Smooth Pipes Tend To Smoke Better Than Sandblasted

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sixmp

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2012
421
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Here is a thought i just had on this. How would you know that your nose isn't picking up the smell of the finish from the outside of the bowl and it is effecting the taste in that way. If this was the case it wouldn't be a case of bad smoke but more a case of stinky finish.

 

cigrmaster

Preferred Member
May 26, 2012
13,780
1,280
United States
foggy, I have read your opinion on the other thread in regards to the finish tasting lousy. I am curious about this. Now don't your smooth pipes have a stain on them as well? Can you taste that? I honestly have never tasted stain or a rancid taste from any of my pipes. I am wondering if you are one of those super sensitive tasters. I have seen shows where they have coffee tasters, wine tasters and such that are hired due to their incredible sense of taste and smell. If you are one of those then I find it fascinating that you can taste the stain from the outside of a pipe, I also feel kind of bad for you that you are sensitive to those tastes. I am thankful my sense of smell and taste are not that developed, because it would suck if I could taste what you obviously do. You also mentioned that you buy Dunhill's and Pete's because they use a stain that is not so offensive most of the times, do you know of other makers who are aware of this issue?

 

clyde

Member
Jul 19, 2012
112
0
As a pipe smoker of many years and owner of many pipes, some rusticated, some smooth, all things considered have never felt one finish smoked hotter than the other. 8O

 

topd

Preferred Member
Mar 23, 2012
1,746
0
Emerson, Arkansas
Taste and tempature are two different things. For me.... and I repete, for me, one smokes as well

as the other.
But, a sandblast or rusticated pipe has more surface area than a smooth pipe and will dissipate heat

faster, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's cooler at any given time. If you take the outside

temperature of the pipe every 5 minutes and came up with 'an average', I'll bet on 10 different bowls

on a sandblast, and 10 bowls on a smooth, you'll have different numbers during the day. Inside,

outside, wind, no wind, tobacco type, tobacco cut... all variables considered.

 

foggymountain

Preferred Member
Aug 14, 2012
2,872
9
Cigrmaster: I did not know that I have unusually good taste. It is possible though. Cooking is one of my skills and I have worked as a chef. Supposedly when some senses are dull the others are stronger. I have poor sight and hearing, so maybe that is why. Yes smooth pipes have stain & wax too, but because of a smaller surface area they have less. I do taste the stain on them as well. The taste improves when the pipe is well broken in and gets darker. Some pipemakers are obviously aware of this and use stains with less taste. They are Dunhill, except for the black shells, Peterson, except for the walnut finish, and the father son workshop of Benni and Lasse, whose stains are tasteless. No doubt there are others as well, but I don't know who they are and can't afford to find out. I stick to pipes from those makers, or Turkish meerschaums, because I know there will be no problems. Even the wax on the meers bothers me, but the bad taste disappears as the pipes color.

 

chopz

Senior Member
Oct 14, 2011
352
0
it's not the undulations of the carving that cause the rusticated surface to absorb more stain. i'm sure many of you know a rough piece of wood will absorb a lot more stain than a polished surface. i've brought a piece of maple to a glossy sheen without any sort of finish added to it. when you get wood that finely polished it stains less than one that's left somewhat rougher.
i don't taste stain in a pipe (far as i know) so it doesn't bother me. i do know someone who's a wine tasting expert, to the extent that she can tell you what region a grape in a given wine came from. i don't claim to have any such talent, but neither do i disparage her abilities.
i'm wondering if the pipe i carved myself tasted so sweet from the initial smoke because of this stain reason. the wood certainly held a minimal amount of color when i stained it. really there's only one way to settle this: someone has to make 2 pipes out of similar blocks of wood, side by side, and make one smooth and one rough. until then the jury's out.

 

cigrmaster

Preferred Member
May 26, 2012
13,780
1,280
United States
foggy, it maybe your training as a chef that has developed your sense of taste and as you say because of your poor eyes and ears it may have developed even further. Does the stain taste go away on rusticated and sandblatsed pipes after a while like on smooths, or because there is so much it stays forever?

 

admin

Smoking a Pipe Right Now
Staff member
Nov 16, 2008
7,962
233
St. Petersburg, FL
All of my pipes smoke hot because I puff like a railroad train, and my silver car goes faster than your red car.
Seriously though, I can't tell the difference.

 
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