Mineral Oil

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charf

Member
Jul 10, 2018
227
12
New Zealand
I have read somewhere that mineral oil is good to rub on the outside of your smooth pipes to protect them as they suffer wear and tear. Mineral oil is better than say olive oil which can go rancid? So when you say mineral oil what exactly are we talking about. Clean unused engine oil? Can someone enlighten me please.

 

mtwaller

Senior Member
Nov 21, 2018
403
6
Atlanta, GA
Apparently it’s good on black stems, as well. Rub in, let sit, and buff out from what I’ve seen. Never used it myself, though.

 

jpmcwjr

Preferred Member
May 12, 2015
13,482
59
Monterey Peninsula
Yes, food grade. It's clear and clean, and works well on stems to hide oxidation and bring out the black. Won't be glossy as buffed wax can be, but then not everyone wants shiny shiny.

 

puffy

Preferred Member
Dec 24, 2010
2,436
3
North Carolina
It's a clear food grade oil.It can be used to ease constipation.It sells for 2 bucks a bottle in these parts.Just about all drug stores and grocery stores here in Carolina sell it.Even most dollar stores do.

 

chasingembers

Preferred Member
Nov 12, 2014
15,505
115
Won't be glossy as buffed wax can be
Don't need buffed wax for glossy. You can get mirror black with toothpaste.
A briar wiped with oil will seep as it warms from smoking, and leave you with oily hands.

 

hauntedmyst

Preferred Member
Feb 1, 2010
1,106
54
I wouldn't put any kind of oil on the outside of my pipe bowls. You don't want the pores of the wood to clog, and as frigate says, it will weep. Most people use mineral or olive oil on the stems which is fine but not on the bowl. Save up and get an inexpensive buffer and put nothing but 100% pure carnauba wax (from a block, not your can you use on your car) on them. Seriously one of the best investments in pipe care you can make.
A cheaper alternative used to be a product called Briar Pipe Wipe. I was told it's just repackaged Favor polish. Spray it on a cloth and let it dry (do not use it wet, there are alcohols in it which can remove the staining). After its dried, it makes a great tool for wiping down your pipe and putting a nice shine on them.
I use both the above methods with great success.

 

mikethompson

Preferred Member
Jun 26, 2016
3,956
71
I've thought about trying mineral oil, but I've found that toothpaste and/or bar keepers friend is just as good.
Lots of good options out there!

 

jpmcwjr

Preferred Member
May 12, 2015
13,482
59
Monterey Peninsula
Mineral oil on stems:
++: For looks. Requires no elbow grease other than a brief rub, is effective and cheap. Also helps retard oxidation.
--: Doesn't produce a high gloss, and doesn't remove much oxidation.
Mineral oil on briar:
Does not weep , feel oily or greasy, nor prevent the briar from breathing (which is de minimis anyway) if applied very sparingly. I use it on recently scrubbed rims, and if the wood appears dull, a quick rub down with a cloth with a bit of mineral oil on the rest of the stummel.

 

charf

Member
Jul 10, 2018
227
12
New Zealand
Thanks guys. I probably should have Googled this first but it’s alway good to get advice from the experts! Food Grade mineral oil, who would have guessed...

 

jpmcwjr

Preferred Member
May 12, 2015
13,482
59
Monterey Peninsula
By what name does it go under Down Under?
I'd add that mineral is not the first choice to apply to the stummel. I found it does no harm when I was touching up the rims after a vigorous scrubbing, so if the pipe is looking particularly dull, I might whisk over the whole thing. But very sparingly, and wiping it down immediately thereafter. HTH.
Now, on the stems, it's magic for me. Gets them black and a bit shiny with no labor. Others will prefer to completely remove the oxidation and buff with carnauba, or use toothpaste, etc.., and finish with wax or mineral oil.