Tobbaco On Consignment?

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toobfreak

Preferred Member
Dec 19, 2016
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I was perusing one of our vendors sites and the heading caught my eye: Consignment Tobaccos. Hmmm. Some were quite expensive at $70 for 100g, and I even saw one for over $100!
But what surprised me was the vendor's disclaimer that the seal on old tins can go bad on their own and the contents dry out. Anyone ever have that happen?
That it was no big deal and to just re-hydrate it. I've never had a dried out weed come back well enough good as new, much less after paying a dollar a gram.
But that they also made no guarantees on the condition and it was a buy it at your own risk totally! Really? Can't they at least look the tins over and say AS FAR AS WE CAN SEE, everything looks OK and in good condition? Even if the buyer understands that there is no promise of satisfaction?
They make it sound like the stuff came in, they never even checked it out, have no idea if there is a bullet hole in the side, and you git what you git and don't squabble about it if the stuff is shit.
I should think the tins would be graded by condition. Final price fixed by both rarity, age, demand, AND visual inspection.
Just wondering what folk's experiences have been (if any) buying old consignment tins and why would you take the totally open-ended risk at these high prices? Just a way to burn yer money and take yer chances? Has anyone ever gotten a lemon?
There WERE some tins there that looked pretty tempting.

 

mcitinner1

Preferred Member
Apr 5, 2014
4,044
0
Missouri
"I should think the tins would be graded by condition. Final price fixed by both rarity, age, demand, AND visual inspection."
I assure you this IS done. He has many loyal customers, and a fine reputation. You might have done a little research before posting such a lengthy and negatively charged subject.
Edit: Pipestud is who I was talking about.
Edit: He could be talking about 4Noggins.

 

clickklick

Preferred Member
May 5, 2014
1,673
0
Buy from pipestud. Problem solved.
Risk of old sealed tins loosing their seal is greatly dependent on shipping and weather. Always a risk.

 

clickklick

Preferred Member
May 5, 2014
1,673
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Lol and yes, I know the OP was speaking of pipestud to begin with. That's why it is so funny!

 

ashdigger

Preferred Member
Jul 30, 2016
5,265
14
I've purchased old tins from Pipestud......his packaging, the care of selection and shipping CANNOT be beat. He's a true professional, not some careless hack.

 

whitesands77

Member
Oct 12, 2016
108
1
Mehh, it's just CYA in effect. I've purchased a few of those tins myself and haven't had any issues. Luckily tobacco is fairly resilient and can be re-hydrated with ease.

 

toobfreak

Preferred Member
Dec 19, 2016
1,365
0
You might have done a little research before posting such a lengthy and negatively charged subject.
Didn't mean to sound negative and no, I was not directing at any individual I know of. My apologies if it came across any other way. Just wondered what people's luck had been with such tins because the wording on the site really sounds like the tin's conditions and integrity are wide open to pot luck.
And I guess a secondary reason in the back of my mind was it made me wonder if tins I'm aging in my cellar might fail on their own over the years just from normal aging. I worry a little about these larger cans which appear to be a metalized spun cardboard with a thin foil lid; not solid metal. I guess I should have explained that better.

 

whitesands77

Member
Oct 12, 2016
108
1
Yes there is a risk of tins loosing their seal just in storage. If you order a "new" tin it could loose its seal in the flight to you as well. I have had a tin that had about 10yrs of age and I broke the seal with just a little finger pressure. It just depends. Consignment tins can just be visually inspected and advertised as such. No warranties can be made because there is uncertainty once it leaves the hands of the seller to you.

Pipestud is a class act and a fantastic resource for buying consignment tins. I have had zero problems and will continue to buy from him.

4noggins is more commercial and without that personal touch, but I haven't had any problems either with them.
I suggest purchasing one of the tins you want and enjoy it when it gets to you.

 

oldgeezersmoker

Preferred Member
Oct 7, 2016
1,116
4
Tins do pop on their own, and they pop in shipping rather more frequently. Doesn't have to be that old, either. I stocked up on several blends in the summer when there were some good prices, and one tin of the Escudo I had bought arrived popped. Product was fine, so shipping (changes in air pressure?) Was likely the culprit.

 

toobfreak

Preferred Member
Dec 19, 2016
1,365
0
Well, that's why I'm asking--- this is my research and what better place to get answers? I appreciate the FB guys. I'm venturing into untested waters for me, in all my years, I either bought 50g tins (thick solid metal that you opened with a coin) or bulk that went into jars. Then I drifted into cigars for a number of years until I finally came back realizing my first true love was still pipes (not that I would refuse a Padron if it was offered to me!).
But I recently bought a 9 ounce can and was taken back by its lightness of container. Very thin wall aluminum and a rather delicate foil membrane under a plastic lid. Such packaging does not appear designed for the long life some cellars might demand.
I was visiting some vendors online looking for brands I've never tried before just to see what was out there and came across this consignment stuff and by the sounds of it, no it was not pipestud. It was 4noggins and if you read their wording there, you will see why I asked. And no, I did not mean to offend anyone.
But reading your comments above, it sounds to me like maybe companies ought to maybe rethink their packaging to better withstand changes in air pressure, I know that 9 ounce tin I got did not appear to have much vacuum inside, so going to high altitude in air travel, I can see how the internal pressure might break through that rather flimsy foil seam. Considering the cost of some of the consignment stuff and the value we place on tobacco in general these days (especially with the FDA), I for one would like to see better packaging in these larger tins. I ran into the same issue with some of the SPC stuff. I just don't like these new-style ultra-light cans. They are just a cost-saving measure. Thanks everyone.

 

whitesands77

Member
Oct 12, 2016
108
1
Agreed on your views. Also, the tinning isn't meant to be for "storage" these companies are punching out tins to be opened by consumers and not left on a shelf. I would think the R&D on a new quality tin that evades the most rigorous exposures would just not be cost effective for the producer and would inevitably impact the price point to the consumer... I've ordered three tins from 4noggins consignment shop and they've all been fine. :D

 

backwoodsjack

Member
Sep 25, 2015
179
0
Central Minnesota
I think pipestud has been very direct when there is the possibility of a bad seal.

When tobacco dries out, it shrinks and will rattle a bit in the can. The man is better educated on the contents of old tins than most. He has seen enough old tins to make a qualified assessment.
He has stated upfront when he suspects the seal may have gone, and usually prices them accordingly.
As for the prices, this is capitalism. The market dictates the selling price. I am sometimes surprised as well to see old tins fetching $225.00. But lo and behold the tins sell, every time. So it is clearly worth the price to someone.
.02

 

sablebrush52

Preferred Member
Jun 15, 2013
9,609
107
The flat tins, especially the square and rectangular tins, all leak. Over time they're bound to lose their seal. Two of the tobaccos that I bought from Pipestud were dried out, but Pipestud had also stated that it was a possibility with one of them because of the noise when he shook it. I rehydrated both and enjoyed them.

The tin can look perfectly new, and still have dried out contents. It's the risk you take buying any vintage tin of tobacco, regardless of the source. If you're holding for long term, jar the tobacco, or further seal the tin and hope for the best.

 

toobfreak

Preferred Member
Dec 19, 2016
1,365
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You mean they still appear vacuum sealed (pulled down on top)? And how do they seem to recover with hydration? I've never felt that a dried out tobacco ever came back close to good as new but maybe I'm wrong.
You guys are making me rethink all the square tins I have cellared, that maybe I need to wrap them all with tape or something.

 

sablebrush52

Preferred Member
Jun 15, 2013
9,609
107
You mean they still appear vacuum sealed (pulled down on top)?
Can't speak to that, but looking like they're factory fresh, no rust, that sort of thing, the contents can be dried out.
And how do they seem to recover with hydration?
Something is always lost, but not all. I'm smoking some 1999 MacBaren Navy Flake that I bought from Pipestud, which turned out to be pretty dried out, and it resuscitated wonderfully.
I am going to seal the tins that I have, probably tape around the seal to slow down the leaking, and see how that works. Stacked tins take up less space than a pile of jars.

 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
17,943
126
Every month at our pipe club, we have a member who brings us a new selection from Pipestud's consignment cellar, and we've never sampled one that was ruined by poor packaging. Sure, some of them I didn't like, but not because of tin failure.

It's one of those things that if you are timid to try, don't. Just like I don't go to casinos because it would not be a pleasurable way for me to lose money, since I hate games. However, I would gladly risk money on sampling an ancient tin of tobacco. YMMV.

 

toobfreak

Preferred Member
Dec 19, 2016
1,365
0
I will certainly put a good wrap of quality tape on all of my square tins, at least. Done right, the seal should improve the durability by at least ten fold.