.

 

unclearthur

Preferred Member
Mar 9, 2010
6,883
0
Someplace I have directions for doing what those old boys are doing. Hope to try it next fall if I can get some ground turned for my baccy patch.

 

pstlpkr

Preferred Member
Dec 14, 2009
9,739
0
Birmingham, AL
I've never seen an explanation of the name "Perique" that was very convincing.
Me either.... That's why I was so careful in my wording above...
OEUD!... OEUD!!!! My Kingdom for an Oxford English Unabridged Dictionary!

I may have to drive down to the Library at the University of Montevallo and look it up... In the OEUD.

An amazing wall of books.

 

seanz

Preferred Member
May 8, 2011
651
0
Southland NZ
[Someplace I have directions for doing what those old boys are doing. Hope to try it next fall if I can get some ground turned for my baccy patch. ]

my thought exactly unclearthur, and got the designs on paper for a mini press for some cavandish

 

seanz

Preferred Member
May 8, 2011
651
0
Southland NZ
i was thinking along the lines of the wool press style, hydraulic into a lined box. I was looking at those photos of them doing the perique and thought i could go there. i know it wont be the same as theres in regards to leaf and soil but still willing to give it a whirl.

 

unclearthur

Preferred Member
Mar 9, 2010
6,883
0
Never hurts to try. Some of the guys over on the how to grow tobacco forum have played with perique style curing.