Other than the grain

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owen

Preferred Member
May 28, 2014
560
0
Having smoked a number of budget pipes I now want to spend a bit more on a great pipe, but here is the thing; can you please make a few recomendations for quality pipes based on how they smoke rather than how they look?

I guess there a huge number of factors that determine the price of premium pipes so appologise if this question just leads to personal preference.

 

masonwarden

Junior Member
Mar 10, 2014
56
0
In terms of how they smoke, a good thing to consider is whether or not you use/enjoy a filter. Similarly, if you don't enjoy a filter, how do you feel about the draw resulting from a filtered pipe without the filter? This can be cheaply and easily experienced by using a filtered cob.

 

owen

Preferred Member
May 28, 2014
560
0
I have tried a cob with and without and like the easy draw that comes without a filter. I seem to smoke rather hard so anything other than this I end up with a sore head and feel really cross!

 

metarzan

Preferred Member
Nov 14, 2012
572
0
One man's budget pipe is another man's top of the line dream pipe. What price range are we talking here? I am assuming an off the shelf mainstream brand and not a commission? For me it goes Stanwell, Nording, Savinelli, Peterson but I also have a cheaper Viking that I like best of all. Preference will vary but any of those four would be a great step up from a basket pipe or a cob IMO.

 

owen

Preferred Member
May 28, 2014
560
0
About £50 will be the top for me, straight billiard I guess, Savinelli,Peterson, Parker?

 

escioe

Preferred Member
Oct 31, 2013
702
0
You're in England. Go find a used Comoy or GBD on eBay. It'll already be broken in, and if it smoked poorly, it wouldn't have lasted long enough to be sold in 2014.

 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
17,944
131
Any pipe can deliver a fantastic smoke, IMO. I don't think there's a pipe out there that makes a pipe that smokes horribly. Even Petersons smoke well.

Just get what you can afford and learn how that pipe wants to be smoked. The cost has absolutely no bearing on anything. This idea of quality is in relation to what you prefer in a pipe. If you like Grabows, then pipes that have qualities similar to that will be your idea quality. If you prefer the qualities of a Dunhill, then your stuck buying expense factory pipes. YMMV

 

necron99

Member
Mar 4, 2014
269
0
The drilling is most important to functionality.

the bowl interior walls should be straight and smooth, and the draft hole should be as close to the center of the bottom of the bowl as possible. If all appears to be in good order run a pipe clean through, if the pipe cleans passes through easily then you are in good shape.

On a side note make sure if you get a freehand pipe that the pipe walls don't have thin areas.

 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
25,940
114
Most of the better known brands come in a range of prices. You can spend $50 or hundreds on a Savenelli,

and get your money's worth. Same with Chacom, Stanwell, Nording, Neerup, and so on. Most pipes of these

brands will smoke well. So you CAN factor looks into it. If a pipe isn't appetizing to you, it can be a fine

smoker, but you may not pick it up as often. I like to buy my pipes new, but many get more satisfaction

out of buying an estate pipe at considerably less than the new price. Most of the good brands won't disappoint

you, new or estate. Likewise, you don't have to spend hundreds to buy hand-carved pipes, most of which are

fine smokers, new or estate. Decide what you feel comfortable spending, and buy from a reputable retailer,

like the sponsors of pipesmagazine, and you will do well, nine times out of ten, or better.

 

12pups

Preferred Member
Feb 9, 2014
1,063
1
Minnesota
Short answer is, you can't know until you've smoked it. I have a Sav that sucks shit. Another, wonderful! just absolutely wonderful. Both of the guys who sold them to me told me they'd be wonderful. After all, they were Savinelli's.
Now I know better.

 

bwithers55

Member
Jul 17, 2012
107
0
Escioe gave you some *very* sound advice. The fact that these old British pipes are still available today, speaks well for them. I'm partial to the old Comoy's Tradition lovats- easily had for 5-20 pounds on ebay. They are made of excellent wood, with superb engineering, and very light in weight.
Best Wishes,

Bill Withers

 

mrmotoyoshi

Member
Jan 8, 2014
161
0
Motoyoshi, Japan
If you are buying it from a shop and have a chance to actually inspect it....
Make sure that the drill hole in the bottom of the bowl is lined up in the center with the draft hole in the stem. A good pipe will have a straight shot from the mouth piece all the way to the drill hole at the bottom of the tobacco chamber. In conjunction with that, ideally it will pass a pipe cleaner no problem.
Also, it's best when the drill hole is level with the bottom of the tobacco chamber. Use your cell phone or get in some good lighting but these things will prove a better smoke than a pipe that can't pass a cleaner with a drill hole a half inch above the bottom of the bowl.
And make sure you love how it looks ;)

 

ithelouniverse

Preferred Member
Dec 30, 2013
513
0
West Texas
I cannot say enough good things about my Randy Wiley. They start around 150 ish dollars and I love mine! But to be fair, mine was closer to 300 and I've only ever seen the 150-200 ones, never smoked
As far as bang for your buck, I have 6 Savinellis, and they ranged from 70 dollars to almost 200. They are great pipes and look classy as hell too!

 

owen

Preferred Member
May 28, 2014
560
0
Thanks guys some sound, sound advice. This problem has come about because of an ebay pipe purchase which has blown me away due to the way it smokes. That said as I smoke it more it is more than just that, the pipe has real balance and all other little factors that must be playing a part to.

 

cigrmaster

Preferred Member
May 26, 2012
13,543
151
United States
Proper drilling is a must, a shank dimension of 4.0-4.5 mm is a must and having thicker walls will also be a key factor. For shorter money companies like Castello, Radice Ardor, Mastro De Paja, Don Carlos, Savinelli offer great values. For and artisan pipe, Rad Davis is my favorite. A hand cut stem that has no turbulence makes a huge difference in how a pipe will smoke. I am not a big fan of the British pipes because in general, their shank dimensions are smaller than 4.0 mm and they can smoke wet.
Also remember, you cannot smoke grain so a blasted pipe will smoke every bit as good as a smooth for much less money.

 

cortezattic

Preferred Member
Nov 19, 2009
14,409
192
Chicago, IL
P&C.com has a bunch of N.O.S. Dutch Hilson Vintage pipes on sale: $120 pipes reduced to $95

They are 40 - 50 yrs. old, and look like a great buy. I bought this Dublin and I am very pleased with it.



I just noticed you are in England. Too bad P&C won't ship internationally. :oops:
Invicta Briars makes a reasonably priced pipe (£45) with great performance. Mine isn't pretty, but it smokes well.



 

msandoval858

Preferred Member
Jun 11, 2012
954
0
Austin, TX
For me the key factors are drilling, good thickness in the walls, the stem and overall fit and finish. Although most guys consider the pipe cleaner test a must, I have had several bent pipes that smoke wonderfully despite not passing a cleaner easily. Now if you have a straight billiard that doesn't pass a cleaner, that'd be different story.
The stem is a huge factor for me. I clench so it has to be comfortable. Both acrylic and rubber work fine for me provided the bit is well shaped and gives me something to bite on to.

 

cigrmaster

Preferred Member
May 26, 2012
13,543
151
United States
Mike, you can have your bents re drilled to take a pipe cleaner. Zack( a member here) just re drilled my bent Willmer and the difference is amazing. One of my biggest pet peeves is a pipe that will not pass a fluffy cleaner with ease. Even if it smokes fine, the mere fact it does not pass a cleaner throws me into a homicidal rage. :roll: