Pronunciation of Pipe-things

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odobenus

Member
Dec 15, 2018
250
10
Vermont
I was re-listening to the two excellent interviews with Ken Barnes on the Pipes Magazine podcast and noted that Ken pronounces 'Sasieni' as 'Sah-seeny.' Somehow the correct pronunciation sailed past my impenetrable ignorance until now. I wonder how many of you kindly folks out there joined me in saying 'Sah-see-enny.' I'm going to try it like Ken from now on.
Sidenote: Ken also keeps saying 'Chair-atan' and Brian persists in pronouncing it like the hotel chain. Sometimes, I guess, it takes us a while to hear things right.
Thirdnote: I went down a true internet rabbit-hole about how to pronounce 'Latakia' a few months ago and came to the somewhat gratifying conclusion that there's no right way: Unless you speak the particular dialect of that region of Syria, it's a safe bet you're saying it wrong. Though apparently 'Lat-uh-KEE-uh' is a hell of a lot closer than the BBC's official 'Luh-TAK-ee-uh.'

 

homeatsea

Preferred Member
Mar 6, 2013
513
0
The two I've just accepted I likely won't get right are latakia and cavendish.

 

daniel7

Senior Member
Sep 11, 2018
305
0
You don't need to pronounce Oom Paul, just say Hungarian instead. :wink:

 

mikethompson

Preferred Member
Jun 26, 2016
3,941
52
Lata-kia, just like Russ says in his videos. If its good enough for him its good enough for me.

 

warren

Preferred Member
Sep 13, 2013
7,342
12
I know an "Oom Paul" when I see one. I have no idea what a "Hungarian" is. Is this now the "politically correct" name? Goodness gracious me!

 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
25,886
64
I wouldn't feel particularly out-of-the-loop. Most of us are exposed to this language in writing, so unless we discuss it with someone more knowledgeable, we do the best we can, and there are many differences even between correct pronunciations between English speaking countries. In the U.S., now many people are using Spanish pronunciations when speaking English, both because they are proud of knowing Spanish and because they feel it is truer to what they are saying, though I think it is somewhat optional at this point. Language is ever-changing. Shakespeare was a blanking genius and his plays are all his or hers or whoever's, but part of the stimulus, as students of the plays have long contended, was that he was writing and performing as an actor in a time when English was evolving quickly so puns and images just lept from common speech.

 

railman

Junior Member
Mar 9, 2019
73
0
There’s been a few pipemaker’s names that surprised me how they are supposed to be pronounced as opposed to how I imagined them to be pronounced.

 

daniel7

Senior Member
Sep 11, 2018
305
0
I know an "Oom Paul" when I see one. I have no idea what a "Hungarian" is. Is this now the "politically correct" name? Goodness gracious me!
That pipe shape was invented/started to produce in Debrecen, Hungary in the XVIII. century from meer, clay and hardwood.

 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
25,886
64
We (US) say aluminum and the Brits say aluminium. We say schedule as skedual, but the Brits say shedual. The English "got there" first, but the US people remade the language in their own image. So it goes. Many languages get so changed by demographic groups that it is not understandable to other demographic groups despite having the same linguistic basis. The Chinese essentially speak different languages -- Cantonese, Mandarian, but others too. Many English actors do impeccable American speech when needed. Northerners in the U.S. have long imitated Southern speech, but a sailor from Rome, Georgia, on my ship in the Navy, did a wonderful imitation of Yankee speech, with a really good ear, hitting those consonants hard and doing the vowels in a totally Northern way. Good ear. Great to hear. I grew up with the old man of Chicago politics, Richard J. Daley, who was unquestionably Irish on both sides. For years I puzzled over why his speech had zero Irish lilt or brogue at all. I finally decided that he had grown up in a blue collar neighborhood, where he continued to live all his adult life, and I hypothesize that he lived around a lot of Polish people, so that's the way he spoke. The Irish "sing" their English. The Polish more chew it, as Mayor Daley did.

 

odobenus

Member
Dec 15, 2018
250
10
Vermont
I was surprised, even though I should've known better, by the proper pronunciation of Jess Chonowitsch.

Also I would've thought Eltang would be pronounced 'el-tong' like S. Bang is 'Bong' but Brian Levine and others say it like the orange astro-powder.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TWghCdIqedA

 

didimauw

Moderator
Staff member
Jul 28, 2013
3,136
70
30
WI
That's interesting. I'm sure I screw up a lot of pronunciations of pipe related things.
When I think of some I'll post it

 

ashdigger

Preferred Member
Jul 30, 2016
5,264
9
I'm still trying to pronounce Pro-nun-see-aye-get the fuck away from me (shun).

 

scloyd

Preferred Member
May 23, 2018
1,758
19
I have one Chacom pipe. I say Sha-comb. Right or wrong?
How do you pronounce Butz-Choquin? Butts or Boots? Sho-kin, sho-keen, sho-coin? Or something completely different?

 

mortonbriar

Preferred Member
Oct 25, 2013
911
3
I had friends go through Syria a few years ago now, (before the chaos) and they stayed a night or two in Latakia. I asked him about the pronunciation and he insisted it was

'la TAR kia', as opposed to the youtube 'lata KIA'. I just wish I had of asked him to take note before he went on the trip rather than after so I could be sure...
Do we have any Syrian pipe smokers on the forum? I really would like some finality to this one...
Isaac

 

chilipalmer

Member
Aug 24, 2017
130
1
What about the Lovat? Is it pronounced "love-it," "la-vat," or some other way?
I have a Rattray 56 Lovat that I am rather fond of and keep around in honor of Simon Fraser, 15th Lord Lovat.
Cheers,
Chili