Working Document on Mason Jars

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pylorns

Preferred Member
Aug 20, 2013
1,956
1
Austin
https://medium.com/p/83ae13edc707
Suggestions for comments or additions or corrections requested.

 

frost

Junior Member
Feb 7, 2014
56
0
Colorado
Thank you for putting together this helpful document. One thing I've wondered is if the lids should pop down over time? I'm pretty sure that they are sealed, (I've made sure nothing is on the rim of the jars interfering with the seal) they just haven't formed a vacuum like you see in the regular canning process.

 

spartan

Preferred Member
Aug 14, 2011
2,964
0
Small spelling error, but spot on otherwise.
I’d you’d like to take it a step further, place empty jars right side up in a pot or boiling water canner.
One thing I've wondered is if the lids should pop down over time?
They might, but it's not a requirement to have an air tight environment.
As the tobacco ages, the microbes, or good tobacco bacteria ;) , they will consume the air in the jar slowly and the lid might shut down, or may even pop up as when things eat they usually give off waste, or other gases in this case. There have been plenty of older tins that show signs of swelling.
So the most likely thing that will happen is that your lid should pop up.

 

pylorns

Preferred Member
Aug 20, 2013
1,956
1
Austin
Great catch on the spelling issue!
Something to add about the lids, thanks! Check it - I added your quote and your attributed spartan.
If anyone else has data on the amount of a specific tobacco they've gotten into a jar please let me know so I can include it.

 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
17,874
66
Where did this idea come from that microbes consume the oxygen without giving off a replacement byproduct? I question that, as all of my canning guides will state that a seal comes from differentials in pressure creating a vacuum.

And, we do know that microbes can create gasses, as I have a bunch of tins 4-6 years old that are swollen out like balloons. However, I have several jars that are 4-6 years old with no swelling, but vacuum sealed tops are in tact. It gets very confusing.

 

pylorns

Preferred Member
Aug 20, 2013
1,956
1
Austin
Also differences in temperature can cause the lid to pop - if your jars are used to 75 degrees and you drop the temp to 45 degrees - you'll see the lids suck in. SOOOO I think there are a number of variables.

 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
17,874
66
Well, not to nit pick (well maybe, ha ha), but temperature is what causes the differential in pressure, which is why most of us suggest running the jars through the dishwasher on the "pots and pan" setting. I know the jars come clean enough, but running them through there before packing and sealing them, warms the jars and better sets the seal. I just use a waterbath canner to warm my jars beforehand. But, I also have a room just for canning, because canning is a way of life for us that live off of our own produce.
I know that you can get a seal without doing that, but it doesn't work 100% for everyone in every environment. it may work for someone in their location, and then someone else will ruin their stash by trying it. Just packing fresh jars straight out of the box can be a tricky blanket suggestion to everyone.

 

pylorns

Preferred Member
Aug 20, 2013
1,956
1
Austin
So back on topic on amount of tobacco - looking for more feedback on how much you can stuff into each size and the type of tobacco you stuffed.

 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
17,874
66
When I order five pound bags of various blends, it's hodgepodge on how much cubic volume the blends will have verses the weight, even in the same cut. For example, I can get 36 half pint jars out of Virginia #1, yet five pounds of McClelland 2015 only gave me 20 jars, both broken flake. I'm pretty sure this is because of water content and how easy it is to compress into the jar.

Full Flakes are about the most consistent in volume, but I pack them by weight, to keep from having to open up 8oz of a flake when the time comes and having the age and taste diminish before I can finish smoking the jar.
Sorry, to take you off-topic, but I thought that I was responding to your OP. I've noticed in the pipe hobby that if something is said a certain number of times in posts, it becomes a fact, no matter what the facts are. :wink:

 

namuna

Member
Sep 22, 2013
168
0
Great write-up! Thanks for doing this, I'll be using this for reference for sure.

 

loneredtree

Preferred Member
May 27, 2011
513
1
Good article!
Note that these jars come in both narrow mouth and wide mouth styles. I like the half pint wide mouth jars in the "collection elite" style. A pipe can be loaded directly from the jar since the opening is nice and wide.
Opening a jar stops the aging. Small jars are favored by many since the aging can continue in the bulk of the stash while a fraction can be smoked.
I can get 50 grams of ribbon cut into a half pint jar and 100 grams into pint. I do not smoke a lot so I will pack 100 g into two half pint jars.
You might include a paragraph on the label varieties that can be put on the lid or jar directly.

 

mrenglish

Preferred Member
Dec 25, 2010
2,189
1
Columbus, Ohio
I've gotten 500g of St. James Flake into the quart sized jar, its packed pretty good though. A pound of ODF will fit nicely into the quart size with plenty of room left over. A pound of Stonehaven also fits into a quart jar with not much excess space.
Great article!!!

 

4dotsasieni

Preferred Member
Jan 6, 2013
756
0
Thanks for posting this very useful and complete guide.
I'm wondering if anyone has had any experience with those plastic lockdown canisters sold by 4noggins, among others. I've seen them used in tobacconists' shops, and wonder how they'd be for home use?