Pavorotti, The Movie Biography

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mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
26,931
1,558
If you were a fan of the famous tenor, Luciano Pavorotti, or happen to like opera if not him specifically, or are interested mostly in movies, this film "directed" by Ron Howard, the child star who evolved into a major Hollywood director makes a substantial claim for putting a documentary/biography into contention for "best movie" Oscar or other top awards. What could go wrong? Everything. Luciano was a huge man, a vast and unparalleled operatic voice, and an expansive personality to say the least. He saw himself as a sort of peasant touched by God with the voice. He moved from a traditional opera career into a super star career that reached into many genres and places not accustomed to opera stars. With his vast energy, he seemed to breath life into a sick daughter, a fellow tenor who nearly died of an illness, and a second wife who seems to have lived an active life despite M.S. Howard gathered clips and did interviews with a wide circle of his family, colleagues, business associates and admirers. The film is riveting and puts you close to the man living large in every way. His colorful hats, scarves, and getups expressed his reach beyond custom and ordinary life. His estate was over $400 million, but he came to use his talent for charity and good works even as his magnificent voice diminished. This is an intense film and worth every minute you spend with it. This puts Ron Howard, the child who played Oppy on TV's Andy Griffiths show, at a new higher level as a director. Luciano could have overridden a lesser cinematography professional, but Howard puts it all on the screen with amazing skill.

 

alaskanpiper

Preferred Member
May 23, 2019
2,538
2,423
Alaska
Sounds interesting. Not a big opera guy, but I'm a sucker for a good documentary, may have to check it out soon. Thanks!

 

taildraggin

Junior Member
May 25, 2019
62
0
He effortlessly covered the spectrum, what others could only partially. Like him or not he had the greatest instrument we have heard.

Thanks for the tip on the documentary, Ron Howard does good work.

 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
26,931
1,558
I used to work with a boss who became a friend, who was a trained tenor, really fine voice. He went to hear Pavorotti when Luciano was doing a concert tour of arenas, all huge venues. My friend marveled at the power of the voice, the "instrument" as 'draggin says. I think his massive body served as an extra sounding board to an already extra large voice. Like anyone who lived large under the public spotlight, he attracted a large contingent of detractors, not featured much in the film. He certainly had his human frailty, and had it magnified by fame. When his voice began to age and fail, some took note and relished in it. When he was doing well, he always looked like he was completely reveling in the moment.